Microsoft Details Making USB 3.0 Great in Windows 8

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burnley14

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Way to jump on board, Microsoft. Honestly file transfer speeds are the single greatest bottleneck in today's systems. Processing power is sufficient in almost every instance, integrated graphics (either fusion or Intel HD) is enough for 99% of tasks, and even boot-up and responsiveness can be drastically improved with SSDs if HDDs aren't cutting it. But file transferring is still behind the pack.
Even with USB 3.0, transferring files is one of the few things that I actually have to sit and wait for more than a few seconds for my computer to complete. The industry really needs to push this forward, USB 4.0 needs to happen within just a few years.
 

chickenhoagie

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[citation][nom]sithtis[/nom]i dont really get it... i have USB3 on my Windows 7... what is the big deal with this[/citation]
i think the point here is that Microsoft implemented a better software protocol stack for USB3.0 to speed up the transfer rates of 3.0 devices. In other words, USB3.0 is going to perform better in Windows 8 than it will in Windows 7.
 

alidan

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usb has at least in these videos, become something that out classes hdds speed.

what i mean is a normal hdd if im not wrong, will not saturate a 3.0 line
ssds yes, hdd no

so for now, at least for me, usb has become fast enough. when an ssd becomes a viable storage device, as in 1tb portable, than usb will need a another boost. key word there is NEED. you can want if faster but you dont need it.
 

pbrigido

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I was not really looking forward to Win8, but after a couple of months of information slowing leaking out about it, I am warming up to it. I can't help but think in the back of my mind that Win8 coupled with IvyBridge on a tablet might be the thing that finally gets me into the tablet market. Everything else doesn't do it for me.
 

SteelCity1981

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[citation][nom]chickenhoagie[/nom]i think the point here is that Microsoft implemented a better software protocol stack for USB3.0 to speed up the transfer rates of 3.0 devices. In other words, USB3.0 is going to perform better in Windows 8 than it will in Windows 7.[/citation]

And they couldn't do this with Windows 7? Windows 7 Sp1 was suppose to have software protocol to natively support USB 3.0 if you recall and the Microsoft but decided to ditch support for it in Sp1.
 

CaedenV

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[citation][nom]alidan[/nom]usb has at least in these videos, become something that out classes hdds speed.what i mean is a normal hdd if im not wrong, will not saturate a 3.0 linessds yes, hdd noso for now, at least for me, usb has become fast enough. when an ssd becomes a viable storage device, as in 1tb portable, than usb will need a another boost. key word there is NEED. you can want if faster but you dont need it.[/citation]
Indeed, most HDDs will burst at 150-200MB/s and sustain at 80-130MB/s, USB3 transfers at a 'theoretical' 625MB/s, which will out-class even some of the fastest SSD drives on the market. The big problem I see is that most devices used on USB are printers and flash drives, both of which are painfully slow and dont even max out USB2, so I see most of this bandwidth going to waste, with the exception of power users.
 

joeman42_43

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So when will these retards fix the Windows 7 file transfer over LAN which prevents a Windows 7 system from acting as a file server if you need anything over 2 MB/sec. Windows XP had no problem with it.
 

ojas

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If i saw the video correctly, then there was a SSD involved in this demo. I don't see HDDs doing the same speeds.

[citation][nom]caedenv[/nom]Indeed, most HDDs will burst at 150-200MB/s and sustain at 80-130MB/s, USB3 transfers at a 'theoretical' 625MB/s, which will out-class even some of the fastest SSD drives on the market. The big problem I see is that most devices used on USB are printers and flash drives, both of which are painfully slow and dont even max out USB2, so I see most of this bandwidth going to waste, with the exception of power users.[/citation]

I agree with you there. This is a good thing they've done, but the demo is not a worst-case scenario. I don't know if flash drives or HDDs can match these speeds...
 
Our customers have grown accustomed to expecting new versions of Windows to work with their existing devices and drivers.
Devices, yes. Drivers, if only that were true. So much waiting for Win7 drivers, or 64-bit drivers. I can even see a good reason for this. For efficiency, the driver is specific to the hardware and the OS. If we went through a generic interface layer, we would lose efficiency and therefore speed. Reminds me of the major bit*h against Java - it's universal, the compiled code is portable, but it's slower than native code or microcode optimized for the platform.
 

Djhg2000

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"all were originally designed to work with Windows PCs"

Right, except for Apple devices which were designed to work with Mac OS.

There are also a few devices designed to rely on actual USB standards so that they wouldn't need to include a frisbee more outdated than the concept of throwing a piece of plastic to entertain your dogs face.
 
I'm sitting here looking at my personal pc. I have USB ports on the motherboard, on the rear I/O panel, and on the front of the pc case. However, I do not have any USB devices plugged into any of the ports. LOL!
 

chickenhoagie

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[citation][nom]SteelCity1981[/nom]And they couldn't do this with Windows 7? Windows 7 Sp1 was suppose to have software protocol to natively support USB 3.0 if you recall and the Microsoft but decided to ditch support for it in Sp1.[/citation]
no need to get snappy with me budd. I was just stating what the article was about.
 
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I get a BSOD in Windows 7 when using certain USB2 devices in a USB3 port. Now, certain people would say that it's the chipset manufacturer's fault for shoddy drivers, etc... However, that argument is flawed because:

It works fine in Linux,
It works fine in XP,
It works fine in a USB2 port and
Only a complete turd of an OS couldn't properly handle USB problems without having to halt the system, even if it was the driver's fault.
 

alextheblue

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[citation][nom]windoze_surver_USB3[/nom]I get a BSOD in Windows 7 when using certain USB2 devices in a USB3 port. Now, certain people would say that it's the chipset manufacturer's fault for shoddy drivers, etc... However, that argument is flawed because:It works fine in Linux, It works fine in XP,It works fine in a USB2 port andOnly a complete turd of an OS couldn't properly handle USB problems without having to halt the system, even if it was the driver's fault.[/citation]
Does it use identical drivers across Linux, XP, and Win7? No. So you can't rule out drivers. Try it on a different Win7 box with an altogether different USB3 chipset, if possible.
 

SteelCity1981

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[citation][nom]chickenhoagie[/nom]no need to get snappy with me budd. I was just stating what the article was about.[/citation]

Wasn't getting snappy. Take a chill pill.
 
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