Modems,Routers &ISP beginner questions

Sep 16, 2018
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Hi there. I'm looking to move in with a friend in the near future, into a pretty small house. It'll more than likely be just us two, with two PS4's and maybe two gaming computers at some point.
I was looking at buying a Netgear AC1750 (R6400-100NAS) router, but I've no idea how networks actually work, so my question(s) are:
-Would this router support 200+MBPS speeds for all systems on LAN?
-Would a good modem be required, if so, what's recommended?
-How does an ISP's service affect your router's speeds? (This router supposedly has a potential of 450+1300 Mbps, but my ISP's plan only has the potential of 300mbps download.) Would I need to upgrade my plan as well?
-Part two of that question (or technically three), what is the reason behind saying "450+1300 mbps" instead of just 1750? Is 450 the minimum or something?

Thank you for any time spared answering my beginner questions :)
 
Your first step is to find out what modems work with the ISP plans. There will be lists of modems that support each plan level based on where you live. There is no fixed answer to this question.

The router in general will have no issues running on that connection. Using ethenet ports most mid priced or better routers can transfer a full gigabit of traffic.

The key confusion is the massive lies they tell on the wifi side. The 450+1300 means you can connect a device on the 2.4g radio at 450mbps and a second device on the 5g radio at 1300. No single device can use both radios. In addition those numbers are some perfect world lab number that does ignores important details like a router need to both transmit and receive. You will get only a small fraction of those numbers.

That does not mean routers with bigger number run better. Your end device are 1/2 the connection. So even if you were to buy some fancy router that could use 4 antenna feeds your end device likely only has 2 antenna so it will drop back to the slower speed. Even on the router you propose it may not help. To get 450 they use 3 overlapping feeds at 150. If your end device only has 2 antenna you are limited to 300mbps.
 
Your first step is to find out what modems work with the ISP plans. There will be lists of modems that support each plan level based on where you live. There is no fixed answer to this question.

The router in general will have no issues running on that connection. Using ethenet ports most mid priced or better routers can transfer a full gigabit of traffic.

The key confusion is the massive lies they tell on the wifi side. The 450+1300 means you can connect a device on the 2.4g radio at 450mbps and a second device on the 5g radio at 1300. No single device can use both radios. In addition those numbers are some perfect world lab number that does ignores important details like a router need to both transmit and receive. You will get only a small fraction of those numbers.

That does not mean routers with bigger number run better. Your end device are 1/2 the connection. So even if you were to buy some fancy router that could use 4 antenna feeds your end device likely only has 2 antenna so it will drop back to the slower speed. Even on the router you propose it may not help. To get 450 they use 3 overlapping feeds at 150. If your end device only has 2 antenna you are limited to 300mbps.
 

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