Question My cpu drops the speed to cool down.

Aug 3, 2020
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My cpu drops my speed to cool down to 60 degrees and then lets the speed to go back to normal and temperature goes up again to like 75, and the cpu does the same process over and over. Because of that when i'm playing in a game, my fps drops to 30, when cpu drops the speed. And after fps goes back to normal , till temperature reaches 75 degrees again. It's almost unreal to play any games.

My cpu :

AMD Ryzen 3500u



Speed drops from 2.2 Ghz to 1.4



Is there any way to disable that feature in my cpu?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
No, and you wouldn't want to if you could. It's the only thing that's keeping it from reaching dangerous temperatures. It's SUPPOSED to do that, if the thermal response requires it. Normally we'd say it's because you need to get better cooling, but since this is a laptop, you can't upgrade the cooling. Play less demanding games or increase the graphic quality settings to reduce the load on the CPU.

This is EXACTLY why choosing a laptop for gaming making zero sense. This isn't new. This has been a problem for as long as people have been trying to game on laptops, especially on laptops that weren't specifically designed to be used for gaming.

If you want to game at a high level without problems on a PC, then it would be advisable to get a desktop system.
 
Reactions: CountMike

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'd really like to say yes, it will help, but the truth is, it won't. The problem is that those coolers really only help to cool the case surface of the laptop, which makes it more comfortable for your hands to be on it. When it comes to the CPU, the heat is happening at the core level, and no external cooler is going to do anything to change what is happening there unless it is a sub zero refrigerated unit that is pumping refrigerated air into the intake vent for the CPU cooler, and that's a bad idea because of moisture.

Turning up the AC in the room so that the ambient temperature is a bit lower, might help a LITTLE bit, and one of those cooling stations might add to that, a LITTLE bit, but overall it is a design issue, and these types of units were just usually not designed to be used for hardcore gaming or even casual but high end gaming for long extended periods. In some cases, they weren't designed to be used for gaming AT ALL.

Very important that you don't use the unit while it is sitting on carpet, or your legs, or blankets, or anything else that might block the air intake vents. And if possible, adding some rubber blocks to each bottom corner to raise it up slightly off the surface of the table or desk probably won't hurt either.
 
Aug 3, 2020
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The truth is, that I've had a laptop that is a LOT weaker than this one, and i played some games that i play on this one, and I've never encountered that big of a problem with overheating.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That is because it WAS weaker. Two separate CPUs in the same enclosure are going to put out different levels of heat if one is more capable than the other. Being more capable means more heat. More heat in the same approximate amount of space with the same type of cooling (All laptops have nearly the exact same coolers on them, which consists of a single length of copper slug that runs to a small fin array near where a small fan (That is nearly identical for the majority of laptops out there, with few differences even on higher end models) brings airflow over the fin assembly and out the side or back of the unit.

More capable, with more heat, and basically the same or very similar cooling, results in one of them being able to run all out for a long period of time because it does not reach throttle temp, and one of them reaching throttle temps consistently because it was not designed to be used for sustained loads like that, which is what games typically cause.

If you believe this is not the problem, and that there is a fault with the cooling or CPU on your unit, then return it for warranty repair, because it has to still be under warranty I would think unless you bought a model with only a one year warranty, and it wasn't within the last twelve months.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'd have to see a reputable review showing incontrovertible evidence of reduced CORE TEMPS, through normalized testing, before I'd believe that does anything at all. And I don't see any reviews that say that from any reputable review sites.
 
Reputable or not, when I used external fan similar to that in that example, on a Lenovo laptop (they are pretty hot) it helped overall temps quite a bit, much better than pads that do next to nothing. Every little helps as laptops are poorly ventilated.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I would agree with that 100% AND I have NOT used or tried one of those coolers, which are kind of expensive TBH, so I can't really say with any certainty myself that they DON'T help, but before I spent that kind of money on a cooler I think I'd want to know for certain that the results were going to be pretty significant, as that's the sort of money I'd spend on a very good mid range CPU air cooler for a desktop unit.

And, no chance at all that you could use that with the unit unplugged and not drain the battery in a very short amount of time. It would HAVE to be used when plugged in and charging.
 

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