Question Motherboard resets but doesnt turn off pc

Aug 26, 2022
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I have a recent built pc that seems to be operating sub par. M motherboard does a wierd reset of sorts. My USB devices all reset as well RGB lighting on my cpu and gpu. I can't figure out why.


Current build


ASUS ROG Crosshair VIII Dark Hero
Ryzen 9 5950x
EVGA FTW3 GeForce RTX 3080 Ti
EVGA Supernova 1300 G+, 80+ Gold 1300W, Fully Modular
Hydro x series water cooled. Cpu, EK-Quantum Vector FTW3 RTX 3080/3090 D-RGB and active backplate
2 360mm radiators, 6 fans, one pump.
 
Not much to go on here...

How is it sub-par and what is the standard you're measuring against?

Have you installed an OS? How are you resetting it?

Do you mean restart from within the OS? or pressing the reset button on the case?

You might check your BIOS carefully for settings that change behaviour of reset and restart. The Hero boards are targeted for a competition overclocking market that will likely use LN2 for overclocking. They may want different reset behaviour in an extreme overclock and cold temperature.
 
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Aug 26, 2022
25
0
30
0
T
Not much to go on here...

How is it sub-par and what is the standard you're measuring against?

Have you installed an OS? How are you resetting it?

Do you mean restart from within the OS? or pressing the reset button on the case?

You might check your BIOS carefully for settings that change behaviour of reset and restart. The Hero boards are targeted for a competition overclocking market that will likely use LN2 for overclocking. They may want different reset behaviour in an extreme overclock and cold temperature.
The sub par is that all the minor devices on it restart randomly. Without the pc actually turning off. The internet speeds also spike.
 
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The sub par is that all the minor devices on it restart randomly. Without the pc actually turning off. The internet speeds also spike.
Internet speed is just as likely to be other traffic. I noticed my network was a bit slow and spiky downloading a large game update earlier.

Have you updated your BIOS? to the latest. There was a problem with USB drop-outs with earlier BIOS' that have been fixed. It was common across all AM4 boards with 5000 (and maybe 3000) series processors. When you update be sure to reset CMOS after to force the CPU to retrain memory.
 
Aug 26, 2022
25
0
30
0
Internet speed is just as likely to be other traffic. I noticed my network was a bit slow and spiky downloading a large game update earlier.

Have you updated your BIOS? to the latest. There was a problem with USB drop-outs with earlier BIOS' that have been fixed. It was common across all AM4 boards with 5000 (and maybe 3000) series processors. When you update be sure to reset CMOS after to force the CPU to retrain memory.
I thought it may be traffic but my router was spitting out 900+mbps and my phones wifi had higher speeds. I did update bios with the latest version on the asus website. I didn't reset CMOS when I did it though.

Also any advice on getting the knowledge required to troubleshoot and diagnose onputers and their components?
 
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Also any advice on getting the knowledge required to troubleshoot and diagnose onputers and their components?
Some coursework... basic and intermediate (at least) electronics along with with PC/micro-computer theory and repair will help get you theory. Having a solid grasp of electronics theory at least is really important, and also a bit of physics. Much of the so-called advice you see posted is clearly misguided because it ignores basic laws of thermodynamics, for instance.

The other thing you gain from coursework like that is it gets you into an engineering mindset. That is this: in engineering you're trained to look at a big problem and take it apart turning it into small, easy to solve problems instead of one big hard one.

And practical experience poking around on multiple computers so get yourself some old/used, even broken, ones and upgrade them piece by piece...or swap components between them and figure out why it won't work. In the end, 90% of troubleshooting anything comes from experience informed by theory. Nobody starts with the experience though so you need a sold grasp of the theory to wade through all the possibilities before experience helps you focus on the most likely one at the very first.

Having more knowledgeable friends or co-workers is always good but if you don't have that then reading through tech forums is useful. There are some youtube channels that are also pretty useful to watch: one is Greg Salazar. He has this series called "fix or flop" where he gets one of his viewer's PC's that's broken or messed up and "fixes" it. You'll see how he works through the problem discovery and troubleshooting. He may not be the best at it but he gets results and he explains why he's doing what he's doing.
 
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