Question Memory making weird buzzing noise

Feb 11, 2021
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So I just had some work done on my pc, I had the back I/O panel removed so I could make room for other expansions, and it won’t boot anymore. The system makes a weird buzzing noise coming from the RAM.

It randomly chose to boot up once, but I wasn’t thinking and I tried to put my GPU in while it was running. There was a sparking noise, and it returned to that state.
I have tried:
Replacing all the memory
Unplugging my gpu and my usb 3.0 card
Switching power cables
Unplugging and plugging back in all of the PSU cables
Just repeatedly unplugging-plugging back in the power cord
My PC is an old HP rp-5800 with an i5-2400, GTX 1050 TI, 20GB ram, 1TB HDD, and a 240 watt PSU.
Please don’t comment on how bad my system is unless it’s helpful.
So what can I do?
 
Feb 11, 2021
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If my GPU was fried, would the fan on it still run?
If yes, then my GPU isn’t fried. For some odd reason, my monitor gives out power through the HDMI, and the fan runs, which leads me to believe it ain’t fried.
 
Feb 11, 2021
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Also, I blew all my money on this system, so I don’t think I can afford a new motherboard, because then I would need a new case considering my motherboards odd form factor and possibly a new CPU seeing how mine is 8 years old. I’ve only got 100 USD left and I’m really hoping it ain’t fried. I’ve got a suspicion that at the very least my motherboard still works, considering it continued doing the same thing it was before I attempted to put in the GPU.
 
Feb 11, 2021
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Why? The system won’t boot, and I already have onboard graphics that I know work, so what would the point even be?
 
Feb 11, 2021
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So it didn't work before.
You tried to put the GPU in while running, sparks result.
It still does not work.

Correct?
Almost.
It didn’t work before.
It randomly worked once.
I put in the GPU during the time that it had worked, and I hear a sparking noise, yet no sparks were seen. (Also, I forgot to say this, the system had power, but wasn’t booted.)
It now will not work.
 
Feb 11, 2021
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Swapping known good parts to isolate the defective/damaged parts is how you sort this out.
Yeah, the problem is that I don’t have any other parts. Only other PCs I have is an old crappy Gateway AIO and a new but equally crappy Acer laptop.
 

COLGeek

Cybernaut
Moderator
Yeah, the problem is that I don’t have any other parts. Only other PCs I have is an old crappy Gateway AIO and a new but equally crappy Acer laptop.
Might be time to see if anyone local to you has a dirt cheap offering on Craigslist in your area for the same make/model PC. In normal times, you can find those old HPs for next to nothing. Now, not sure...
 

Krotow

Commendable
Oct 2, 2019
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OP, go to craigslist or what you have around and get a new motherboard and GPU. I know, usable GPU for not exorbitant price is nearly mission impossible at today, but seems you are not in position to choose.
 

carocuore

Proper
Jan 24, 2021
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I tried to put my GPU in while it was running. There was a sparking noise, and it returned to that state.


Oof, probably something fried in the mobo, I dare to say the CPU and other parts are most likely fine, knew a guy who did the same and his GPU was still working, it was an old one though, geforce 7800, there's no way to tell unless you have tools and a slot tester, if something's damaged repairing it can be complicated af, even more if it's a small IC or SMD cap/resistor. it's doable if the mobo is worth enough and the traces inside aren't damaged, I'd say you look for a specialized technician and try your luck.
I bought a 'dead' GPU for $10, replaced a couple of burnt capacitors and it's working perfectly fine
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Unplug everything. All drives, all connectors, mouse, kb, everything. Remove the gpu entirely, leave only 1 stick of ram in the 2nd slot, any power leads from the psu to the motherboard, and the cpu fan.

Then try and boot. If it fails, try the other stick of ram instead. If it still bleeps then there's 3 possible things gone bad.
  1. Both sticks of ram.
  2. Cpu.
  3. Motherboard.
If you have the ability to test the ram, do so.

Assume it is broken/fried until you can prove it works. Do not guess or assume anything works because it used to or booted up once.

If it boots and doesn't bleep, add 1 item at a time and reboot in between. That means add the other ram stick, reboot, mouse, reboot, kb, reboot, monitor cable, reboot, monitor, reboot.

Save any storage for last and the gpu for absolute last. You don't want to boot to windows, just POST to bios.

Keep adding items until you get the failure repeated then pull that item and reboot
 

Krotow

Commendable
Oct 2, 2019
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Fun fact - PCIe is hotpluggable by design. However it doesn't matter, because hotplugging suport depends solely from adapter card manufacturer. And I wouldn't dare to pull out working PCI card with 70W+ power demand anyway without powering it down somewhat before removing. Old electrical engineering truth - if it sparks where it must not to then expect trouble. So GPU or motherboard or both very likely are gone.
 
Feb 11, 2021
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Unplug everything. All drives, all connectors, mouse, kb, everything. Remove the gpu entirely, leave only 1 stick of ram in the 2nd slot, any power leads from the psu to the motherboard, and the cpu fan.

Then try and boot. If it fails, try the other stick of ram instead. If it still bleeps then there's 3 possible things gone bad.
  1. Both sticks of ram.
  2. Cpu.
  3. Motherboard.
If you have the ability to test the ram, do so.

Assume it is broken/fried until you can prove it works. Do not guess or assume anything works because it used to or booted up once.

If it boots and doesn't bleep, add 1 item at a time and reboot in between. That means add the other ram stick, reboot, mouse, reboot, kb, reboot, monitor cable, reboot, monitor, reboot.

Save any storage for last and the gpu for absolute last. You don't want to boot to windows, just POST to bios.

Keep adding items until you get the failure repeated then pull that item and reboot
This is a motherboard issue. I know it is now. Do you think there would be any hope for it if I send it to a repair shop?
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
No. There's generally only 1 kind of repair that ever gets done on a motherboard and that's a recap, where they replace all those barrel shaped caps. Other than that, when a motherboard gets toasted its next to impossible to actually fix unless you already know exactly which component is the issue.

Repair shops generally charge @ $100 for the first hour, and anywhere from $50 to $100 per hour or part of.

Which makes a $50 motherboard a disposable item.

Repair shops generally diagnose issues and replace the offending part, because it's cheaper for you and is less time for them, greater turnover = more money for them. That and almost all do not have either the right tools or the electronics engineering to actually find what's toasted.

They can fix your pc, get it working like brand new, BUT exactly whether that's going to be worth the cost to do so is a different story. If the bill would be $500 before taxes, it'd be far cheaper for you to just replace all the parts yourself with newer and better instead of fixing old and busted.
 
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