[SOLVED] New build around $2000, give or take.

Feb 24, 2019
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Hi,

This will be my first post, I've read the forum guidelines and it is my hope that I don't forgo any rules.
With that said, my current computer is getting very old, I bought and assembled it during the first months of 2011 and I am a bit surprised it is still going strong.
Naturally I have replaced some parts during the years, mainly the graphics card, from a Gigabyte Geforce GTX 460 1024MB OC to my current GTX 750 with one Gig of ram.
I still have my original Core i5 2500K processor.

Originally I had 3 mechanical drives, two in RAID-0 for the system and one for backup, movies and such.
I tossed out the RAID-0 disks and replaced them with a Samsung 860 EVO 500GB SSD and my computer felt like new again.
All built in a Define R3 chassis on a Gigabyte GA-P67A-UD4 REV B3 motherboard with 8GB of 1600Mhz Corsair RAM supplied by a Corsair VX 550W 80+ PSU.

I don't know if that background was needed but I felt like I put it in there anyway :unsure:

Anyhow, now on to the present situation:
I've been doing some research during a couple of weeks, if not months, when it comes to new hardware for a new build, I am not 100% certain of which components to chose, compability, price value and so forth, hence this post.

I am looking for a build that will last a long time, just like my previous computer, certainly I would love to have performance but I rather go with longetivity and therefore I am not interested in overclocking.
It is quite important that my build will be quiet and stable, not dead quiet but still not sounding like a car crash in repeat.
As for watercooling, I did consider it but decided it is not for me, I rather go for regular fans, call me conservative but I like to go with familiar things.
I like to mention that I will not buy all parts at the same time as I cannot afford it, it will take me 3 to 4 months in order to get all the necessary parts.

Case:
I narrowed it down to 2 different cases in the end, all from Fractal Design, Define C and Define C Meshify.
As I understand it, Define C is somewhat better at noise reduction than Meshify, downside is that it will have some problems when it comes to drawing in fresh air to the front fans.
So, I will take a chance on the Define C Meshify

Motherboard:
ASUS TUF Z390 Pro Gaming

Processor:
Intel i9-9900K
Naturally I would love to buy this but I am on a budget, perhaps if the price will go down in a near future.

Intel i7-9700K
Two more cores that the i5 but no hyperthreading, as it's predecessor had.

Intel i5-9600K
Six cores and slightly faster stock clock speeds compared to the i7.
I will mainly use my computer for gaming so an i5 should be the smart choice for me I suppose.
But, from time to time I will be using my computer to render images in Autodesk Maya.
Question is, will I be satisfied with an i5?

Graphics:
Nvidia RTX 2060 Founders Edition
I think this will be a good choice paired with either of the processor mentioned earlier, it is also minimalistic and classy looking.

Memory:
Corsair 16GB (2x8GB) DDR4 3000MHz CL15 Vengeance.
I will add another set of pairs later on so I will end up with 32GB in total.

Hard drives:
2 mechanical drives of 1TB each for backup purposes, movies and the like.
A good idea to run these in RAID-1 for safety purposes?
Samsung 970 EVO Plus 500GB for my operating system and programs, will it work with the mobo? I read that these things will disable a SATA port but that should not be a problem as SATA ports usually come in abundance?
Samsung 960 EVO 500GB SSD for games.

Power supply:
Corsair RM750X 750W v2

Cooling:
So much to chose from, make my nose bleed...
I finally ended up with a Dark Rock 4 for my CPU, only concern I have is if it will cover the memory slots on the motherboard. As for it's height I think it will fit with the Define C Meshify case.
For the case itself I picked 4 Be quiet! ShadowWings 120mm PWM, 3 in front and 1 in the back.
Is this overkill? My thinking is it's better to run 4 of these fans at lower speed than 2 of them at higher speed when it comes to noise produced, maybe not correct thinking?
Is it possible (via BIOS or otherwise) to make the case fans adapt their speeds after the CPU fan?
Is it better to let them all use the PWM and alternate individually?

Sorry for a long post, looking forward to your answers.
Cheers from Sweden.
 

korv

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Dec 26, 2018
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I5 9600k and 2060 should be a good combo. Your m.2 will disable some sata port but you're still able to connect your hdds. Your powersupply is a bit overkill for i5 9600k and 2060 but it'll be future proof if you want to upgrade your components.


Your fans will bring a lot of fresh air to your system. 3 fans as intake and one as exhaust at the back. Not sure if it's possible but i don't think you should make your fan speed same as your cpu fans.
 

korv

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Dec 26, 2018
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I5 9600k and 2060 should be a good combo. Your m.2 will disable some sata port but you're still able to connect your hdds. Your powersupply is a bit overkill for i5 9600k and 2060 but it'll be future proof if you want to upgrade your components.


Your fans will bring a lot of fresh air to your system. 3 fans as intake and one as exhaust at the back. Not sure if it's possible but i don't think you should make your fan speed same as your cpu fans.
 

assasin32

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Apr 23, 2008
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I wouldn't buy now than, prices change fairly quickly and a new set of Ryzens will be here by than or very close. So I would wait till all the funds are gathered than buy.

For long term I would consider either socket a dead end with how long you use your build. AM4 will be supported till 2020 to my knowledge, no idea on Intel but they seem to change sockets all the time it feels like. So socket type for future upgrades seems like a moot point to consider.

For how long you use your builds I would shy away from water cooling too. Air is low maintenance and no worries of a rogue leaking taking out the hardware, and truthfully I wouldn't trust any prebuilt water cooler for this long of a haul but that is just personal opinion.

For m2 SSD disabling sata ports just think of it as a port being connected but without any physical wire for simplicity's sake. It's easy to find boards with at least 6 sata ports if your worried and you can buy cards to add more if you wanted to.

For RAID 1 that's up to you, personally I have several hard drives and just a single 2tb HDD as a backup drive. I use Windows file history and I just tell it to backup stuff I care about as quite a bit of my data is replaceable but others are not.
 
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korv

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Dec 26, 2018
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I wouldn't buy now than, prices change fairly quickly and a new set of Ryzens will be here by than or very close. So I would wait till all the funds are gathered than buy.

For long term I would consider either socket a dead end with how long you use your build. AM4 will be supported till 2020 to my knowledge, no idea on Intel but they seem to change sockets all the time it feels like. So socket type for future upgrades seems like a moot point to consider.

For how long you use your builds I would shy away from water cooling too. Air is low maintenance and no worries of a rogue leaking taking out the hardware, and truthfully I wouldn't trust any prebuilt water cooler for this long of a haul but that is just personal opinion.

For m2 SSD disabling sata ports just think of it as a port being connected but without any physical wire for simplicity's sake. It's easy to find boards with at least 6 sata ports if your worried and you can buy cards to add more if you wanted to.

Well, it's still expensive in sweden even tho prices changes. I5 8600k cost like 260 dollors while it cost 3000 sek in sweden (300 dollors).
 
Feb 24, 2019
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Your powersupply is a bit overkill for i5 9600k and 2060 but it'll be future proof if you want to upgrade your components.
Not sure if it's possible but i don't think you should make your fan speed same as your cpu fans.
That's my thinking, futureproof.
Also, I might be wrong on this but it is my understanding that it is better to have some watts to spare rather than have a PSU that is constantly straining with it's wattage cap.
My reasoning on this may be flawed.
As for the fans, if the cpu is maxed out at 2500rpm then the case fans should max out at their top speeds, for example 1500rpm.
If the cpu fan is running at, say, 1500rpm then the case fans would run at 800rpm, I hope that illustration made sense.

For long term I would consider either socket a dead end with how long you use your build. AM4 will be supported till 2020 to my knowledge, no idea on Intel but they seem to change sockets all the time it feels like. So socket type for future upgrades seems like a moot point to consider.
One could be waiting forever for new technologies to arrive, I think I go for the current and then hopefully it will be sufficient for me for the couple of coming years.
It worked pretty well with my build I described in the beginning of my post.
 

korv

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Dec 26, 2018
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That's my thinking, futureproof.
Also, I might be wrong on this but it is my understanding that it is better to have some watts to spare rather than have a PSU that is constantly straining with it's wattage cap.
My reasoning on this may be flawed.
As for the fans, if the cpu is maxed out at 2500rpm then the case fans should max out at their top speeds, for example 1500rpm.
If the cpu fan is running at, say, 1500rpm then the case fans would run at 800rpm, I hope that illustration made sense.


One could be waiting forever for new technologies to arrive, I think I go for the current and then hopefully it will be sufficient for me for the couple of coming years.
It worked pretty well with my build I described in the beginning of my post.

As lon as yor intake fans are bringing enough air for your system you should be fine.
 

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