[SOLVED] Is there any way to determine the TDP of Intel stock coolers?

ManOfArc

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I have an older Haswell PC in my workshop with a Pentium G3420 CPU in it now. I want to replace it with an i5-4690 I picked up. But the Pentium was only a 53W CPU, so I presume the cooler will be too small for the 84W i5-4690. I do however happen to have another stock cooler almost like it, but with a copper slug in the heat sink. Is there any way to pre-determine if that will be big enough? Or, must I install it and stress test the CPU to find out? In general, is there any way to tell what the TDP capacity of Intel stock coolers are?
 

CompuTronix

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Intel's Product Specifications website shows that the i5-4690 was boxed with the same 95 Watt TDP cooler (copper slug) as the 4670, 4770, 4790 and others, as well as the "K" variants. The 95 Watt cooler is designated "PCG 2013D" whereas the all aluminum 65 Watt cooler is designated PCG 2013C.

The Intel 95 Watt "D" variant is referred to as a "universal" stock cooler because it's been used for many generations of 77, 84, 88 and 95 Watt TDP processors. Changes to the cooler over the years have included its designations on the Product Specifications website and in the Datasheets, and of course, to the part numbers.

Here's a link to Intel Stock Coolers.

CT :sol:
 

punkncat

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As I recall Intel has only made a couple of cooler sizes anyway. I am sure there is verification on that somewhere online, like a wiki.
I still hear 'influencers' talk about the old copper core coolers as being decent. PErsonally would consider weighing them and use the heavier one.

In fairness none of the Intel coolers are particularly awe inspiring, however (IIRC) I don't think you are going to be issue using either of those coolers with a locked 65W chip like the 4690. I still have one in the house, it's on it's stock cooler, and aside from unrelated mobo issues has never seemed to have a problem performing correctly.
 

TommyTwoTone66

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In all honesty you don't want to be using an 8 year old cooler on the i5 regardless of whether it is rated for that chip. The fan will be worn out and the adhesive they used for the copper core will be starting to fail.

A cheap branded air cooler like the Arctic Freezer or a cooler master or something costs a few bucks and is well worth it imo.
 

ManOfArc

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As I recall Intel has only made a couple of cooler sizes anyway. I am sure there is verification on that somewhere online, like a wiki.
I still hear 'influencers' talk about the old copper core coolers as being decent. PErsonally would consider weighing them and use the heavier one.

In fairness none of the Intel coolers are particularly awe inspiring, however (IIRC) I don't think you are going to be issue using either of those coolers with a locked 65W chip like the 4690. I still have one in the house, it's on it's stock cooler, and aside from unrelated mobo issues has never seemed to have a problem performing correctly.
Actually, Intel rates the CPU at 84W (as stated above), not 65W. But I get your point.
 
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CompuTronix

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Intel's Product Specifications website shows that the i5-4690 was boxed with the same 95 Watt TDP cooler (copper slug) as the 4670, 4770, 4790 and others, as well as the "K" variants. The 95 Watt cooler is designated "PCG 2013D" whereas the all aluminum 65 Watt cooler is designated PCG 2013C.

The Intel 95 Watt "D" variant is referred to as a "universal" stock cooler because it's been used for many generations of 77, 84, 88 and 95 Watt TDP processors. Changes to the cooler over the years have included its designations on the Product Specifications website and in the Datasheets, and of course, to the part numbers.

Here's a link to Intel Stock Coolers.

CT :sol:
 

ManOfArc

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Intel's Product Specifications website shows that the i5-4690 was boxed with the same 95 Watt TDP cooler (copper slug) as the 4670, 4770, 4790 and others, as well as the "K" variants. The 95 Watt cooler is designated "PCG 2013D" whereas the all aluminum 65 Watt cooler is designated PCG 2013C.

The Intel 95 Watt "D" variant is referred to as a "universal" stock cooler because it's been used for many generations of 77, 84, 88 and 95 Watt TDP processors. Changes to the cooler over the years have included its designations on the Product Specifications website and in the Datasheets, and of course, to the part numbers.

Here's a link to Intel Stock Coolers.

CT :sol:
The 95 Watt cooler is designated "PCG 2013D" whereas the all aluminum 65 Watt cooler is designated PCG 2013C.
Good information there. But I still don't see any way to determine which coolers I have. Mine don't have anything close to those numbers you list. Some have an AL slug and some have no slug. None have a CU slug. All fit a 115x socket.
A) Does that mean mine aren't the correct cooler for a 95W TDP CPU?
B) Were there just the 95W and 65W that Intel sold with the Haswell CPU line?
 
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CompuTronix

Intel Master
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... I do however happen to have another stock cooler ... but with a copper slug ...
... Mine don't have ... a CU slug ...

A) Does that mean mine aren't the correct cooler for a 95W TDP CPU?
B) Were there just the 95W and 65W that Intel sold with the Haswell CPU line?
It appears that your 1st and 3rd posts contradict one another ... so which is it? Do you, or do you not, have an Intel stock cooler with a copper slug in the bottom?

A) If you don't have a cooler with a copper slug in the bottom, then you don't have a 95 Watt TDP cooler.
B) No, but Intel has typically re-used the same basic coolers over many generations to save money on design and manufacturing costs.

I haven't personally seen every Intel cooler variant over 13 generations of Core 2 and Core i processors from 2006 to the present, but Intel also lists PCG 2xxxA and PCG 2xxxB cooloers, as well as their 65 Watt PCG 2xxx"C" and 95 Watt PCG 2xxx"D" variants.

Here's the Product Specifications website link to your Pentium G3420 - https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/77775/intel-pentium-processor-g3420-3m-cache-3-20-ghz.html
Here's the Product Specifications webiste link to your i5-4690 - https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/80810/intel-core-i5-4690-processor-6m-cache-up-to-3-90-ghz.html

The numbers I listed are shown on the Product Specifications website and in the Datasheets. These numbers are designations; not part numbers. Intel seems to change both the designations and the part numbers with almost every launch of a new generation of processors, even though the actual 65 Watt TDP "C" and the 95 Watt TDP "D" coolers themselves remain the same.

Again, here's the link again to our sister site, AnandTech, who wrote the article about Intel Stock coolers - https://www.anandtech.com/show/10500/stock-cooler-roundup-intel-amd-vs-evo-212/3?_ga=2.32024574.1383078663.1618386648-771592782.1610610731 - which shows many (but not all) of Intel's stock coolers and their part numbers. I suggest that you give it a read.

CT :sol:
 

ManOfArc

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Yeah, my bad on the CU and AL confusion. I thought I had a CU slug in the one cooler, but on further inspection it turned out to be an AL slug. I guess I should have gone back and corrected the 1st statement.

But OK. Question answered. Thank you all.
 

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