NetGear Launches New ReadyNAS Servers

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shadowfamicom

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They look nice, but for the cost I would just build a cheap PC and fill all the bays with drives (including the 5.25 bays). Boards with 8+ sata ports are not to tricky to find.

Although the "600 developers registered to create additional content" I find interesting.
 

Peet McKinney

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Not that I've been one to defend ReadyNAS lately, but shadowfamicom, you're absolutely right you could build your own NAS box. However, the point of a NAS solution like the ReadyNAS 6, is that it's all done for you and it's all done, really, really well. I built a rocketship of a NAS a while back but found myself wasting too much time tinkering with it. When it comes to the ReadyNAS's I've deployed it's often set and forget.

That said. The NAS that I built myself has no risk of being left behind has the NAS OS matures. Something that Netgear has done to it's current NAS owners.

thillntn, I'm pretty sure that even if Netgear comes to their senses and offers an upgrade path to current owners of ReadyNAS products, they will only offer ReadyNAS OS 6 on x86.
 

milktea

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It appears that Netgear is moving from ext3/4 to BTRFS format drives. But the NAS still doesn't have support for NTFS drives (especially for their 2-bay home model)? I would think that home users would like to be able to plug an NTFS volume into their NAS drives. I woudn't even bother trying it out unless the NAS can mount my collections of 'NTFS' HDDs.
 

Max000

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to "milktea", you probably can do that with a NAS running a Windows. But that would be a bit more expensive.
Also all modern NASes are able to read and write NTSF external disks (a special mention of QNAP which has a better set of performance on this area): therefore it's only a matter of using an external case (USB/eSATA depending of the NAS you are using) to move the data from the external disk to the NAS. You only need one blank disk to begin with, since most of the NASes today offer a way of migrate the 1 disk volume to 2, 3, 4 disks.
 

milktea

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to "Max000"

I had a hard time finding any performance and review on the NAS external interface 'esata'/usb. I think people very rarely uses these external interfaces, if any at all. So most pay very little attention in writing reviews on the external interfaces. IMO, these external interface are pretty much useless.

In reply to your comments, why would I want to attached an external disk to the NAS? Using external disk voids the benefits of RAID. I could just be better off buying an external esata enclosure, instead of having both the NAS + enclosure.

My point is, users are pretty much stuck once the data is moved into the NAS. Since the data is stored in ext3/4/HFS format that windows machine cannot mount/read. The only way that 'Windows' users could retrieve those data is by copying/downloading (or whatever means) those data to a windows format drive/device (whatever media). Which to me is just a haslle, very annoying.

The current NASes are just not made for Windows home users. I don't know why they try to market it to home/soho users.
 
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