Question Molex to SATA questions

Dec 28, 2020
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I want to add a SSD to my parent's office PC (https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c02479654) for a faster boot. Problem is that both the SATA cables are used for a HDD and an optical disk drive. What concerns me is that both the SATA cables are run through a Molex to SATA adapter (but this computer has been running for almost a decade).

What's the best way of adding a SSD (the third SATA connection) to this PC? The power supply is pretty old so it doesn't have the modern SATA connections. Would it be feasible to add a SATA splitter on the end of a Molex to SATA adapter, or use a third Molex to SATA adapter? Trying not to cause a fire because i've heard about Molex SATA adapters lol.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Straight up, ANY power supply that is so old that it doesn't have SATA power connectors should be IMMEDIATELY replaced, because it is old enough that it poses a serious hazard for failure of one kind or another including potentially short circuit, fire, excessive current draw or any number of failures that could result in damage to other hardware.

Yes, molex to "anything" adapters are generally frowned upon. I'd really recommend that you simply replace this power supply with a much more modern unit.

Any idea what the model of this power supply is? There should be a label on the side of the PSU with the model and specifications printed on it. Or if you know the exact model and sub model if it's a prebuilt system, that might be enough as well.

Either way, any power supply that old is WELL past not only it's real world expiration date, but definitely beyond the age at which it could ever have reasonably considered "safe".

I'd assume this was an OEM style unit, and probably a rather cheap one to begin with, and that simply compounds the issue making it potentially even more problematic, especially when you start slapping unintended adapters on it.
 
Reactions: Nemesia
Dec 28, 2020
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10
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Straight up, ANY power supply that is so old that it doesn't have SATA power connectors should be IMMEDIATELY replaced, because it is old enough that it poses a serious hazard for failure of one kind or another including potentially short circuit, fire, excessive current draw or any number of failures that could result in damage to other hardware.

Yes, molex to "anything" adapters are generally frowned upon. I'd really recommend that you simply replace this power supply with a much more modern unit.

Any idea what the model of this power supply is? There should be a label on the side of the PSU with the model and specifications printed on it. Or if you know the exact model and sub model if it's a prebuilt system, that might be enough as well.

Either way, any power supply that old is WELL past not only it's real world expiration date, but definitely beyond the age at which it could ever have reasonably considered "safe".

I'd assume this was an OEM style unit, and probably a rather cheap one to begin with, and that simply compounds the issue making it potentially even more problematic, especially when you start slapping unintended adapters on it.
I happen to have a spare PSU it's a Raidmax RX-500XT it has SATA connections on it. I would have to get a new case because it doesn't fit in the current HP Pavilion tower. My issue now is a few questions:

1) Is the PSU compatible with the rest of the system? The motherboard appears to have the 24pin motherboard connection and a 4pin CPU power but not sure how backwards compatible modern PSUs are to older hardware

2) The motherboard is a uATX form. Does this fit in an ATX case( will the standoffs align).

Very much appreciated
 
I want to add a SSD to my parent's office PC (https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c02479654) for a faster boot. Problem is that both the SATA cables are used for a HDD and an optical disk drive. What concerns me is that both the SATA cables are run through a Molex to SATA adapter (but this computer has been running for almost a decade).

What's the best way of adding a SSD (the third SATA connection) to this PC? The power supply is pretty old so it doesn't have the modern SATA connections. Would it be feasible to add a SATA splitter on the end of a Molex to SATA adapter, or use a third Molex to SATA adapter? Trying not to cause a fire because i've heard about Molex SATA adapters lol.
Yes, for that purpose it's quite safe, it may be a problem if Molex is adapted to let's say power a GPU, but HDDs and specially SSDs use very little power.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Sigh.

So, Raidmax is pretty horrible when it comes to the quality and performance of their power supplies. That might not be AS big of a deal since this is likely a very low powered system, but the amount of power the system draws is rather unimportant if the power supply itself is just simply problematic. In fact, Raidmax is definitely on my list of "don't use" models. They do have like one or two halfway decent models out there but they are not common, they are expensive and they are not THAT unit that you have.


Even so, if this unit hasn't seen much use it MIGHT be ok for use with a relatively low power draw configuration.

What kind of hardware is this system running?

What is the model of this system, if you know?

Is this some kind of small form factor PC, and that is why the PSU wouldn't fit? Because if that's the case then the system is likely not going to fit elsewhere either. uATX is basically the same as micro ATX (mATX), but, often companies like Dell and HP use boards from companies like Foxcon, etc., and have the boards made specifically for their proprietary systems and do things like flip the rear I/O upside down so that the PCI slots are at the top and the I/O ports are at the bottom, rather the other way around like most non-proprietary boards are. Or they have other proprietary connectors like goofy power plugs.

If the I/O is normal on yours and everything is a normal configuration same as any other micro ATX board, THEN you might be able to get away with moving things to a different case but depending on the hardware it might be better to simply find a same form factor replacement that is just newer and has the necessary connectors and will fit in place without having to move everything and buy a different case.

Again, knowing the model of the system and/or the PSU itself would help to determine that, or not.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Yes, for that purpose it's quite safe, it may be a problem if Molex is adapted to let's say power a GPU, but HDDs and specially SSDs use very little power.
I don't agree. Emphatically. Any power supply that is so old that it lacks SATA connectors is too old to still be in use and be safe. Period.

Especially when it is likely not only VERY OLD, but was also probably relatively low quality to begin with.
 
I don't agree. Emphatically. Any power supply that is so old that it lacks SATA connectors is too old to still be in use and be safe. Period.

Especially when it is likely not only VERY OLD, but was also probably relatively low quality to begin with.
Age of it is different question but any certainly has some spare power for couple of HDDs/SSDs.
I also have Raidmax Silent Power 660W that is 5 years+ old, works like a charm and still powering my (often very overclocked) present system.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
The PSU in question, that has the adapters installed, is not a Raidmax. That is what he has that he COULD install, but he'd have to get a different case in order to do it.

Any power supply that came with any prebuilt system that is old enough to have not come with SATA connectors, is more than ten years old. Any system that is more than ten years old needs to have the power supply replaced, no matter WHAT brand or model it is. If it was a Seasonic X that was ten years of more old, I'd STILL tell him it needs to be replaced, so knowing it is likely some cheap brand OEM POS, there can't really be any argument that it's not safe to continue running and definitely not safe to add ADDITIONAL hardware to, on top of what it's already running while creeping along in it's wheelchair or walker.
 
Dec 28, 2020
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10
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Sigh.

So, Raidmax is pretty horrible when it comes to the quality and performance of their power supplies. That might not be AS big of a deal since this is likely a very low powered system, but the amount of power the system draws is rather unimportant if the power supply itself is just simply problematic. In fact, Raidmax is definitely on my list of "don't use" models. They do have like one or two halfway decent models out there but they are not common, they are expensive and they are not THAT unit that you have.


Even so, if this unit hasn't seen much use it MIGHT be ok for use with a relatively low power draw configuration.

What kind of hardware is this system running?

What is the model of this system, if you know?

Is this some kind of small form factor PC, and that is why the PSU wouldn't fit? Because if that's the case then the system is likely not going to fit elsewhere either. uATX is basically the same as micro ATX (mATX), but, often companies like Dell and HP use boards from companies like Foxcon, etc., and have the boards made specifically for their proprietary systems and do things like flip the rear I/O upside down so that the PCI slots are at the top and the I/O ports are at the bottom, rather the other way around like most non-proprietary boards are. Or they have other proprietary connectors like goofy power plugs.

If the I/O is normal on yours and everything is a normal configuration same as any other micro ATX board, THEN you might be able to get away with moving things to a different case but depending on the hardware it might be better to simply find a same form factor replacement that is just newer and has the necessary connectors and will fit in place without having to move everything and buy a different case.

Again, knowing the model of the system and/or the PSU itself would help to determine that, or not.
I agree Raidmax isn't the best option but it is most definitely better than the near decade old one in the PC right now. I linked the PC in the original post but it's this https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c02479654, rocking an AMD Athlon II X4 820 and a 200W PSU (I can open the PC tomorrow to check the exact model). The PC is only being used for browsing and Microsoft Office applications. The PC will be using the integrated graphics and i'm not planning on making any pricy upgrades just looking to add a SSD. I can also source a mid tower ATX case from my cousin for free so I won't need to buy it. Good catch on the IO, i'll have to make sure it's not upside down or anything.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
That sounds very much like what I just did for my sister. Planning to upgrade her to an i3-10100 next week but this was just to get her by for now, since I had that old system sitting in a box, an old Athlon quad core (Can't remember the model), that was better than her Athlon dual core that was on the way out. Swapped out her 200w PSU (Yes, it was an HP system as well) for a (Serious flinch here) Thermaltake TR2 600w which is a terrible power supply, but is never going to see even probably a 100w load from that system and will only be in there for about a week until I swap that out for a Corsair CX450.

So, much the same, except that you intend to run the Raidmax unit for some indeterminate amount of time, and I'd probably agree that it's mostly ok. That's not a great unit, but, it's also probably not a dumpster fire either.

The SSD upgrade should make a big difference as well.
 

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