Question my CPU speed is higher than normal

Mar 22, 2020
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my question is , my CPU is an Intel Core i7-4810MQ 2.8 GHz but when i open task manager i found it over 3.4 GHz , is that normal????? , and how can i decrease it ???
 
Last edited:

MadsModsat

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Oct 10, 2019
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2.8 GHz is the base frequency. Your CPU will, when extra performance is required, boost up to 3.8GHz.

Changing frequency up and down according to load on the CPU, is helping reduce thermals among other things

What you are experiencing is normal behaviour.
 
Mar 22, 2020
7
0
10
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2.8 GHz is the base frequency. Your CPU will, when extra performance is required, boost up to 3.8GHz.

Changing frequency up and down according to load on the CPU, is helping reduce thermals among other things

What you are experiencing is normal behaviour.
but my CPU load is 5 % and CPU speed is 3650 please explane to me
 

MadsModsat

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Oct 10, 2019
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I do realize I didn't explain it very well, I apologize. The feature is called Intel Turbo Boost, and most current CPUs have the ability to boost its clock frequency in one way or another.

It doesn't have to be how heavy the load is which makes the CPU boost. Any system process that require resources from the CPU, will make the CPU boost its clock frequency. I isn't neccesarily all cores which will boost at the same time. The higher the frequency of the CPU, the more efficiently the process will be executed.

And contrary to what I accidently made it sound like in my first post, if all cores are under full load, the CPU will noot bost to its maximum frequency (maximum single core boost is normally higher than the maximum all core boost). And if the CPU gets too hot under full load, it will actually thermal throttle and lower the frequency to keep temperatures in check (which is an old safety feature, I know). This is something you'd see more often on a laptop than a desktop PC (in a perfect world at least).

But no matter if the load is 5% or 100%, in theory you would want that process to be handled as quickly and as efficiently as possible, which is why even light load will sometimes boost as high as it can.

It is all about optimizing performance. In theory you get the best performance from your CPU, but with reduced overall powerdraw and better thermal capabilities

EDIT: That was another poor explanation - someone on this forum will be better at explaining it than I am
 
Last edited:
Mar 22, 2020
7
0
10
0
I do realize I didn't explain it very well, I apologize. The feature is called Intel Turbo Boost, and most current CPUs have the ability to boost its clock frequency in one way or another.

It doesn't have to be how heavy the load is which makes the CPU boost. Any system process that require resources from the CPU, will make the CPU boost its clock frequency. I isn't neccesarily all cores which will boost at the same time. The higher the frequency of the CPU, the more efficiently the process will be executed.

And contrary to what I accidently made it sound like in my first post, if all cores are under full load, the CPU will noot bost to its maximum frequency (maximum single core boost is normally higher than the maximum all core boost). And if the CPU gets too hot under full load, it will actually thermal throttle and lower the frequency to keep temperatures in check (which is an old safety feature, I know). This is something you'd see more often on a laptop than a desktop PC (in a perfect world at least).

But no matter if the load is 5% or 100%, in theory you would want that process to be handled as quickly and as efficiently as possible, which is why even light load will sometimes boost as high as it can.

It is all about optimizing performance. In theory you get the best performance from your CPU, but with reduced overall powerdraw and better thermal capabilities

EDIT: That was another poor explanation - someone on this forum will be better at explaining it than I am
thank you so much
 

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