IT Course Help

Mar 26, 2019
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Hello everyone!
New here, looking forward to dive right into the forums and website :)

I need some opinions from more experienced people about a course I'm thinking of having.
See, I've always been interested in IT and I did a ton of repairs, learned a lot here, built a gaming PC etc. Basically, I show interest.

I currently have time to dedicate for studies, and I'd really like to find a course which gives me some recognition in the IT field on paper. I'd be happy working as a sales person in a computer/gaming store, but it would also be nice to narrow down a path in the future.

I found this course in my country Cisco IT Essential PC Technician Course for 400 Euro. Here's the link:
https://icemalta.com/course/it-essentials-pc-technician-course/

I'd be really grateful to hear what you think about this course, if it's worth the price and if it means anything really in the end.
Thanks so much!
 

jimmysmitty

Champion
Moderator
You might want to start with A+ and N+ as a basis and then look into a more specilized area. The biggest issue is that one company might use Cisco , another might use Extreme Networks and the other might use Something else. They all have their own designs and setups.

Some use Sonicwall, while others might be using Palo Alto firewalls. They all have their own training as well. But A+ will give you the hardware basics and N+ will give you the networking basics and you can build from there.
 
Reactions: rymt12

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
In agreement with @jimmysmitty.....

And do take a look at the IT "Employment" ads.

Get a sense of what IT educational and experience levels local companies are seeking.

Learn the acronyms, learn to "read between the lines".

Get the basics (A+ and N+ as recommended) while looking ahead. No guarantees per se and many potential employers hedge their employment requirements / job requirements to have as much hiring flexibility as possible while avoiding potential discrimination charges fairly or unfairly.

Polish up your communication skills: verbal and written. Prove you are a team player. Prove you can step up and go beyond minimal efforts.

Truly boils down to convincing a potential employer that you can do the job without becoming a problem employee. Overall expect to "pay your dues" to prove yourself, your skills, your work ethics, and your integrity.

Recommended reading:

https://www.amazon.com/Cybersecurity-Leadership-Powering-Modern-Organization/dp/1502312115
 
Reactions: rymt12
Mar 26, 2019
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You guys are amazing, thank you so much!
This helps me so much. Will definitely be checking that book out.
Again... thank you :)
 
Mar 26, 2019
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I'm going to bother you all again :sweatsmile:
So you guys suggested getting the basics (A+ and N+), I did some research but I am still not 100% sure as to what they are.
I live in EU, and the closest I can think of is an A Level, is this the same thing?
Here's the syllabus if you're not familiar with A level.
https://www.um.edu.mt/matsec/syllabus/advancedlevel2020
Under Computing
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
The syllabus seems to be more "degree" focused than certification per se.

Here is a link that may help you get a sense of the concepts, skills, and requirements necessary for IT work.

https://www.businessnewsdaily.com/10718-comptia-certification-guide.html

What you must guard against is ending up in a program that only offers basic training, drags out (meaning you pay and pay....), and does not offer any real guarantees about the end results. I.e., some meaningful job placement, opportunities for internships, real hands on work.

Go to a book store, a library, or anywhere you can look at and peruse the A+ and N+ books and study guides. You might even find some books in used books stores for a fraction of new cost. Lots of online resources as well. Sample test exams. Tutorials. White papers.

Once you have a firm understanding of what you will need to know then you can use that understanding to evaluate any given course syllabus.

Always a good idea to do some research on the "school". Ask for student statistics, look for school reviews, visit the school if at all possible, talk to current students, view the facilities, learn about the instructors and staff. Be very wary of programs that offer financial assistance. They may make more money from that than tuition and actual teaching...
 

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