Question Motherboard For Overclocking

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
The Asus ROG boards can handle upto a 5950x without issue, the VRM's are plenty good for that. Being a Ryzen, OC is next to pointless anyway, amd already sets a good performance level on the cpus, very little headroom for better. Far better to undervolt the cpu, get better temps and better boosts, which bumps performance vs just adding the multiplier like it's an intel.

The biggest difference between the B450, x470, B550 and x570 mobo's is pcie4.0 use or lack thereof and ram spec capabilities. If using nvidia and Gen3 sata/nvme storage with 3200MHz ram, there's realistically no difference at all other than some ports changes for USB.
 
Last edited:
Oct 1, 2021
7
0
10
0
The Asus ROG boards can handle upto a 5950x without issue, the VRM's are plenty good for that. Being a Ryzen, OC is next to pointless anyway, AMD already sets a good performance level on the cpus, very little headroom for better. Far better to undervolt the cpu, get better temps and better boosts, which bumps performance vs just adding the multiplier like it's an intel.
i kinda don't understand what you mean (and also I'm kinda new that these motherboard things), but I just feel that the AMD potency is not coming out if I'm not overclocking it. I'm currently using Ryzen 2600x with medium OC, and the temperature are pretty good so far, 39c-45c ( on idle ), and 50c-62c ( on gaming&rendering )
 
i kinda don't understand what you mean (and also I'm kinda new that these motherboard things), but I just feel that the AMD potency is not coming out if I'm not overclocking it. I'm currently using Ryzen 2600x with medium OC, and the temperature are pretty good so far, 39c-45c ( on idle ), and 50c-62c ( on gaming&rendering )
I am not sure on b450 but on x570 the 5xxx auto step / auto overclock pretty dang high if the temps are good. A few of the technology YouTube channels like gamers nexus proved there was no gains really to be made with overclocking them manually and sometimes it hurt performance.

View: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kcr8mSBXLrU&ab_channel=TechProfis
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Everything I've heard says turn on PBO and call it a day. Most overclocks end up hurting single core performance which is not good for games. If you are always using your CPU for workstation tasks, than an all core overclock makes more sense.
 
Oct 1, 2021
7
0
10
0
I am not sure on b450 but on x570 the 5xxx auto step / auto overclock pretty dang high if the temps are good. A few of the technology YouTube channels like gamers nexus proved there was no gains really to be made with overclocking them manually and sometimes it hurt performance.
i just feel 3.7ghz is not enough for me tho :(
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
You aren't likely to see 3.7Ghz base clock unless you are running a full load on the stock cooler. Under most normal circumstances the stock boost clock is 4.6Ghz, so most games will hover around 4.4 to 4.6Ghz.
 
Oct 1, 2021
7
0
10
0
You aren't likely to see 3.7Ghz base clock unless you are running a full load on the stock cooler. Under most normal circumstances the stock boost clock is 4.6Ghz, so most games will hover around 4.4 to 4.6Ghz.
ohh, so it'll increase the clock speed itself even I'm not overclocking when I'm gaming or do something? sorry for the many questions that I've made, but I'm really new at these things, when 3 yrs ago, I don't really care about speed clock, core, and any of these things, but now I just realize it all gives an effect on what you do. and btw the cooler I'm using is not a stock cooler so yeah
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
Base clock is rarely ever seen, even with Intels. Unless you turn off turbo.

Ryzen aren't Intel, whatever you are used to with 'Intel logical OC', throw out the window, it's useless. It Ryzens are dynamic cpus that use load%, core amount, voltages and temps to determine boost clocks. All are variable. The worst thing you can do to a Ryzen is set the voltage static. 1 core might use 1.4v to get 4.6GHz, but all core might only use 1.25v and top out at 4.2GHz. Setting a static voltage of 1.25v will kill single core performance, limiting its power use, but setting 1.4v static to get max boost on single and all core will burn out the cpu.

Higher voltages means higher temps and Ryzens will protect themselves. As temps climb, they'll back off on boost clocks, so don't need the voltage either. Which lowers temps.

So the best thing you can do is get a decent cooler, and Undervolt the cpu as is. Lower voltage requirements per clock, core, load, mean lower temps, allowing the cpu to max boost on more cores. If you could get voltage all core down from 1.25v to 1.13v, you'd see boosts of 4.4GHz instead of 4.2GHz.

Wattage is power, power = voltage x amperage. As voltage lowers, demand for amperage raises to compensate and keep the cpu TDP. This is where PBO applies, it can raise amperage limits beyond stock. Of course if the cpu doesn't reach the stock amperage limits, using PBO becomes pointless.

Using Ryzen Master + PBO + 200MHz bump, I got all core 4.4GHz at 83°C for a Cinebench R20 score of 4716. Using CTR2 to find my lowest stable voltages, I got 4.2GHz all core, 4.4GHz 4 core, 67°C and a CbR20 score of 5010 and single thread performance was over 60 points higher than using PBO.

Got better performance with lower voltage, even a lower cpu speed all core, and much lower cpu temps as a result.

Ryzens are an efficiency engine. The more efficient you can make it, the better it performs and the more you can get out of it.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS