Question Massive loop planning.

May 20, 2019
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Hi, I have tried and tried to plan this, but i can't decide. So this here loop that i am planning is on a whole 'Nother caliber.

I've got on my motherboard this 9980xe, it's kinda a mistake (7980xe better choice) but i'm rolling with it. also got an Aorus xtreme edition 2080ti (GV-N208TAORUS X-11GC )
which does NOT use the reference PCB. Finding a block for this sucker was a mess already, but i found one nonetheless. I have a View 71 TG so space is no problem. In the front i've got a 420mm rad possiblity as well as on the top, lower can be a 240mm but it's currently populated by my PSU cables (no shroud, too many so they make a "clump" before they enter backside)
so lower side is just a 120mm, exhaust also just a 120mm. What's the plan: 2 420mm radiators (top, front) 2 120mm radiators (exhaust, lower) the aqua computer cuplex kryos next vario for cpu block, phanteks glacier 2080ti aorus block and the ek aorus backplate, i'm going hard tubes by the way. Now first of all i do not know if this quad radiator loop will work, second: the question is should i get a Pump-reservoir combo, 1 res and 1 standalone pump, or my favourite option: 2 D5 pumps and reasonably big res. Only way to mount pumps and reservoir are by screwing them on fans, bottom fan has clearance so i can have a big res if it supports 120mm fan mounting.

Cooling experts: please help me out. I do not know if 2 pumps is a good idea, and i don't know if 4 rads is a good idea, i don't even know if this loop as a whole is a good idea, but i want to embark on the quest of reaching 5ghz on 18 cores. Is it possible, should i do it, how many pumps,

(quick edit, it's all copper or nickel plated copper)
thanks in advance, have a good one.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
So, why do you need more than the dual 420mm radiators? This is a CPU + GPU loop (only), correct?

Just one of these is probably enough.

I run a 9700k and a GTX 2080 on dual EK PE 240mm rads and a single D5 pump/res combo.

BTW...reservoir size doesn't gain you anything other than holding more coolant.
 
May 20, 2019
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Correct, but it's 18 cores (trying to oc to 5ghz) and a 2080ti, yeah i that's why i asked, maybe adding the 120mm rads will push my performance for a bit and help, if that's not the case then i wont do that. yeah res size doesn't do much but i'd go with a bigger one for looks at this point, going for a short one kind of looks goofy in this tall case.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Adding the 120mm rads isn't going to net you much of anything over a dual 420mm setup. I would recommend just setting those 120mm slots with fans for airflow instead.

Reservoir size is only for aesthetics, so that's user choice.
 
May 20, 2019
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Hmm, k. Well any little squeeze out to help me achieve the 5 ghz i want won't go unnoticed. Ah yes does actually putting rads on the fans handicap the airflow, never heard bout' that but if that is so it's probably a better idea to not put rads on them yes?, because my ram is not watercooled and neither are my vrms on the mob.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
RAM doesn't need watercooling.

VRM can be cooled if you choose a monoblock for the motherboard.

Ah yes does actually putting rads on the fans handicap the airflow, never heard bout' that but if that is so it's probably a better idea to not put rads on them yes?
Radiators will reduce a fan's rated airflow...you are forcing air through a radiator vs. open air. A radiator is more restrictive and will drop the airflow of any fan used on that radiator.
 
May 20, 2019
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oh no, i just realized, vrm temps could handicap cpu stablity/clock speeds so i'll probably have to buy sticky thermal pads and heatsinks to take care of that, and there are no monoblocks that i found for my motherboard (Rampage VI extreme omega). Oh and the block (Aqua computer cuplex kryos next vario) one of the most hardcore cpu blocks, i did some research and the most votes for the best cpu block temperature wise is that one. So if i do get a monoblock the vrms will also utilize the water to cool so less cpu cooling and i now have even more hesitation. oh god
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
oh no, i just realized, vrm temps could handicap cpu stablity/clock speeds so i'll probably have to buy sticky thermal pads and heatsinks to take care of that, and there are no monoblocks that i found for my motherboard (Rampage VI extreme omega).
So, you'd just use the normal motherboard heatsink instead...where does this thermal pad thing come in?

Oh and the block (Aqua computer cuplex kryos next vario) one of the most hardcore cpu blocks, i did some research and the most votes for the best cpu block temperature wise is that one.
Compared to....? And by how much difference? Most CPU blocks are within a few % and degrees C in performance. Also, not all will be an exact 1:1 for every CPU application.

So if i do get a monoblock the vrms will also utilize the water to cool so less cpu cooling and i now have even more hesitation. oh god
You said there wasn't a monoblock for your motherboard? And what about less CPU cooling and hesitation? This doesn't make sense.
 
May 20, 2019
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heavy overclocking, especially on 18 cores will require some type of vrm cooling. The thermal pad would come in if your mob didn't have a vrm heatsink so you make your own by sticking them on with a piece of copper or aluminum heatsink. I got it wrong, my mob actually has active vrm cooling so that's not a problem. My block was at most comparisons the best in terms of temperature, or at least one of the best. There actually was a monoblock for my mob but it didn't get most VRMs. I was hesitant because if my motherboard didn't have good vrm cooling making big loops and overclocks won't do as much so it wouldn't be worth it. sry 4 the confusion
 
May 20, 2019
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Heavy rendering, gaming w/ raytracing @ 1440p,
maybe sometime streaming, video editing and I also just wanna hit 5 Ghz with a practical cooling solution.
 

Carl2

Distinguished
Jan 31, 2010
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I have an intel 6 core processor, built it years ago and used an air cooler for the CPU that worked well enough. I started experimenting with Peltiers and just switched to the TEC1-12709 that takes 9 Amps instead of a 6 amp Peltier. It pulls down temps much quicker and has a CPU water block close to freezing in minutes. Peltiers can get the CPU down to below freezing temps in no time while water loops are limited to air temps. Maybe I'll get to a direct Peltier to CPU link in time rather than the pumps and radiator I now use, I'll still need the radiator and pump for the hot side though but I can eliminate the Pump for the CPU water block. I worked in electronics and had leds in the lab but it took decades for them to be useful in homes and automobiles.
 

rubix_1011

Contributing Writer
Moderator
Peltier's are a step up from normal watercooling and it sounds like the OP is still not yet familiar with that concept just yet.

We had someone on the forums a while back that went from watercooling to chilled water loops to TEC cooled loops. One thing he found was that once you went chilled coolant, you are better off removing the radiator from the equation since while it also removes thermal load from the loop, it also introduces ambient heat into the cooling loop.

If coolant temperature is > room temp, normal radiator is beneficial.
If coolant temperature is < room temp, normal radiator is detrimental.

A radiator is a heat exchanger and thermal loads will always benefit the region which will absorb the most thermal energy.
 

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