[SOLVED] Need help replacing PSU in an Acer Nitro N50-600 Prebuilt PC.

Jul 22, 2020
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I have an Acer Nitro N50-600 prebuilt Desktop PC that I got about 8 months ago. It came with a GTX 1050ti GPU which just wasn't enough for the Sims I run. I replaced it with an RTX 2070 (the exact model in my signature). I have recently been getting strange GPU usage percentages as well as lagging and frame rate drops in a High Demand Flight Simulator. I have been monitoring with GPU-Z and am finding that under the Perf Cap Reason, I am seeing VOp and VRel, mostly the VRel (Limited by voltage reliability). I'm thinking that the crappy generic 500 watt PSU that came installed is the problem, specifically that it's not powerful enough for an RTX 2070, although why I haven't had this trouble till now is beyond me? My first question is what is really going on? My second question is what size PSU will fit into my case, as it is a smaller type case?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!!!!
Thanks!
 
This Is the Model.
You have a bit more power with the Liteon than the FSP, 432 watts vs 408 but still not an ideal situation for upgrading the system. There appears to be some wiggle room for the power supply so you should be able to use most any smaller ATX power supply. You'll have to measure carefully how much space there is for upgrading to an RTX 3000 series GPU. Some of them are pretty large. I'm skeptical about one of those series fitting the available space but a simple measurement will tell. Here's a few power supplies that should easily fit- https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/JfBrxr,fq4BD3,97848d/

Before replacing the Liteon I'd do a clean driver installation with the latest Nvidia drivers and verify you have no issues with high CPU / GPU temperatures which could be causing or contributing to the problem you originally described. MSI afterburner is a good tool to check the GPU temps and performance. I use Core Temp for monitoring CPU temps. These are both freeware programs.

The space in the Nitro chassis is very limited and airflow could be problematic when using more powerful components that generate more heat. A power supply upgrade would still be a good thing considering the model you currently have but I cannot be positive it will fix the system instability you're experiencing.
 
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Jul 22, 2020
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If you take a look at this - https://www.userbenchmark.com/System/Acer-Nitro-N50-600/88666

You can see that a 1660 TI is the best GPU that was installed in a Nitro N50-600.

Can you open your case and look at the info sticker on the PSU. Some people said that they had a Fsp300-60ep in that system and this is a 300 watts PSU. Not a 500 watts. Even if the website says 500.
It's the 500 watt model. I know what Userbenchmark.com says but much of their data is old.
 
It's the 500 watt model. I know what Userbenchmark.com says but much of their data is old.
Here's what I found. The 500 watt model is FSP500-70EP. If you can check the label on your power supply and confirm it's this model then the following info is accurate. The +12 volt combined total wattage is limited to 34 amps (408 watts), so, not a 500 watt PSU by any means. Basically you only have 400 watts to work with due to the misleading label on the FSP model and that's assuming it can actually deliver that much, if it's working properly.

Any newer, high quality power supply will be able to deliver full power on +12 volt or very close to it. An RTX 2070 can consume between 200-225 watts peak power so you've greatly increased total system power consumption moving from a 1050 ti to a 2070. Yeah, with a 400 watt power supply you have a problem. It's not a high quality power supply either, which makes a huge difference.

It appears to be an ATX model but they can vary a lot in length and I can only guess yours is on the smaller side to fit that little case. How did you connect power to the RTX 2070? Did you use adapters or did the unit actually have the required power cables?

What you need is a high quality power supply with a small footprint that can deliver a minimum of around 45 amps on +12 volt. Something like this (example)- Phanteks AMP 550. It's based on Seasonic Focus Plus model so if the Phanteks model is not available to you maybe the Seasonic is.
 
Reactions: TJS1986
Jul 22, 2020
45
3
35
0
Here's what I found. The 500 watt model is FSP500-70EP. If you can check the label on your power supply and confirm it's this model then the following info is accurate. The +12 volt combined total wattage is limited to 34 amps (408 watts), so, not a 500 watt PSU by any means. Basically you only have 400 watts to work with due to the misleading label on the FSP model and that's assuming it can actually deliver that much, if it's working properly.

Any newer, high quality power supply will be able to deliver full power on +12 volt or very close to it. An RTX 2070 can consume between 200-225 watts peak power so you've greatly increased total system power consumption moving from a 1050 ti to a 2070. Yeah, with a 400 watt power supply you have a problem. It's not a high quality power supply either, which makes a huge difference.

It appears to be an ATX model but they can vary a lot in length and I can only guess yours is on the smaller side to fit that little case. How did you connect power to the RTX 2070? Did you use adapters or did the unit actually have the required power cables?

What you need is a high quality power supply with a small footprint that can deliver a minimum of around 45 amps on +12 volt. Something like this (example)- Phanteks AMP 550. It's based on Seasonic Focus Plus model so if the Phanteks model is not available to you maybe the Seasonic is.
Thank you so much for your response!!! The PSU is a LITEON 80+ Bronze Model # PS-7501-5. It says 500 watt max output. I measured the PSU to the best of my ability and it is as follows: Width-5.5 in. Length-5.5 in. Height-3.25 in. Another question would be until I get a better PSU, I have an EVGA GTX 1660. Would it be wise to swap that with the 2070 until then? Also, I did not use adapters, the PSU had the required 8 pin and 6 pin.
Thanks again so much!!!

The PSU Model in your link looks good, only I would want the 750 watt variant in case I move to an RTX 30 Series at some point?
 
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This Is the Model.
You have a bit more power with the Liteon than the FSP, 432 watts vs 408 but still not an ideal situation for upgrading the system. There appears to be some wiggle room for the power supply so you should be able to use most any smaller ATX power supply. You'll have to measure carefully how much space there is for upgrading to an RTX 3000 series GPU. Some of them are pretty large. I'm skeptical about one of those series fitting the available space but a simple measurement will tell. Here's a few power supplies that should easily fit- https://pcpartpicker.com/products/compare/JfBrxr,fq4BD3,97848d/

Before replacing the Liteon I'd do a clean driver installation with the latest Nvidia drivers and verify you have no issues with high CPU / GPU temperatures which could be causing or contributing to the problem you originally described. MSI afterburner is a good tool to check the GPU temps and performance. I use Core Temp for monitoring CPU temps. These are both freeware programs.

The space in the Nitro chassis is very limited and airflow could be problematic when using more powerful components that generate more heat. A power supply upgrade would still be a good thing considering the model you currently have but I cannot be positive it will fix the system instability you're experiencing.
 
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