[SOLVED] Need an expert OC'er to help me OC

shen.matt92

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I've an ASRock Z370 PRO 4 and i7-8700K. f I send screenshots of all the BIOS settings, could someone who's an expert just tell me what to change? I've tried OC once and I failed. I don't want to keep trying and potentially damage my CPU and MB.<Redacted> I understand there's a silicon lottery and not all CPU's can do a 1:1 OC ratio or reach 5GHz, but whatever the best that can be done is.


i7-8700K
G Skill 3000MHz RAM
EVGA liquid cooler
IC Diamond TC
EVGA 850W PSU
GTX 1080 TI
 
Dont pay anyone to help you OC your CPU. You can do it yourself. It is really not very hard. It is even harder to damage your CPU as they have many built in safety features. You just dont want too much heat or voltage. For me, I would not put more than 1.4 volts on that chip. As for heat, if it overheats, it will throttle to prevent damage. With the cooler you have on it, you are going to have to go over 1.4 volts to push that chip to 100C.

Here is a good video that will teach you how to OC. It is really easy. Watch it and go through your bios and learn how to do it yourself.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qcta3RStYSM&ab_channel=JayzTwoCents
 

shen.matt92

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Aug 4, 2018
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The thing is all UEFI are different. For instance on the ASRock board there's no adaptive voltage feature but there is on ASUS. I watched an OC video for an ASUS board and tried it myself and had problems. Basically I put the first two cores on 47 then the rest on 46. The CPU cache ratio I left at auto. In CPU-Z I noticed only when the UEFI was in AUTO vcore voltage mode the 4600MHz number would stay for a few seconds, then go down to like 8-1300. I understand this is because I'm doing nothing. But when I turn it to fixed mode @ 1.3v for some reason it never displays 4600 in CPU-Z, only low frequencies. I tried 5GHz on I think 1.3v and my PC wouldn't boot to desktop.
 

shen.matt92

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I posted those responses before opening this video my UEFI looks exactly like that because its also ASRock. But still he's using a different processor
 


Leave the CPU cache ratio alone. For all practical purposes, there are only a couple of settings you should change.

1st, start by restoring your bios to factory default settings. Then change your CPU frequency or it may be called CPU multiplier to 47. This will give you a 4.7ghz OC. It is a good start for a beginner. Dont set the frequency different for each core. Leave it the same.

Then go to your v-core and change it to 1.3 and press enter. This will give it 1.3 volts. For me, I dont go above 1.35 volts. Your chip may take less or more. But it is a start. You can start with 1.25. But my 8700k, 1.3 is the magic number.

Boot your system. If you get a blue screen, up the voltage to the v-core to 1.31. When your system boots, download Intel XTU and Cinebench R15. Run the CPU benchmark in Cinbench in windowed mode and watch your temps in XTU while you run the bench. I like for my average load temps to be below 80C for a daily driver. Run Cinebench and see if your temps average above 80C. If they do, you will need to drop your voltage. If you drop your voltage, your chip may need to drop the frequency. That is the silicon lottery.

If you run the bench and your system crashes, its okay. Dont panic. Just boot back into bios and up your voltage to 1.31. If your system finishes the bench and your temps are below 80C, then boot back into bios and change your frequency multiplier to 48. Boot back into the system and do the whole process over again. Stop when your voltage gets to 1.35 or your average temps go above 80C.

As for RAM, XMP is a one click option for overclocking RAM. It is the way to go, just enable XMP and your RAM is overclocked.
 


The processor does not matter. Essentially, it is all the same. It is like changing a tire. If you can change a tire on a Camry, you can change a tire on a Mercedes.

 
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