Question Is System specific RAM actually system specific?

ConanLock

Respectable
Hello,
I'm looking at some 'system specific' RAM, manufactured by a company called Hypertec. According to their website, they make their RAM to be 100% compatible with OEM systems, such as timing, ranking and signal integrity. I know that Kingston also has a similar product range. However, I'm wondering if this RAM could work inside any system - so long as the main factors match.
For example, if I were to buy RAM that is 2x8GB, DDR3-1600 unbuffered non-ECC, specifically for a family that includes Dell 7010 and Alienware Aurora R4, would it work in another system that takes these generic memory specifications? Common sense would tell me yes, since both the "target" system and my system take aftermarket/generic RAM, just as any other system typically would. However, if there is anything you know about that could suggest otherwise, I'd be interested to know.

Thanks,
Conan
 

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
That link was flagged as unsafe by Chrome.

The only thing you need to look for is,
a| that the ram conforms to the slot and the IMC of your platform.
b| that you're buying a kit and not mixing and matching sticks to get a cumulative number.
c| that you're on the latest BIOS update for your platform.
and
d| that link you're sharing is just marketing BS, ram is manufactured out of a handful of factories and the one's that don't make the cut are chucked out or given off at a cheap price with laxed timings and lower frequencies.

If the BIOS is nitpicky, these cheap rams will be a thron on your side.
 

egda23

Upstanding
Jun 14, 2020
410
71
290
15
Hello,
I'm looking at some 'system specific' RAM, manufactured by a company called Hypertec. According to their website, they make their RAM to be 100% compatible with OEM systems, such as timing, ranking and signal integrity. I know that Kingston also has a similar product range. However, I'm wondering if this RAM could work inside any system - so long as the main factors match.
For example, if I were to buy RAM that is 2x8GB, DDR3-1600 unbuffered non-ECC, specifically for a family that includes Dell 7010 and Alienware Aurora R4, would it work in another system that takes these generic memory specifications? Common sense would tell me yes, since both the "target" system and my system take aftermarket/generic RAM, just as any other system typically would. However, if there is anything you know about that could suggest otherwise, I'd be interested to know.

Thanks,
Conan
If you look for OEM specific RAM, I think that your best bet would be on Crucial.
Here you have their Advisor page https://www.crucial.com/store/advisor
 

ConanLock

Respectable
That link was flagged as unsafe by Chrome.

The only thing you need to look for is,
a| that the ram conforms to the slot and the IMC of your platform.
b| that you're buying a kit and not mixing and matching sticks to get a cumulative number.
c| that you're on the latest BIOS update for your platform.
and
d| that link you're sharing is just marketing BS, ram is manufactured out of a handful of factories and the one's that don't make the cut are chucked out or given off at a cheap price with laxed timings and lower frequencies.

If the BIOS is nitpicky, these cheap rams will be a thron on your side.
Thanks, I expected as much... I reckon they usually charge an overprice since they have "tested and confirmed 100% compatibility" for specific OEM systems or something like that; right now I have an opportunity to buy some quite cheaply.
As for the unsafe warning - not sure what that is, although I have noticed it loads quite slowly, perhaps a ddos or something.

If you look for OEM specific RAM, I think that your best bet would be on Crucial.
Here you have their Advisor page https://www.crucial.com/store/advisor
Thanks, Crucial is a good one for that. In this case though, I was looking to see whether specific ram for a different system would work across the board.
 
So the answer is--it depends. If a particular system is more picky about ram, then something more 'compatible' will be important. But if the system is more open to industry standard specs (like how Dells products generally are), you're more than likely fine with modules that properly adhere to industry specs. (Cheap and fake sh.... won't adhere properly and can/will have problems.)

The days of fully proprietary memory are almost completely gone. There are some specialty applications that require it, but those are specialty computers as well.
 

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