Question I've installed multiple gpu's in my system (rx6600xt and gtx 1060 6gb) and it caused some technical issues

Oct 30, 2022
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I've installed multiple gpu's in my system (rx6600xt and gtx 1060 6gb(I've installed it just bcause of my need in CUDA cores)) and it caused some technical issues: game freezes, stators, sound issues(sound just dissapears for a few seconds), and also, my RX started to load 1gb of vram even if nothing can load the vram(also RX started to forgot to clean up it's vram from the used assets(like when i've played the match,started another one, and vram usage just keeps going up)). I've already cleaned up my drivers with DDU and reinstalled it,but it still happens. Could it be caused by putting the RX not in the "main" pcie and putting a single cable branch to power up both of gpu's?
 

Aeacus

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I've installed it just bcause of my need in CUDA cores
Radeon GPU doesn't have any CUDA cores, so why to install it at all?
What Radeon GPUs have, are Stream Processors, and while the end result is same to CUDA cores, the architecture and design is completely different.

Due to that, at bare minimum, what you have, is GPU driver conflict. But most likely you have GPU conflict.

At 1st, when i read that you have dual-GPU setup, i thought it was due to workstation use, some obscure one which benefits from CUDA cores and Stream processors at the same time. Or perhaps even mining rig. But for gaming rig? o_O This is very stupid.

Here, take out your GTX 1060 and keep using only your RX 6600 XT since it's far more powerful (~85% better). Or if you absolutely need CUDA cores, take out your Radeon and use GTX 1060. And down the line, buy better GPU, e.g RTX 3060/3070.
Btw, for games, it doesn't matter if your GPU has CUDA cores or Steam processors, all games work fine with either of the GPU.
 
Oct 30, 2022
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Radeon GPU doesn't have any CUDA cores, so why to install it at all?
What Radeon GPUs have, are Stream Processors, and while the end result is same to CUDA cores, the architecture and design is completely different.
I've meant that I installed 1060 because of CUDA, which I need to run a specific AI(also 1060 working faster in some app's than my RX) and also for some recording. Also sound issues gone after I've left my pc off for the night. And yeah, I know that I could buy better GPU, but I've lost all of my money on this piece of red sht in February(and i bought it only cause it costed a less than rtx3060 and I wanted to try amd gpu's(dissapointed in this shtty gpu's)).
But anyway, thanks for the advice,even thought it hasn't helped at all
 

Aeacus

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I wanted to try amd gpu's(dissapointed in this shtty gpu's)).
It's well known that Radeon GPUs, despite offering better pricing, compared to Nvidia GPUs, have plenty of other issues. Namely far higher power draw, are hotter running and Radeon drivers also have far more issues than Nvidia drivers. So, the money you saved initially when buying a GPU, will be gone by running the GPU + troubleshooting the issues it may have.

But anyway, thanks for the advice,even thought it hasn't helped at all
Well, what do you expect? That we can magically make all your issues go away? Despite you should be knowing better not to install two or more GPUs in the same system, from completely different manufacturers (Radeon and Nvidia). Throw in Intel ARC GPU as well, to complete the GPU zoo.

Long past are the days of SLI or Crossfire. Nowadays, multiple-GPU system is only for workstation use, that needs the GPU compute power for number crunching/rendering. And even then, issues can arise, where two or more identical GPUs doesn't want to work together. Mining rigs are another instance where multiple GPUs are used in the same system.

Now, if you would have two Crossfire compatible Radeon GPUs (e.g HD 7750), or two SLI compatible GTX GPUs (e.g GTX 1070), with the SLI/Crossifre bridge, then MAYBE it would be worth the effort to make two GPUs to play together. Still, even with Crossfire/SLI in a dual-GPU system, GPUs power draw and heat output is doubled, while performance gain is ~50% increased, if even that. And most games don't support Crossfire/SLI to begin with.
Of course, Crossfire/SLI has their own downsides as well. E.g you can't use Crossfire in borderless window. You have to use full screen. While with SLI, you have to use identical GPUs and on some instances, it can actually hurt the performance (getting lower FPS than using only one GPU).

AMD ended official support for Crossfire back in 2017. Nvidia has held on SLI for longer, phasing it out by 1st dropping 3-way SLI support with the launch of RTX 2000 series (keeping only 2-way SLI support) and dropping it all together with RTX 3000 series release. So, SLI is also dead.

Just because you want dual-GPU system, doesn't mean it's viable or even possible.


On an analogy; it's like mixing gasoline with diesel, where one wants the acceleration of gasoline but the torque of diesel. And when the engine doesn't work right, if at all, complaining starts.
 

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