Question New Gaming PC lagging on Games

Aug 23, 2019
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So I recently got a new Gaming PC to one-up my previous PC because it couldn't play certain heavy duty games like Sniper Elite 4 and such. finished updating all of the drivers and such but when I load up a game it lags intensively. the computer normally runs perfectly fine, can run multiple videos and play pokemon-showdown at the same time without a moment of lag anywhere, but when I load up a steam game, it lags to the point of where even a card game is unplayable.

CC: Elgato HD60
CPU: AMD Ryzen 7 3800X 3.9GHz [4.5GHz Turbo] 8 Cores/ 16 Threads 36MB Cache 105W Processor
RAM: 8GB (8GBx1) DDR4/3000MHz Memory (ADATA XPG Z1)
MB: ASRock X570 Phantom Gaming 4 ATX w/ WiFi, RGB, Intel LAN, 2 PCIe x16, 2 PCIe x1, 8 SATA3, 2 M.2 SATA/PCIe
VC: EVGA GeForce® GTX 1660 XC Black Gaming 6GB GDDR5
PS: 800 Watts


I took the two hard-drives out of the old PC and are using them for this PC, so to keep all those Files, I ran the PC once with a fresh Drive before switching it over to current Drives.

plz help it's killing me knowing my computer I spent so much money on is working even less than my previous computer ;-;
 

britechguy

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Jul 2, 2019
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I'll second the last poster in all respects. 8GB of memory is abysmally little for your intended purpose.

You also need to do a fresh install of Windows 10 when you have fresh hardware, period.
 
Aug 23, 2019
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alright, how would I go about doing a fresh install of Windows 10 while maintaining all the files? and can I use my ram sticks from my previous PC and add it to this one?

I know they're both DDR4 but they are different manufacturers

8GB (4GBx2) DDR4/2400MHz Dual Channel Memory
 

britechguy

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Jul 2, 2019
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You can't do a fresh install of Windows 10 and maintain all the files. We're not talking about doing a feature update on the same hardware.

You have taken a system drive out of a completely alien hardware configuration, tucked it in to a completely new environment, and expect Windows 10 to run that way without issue, when it has all the device drivers it loaded associated with the hardware landscape that was present when it was installed? That just doesn't work, regardless of the operating system.

You need to back up your user data, get an inventory of your installed programs using something like Belarc Advisor, and collect the installers for anything you're going to need to reinstall.

Then you do a clean Windows 10 install, reinstall the programs that need to be reinstalled, then copy your user data back.

There is no such thing as a "heart transplant" for an operating system from one hardware landscape to another. When they are installing they interrogate what they're installing on and set themselves up accordingly.

You will most likely need to obtain a new Windows 10 license as well, as you've changed machines, unless the license you had is a Retail license that allows you to transfer it to any single machine you wish.
 
Reactions: WildCard999
Aug 23, 2019
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alright, so when I got this new PC I got it with a 1 TB Drive, would it be possible to simply use that drive? since I did boot up the PC once before with that drive

I guess what I'm asking is whether or not there's a way to use this third drive as the primary drive so to keep the files on the other two, or would the OS on the current drive cause troubles with the new Drive? sorry don't know a whole lot about this stuff
 

WildCard999

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Herald
Not only is the clean install required but you'll want to update the motherboard & GPU drivers as well. Backup important files, stuff such as games can usually be redownloaded via Steam, Uplay, Origin, etc. Saves are usually in a cloud type service unless disabled (pretty sure enabled is default). If your games are modded such as skyrim take a Snip of the mods & the load order.
 

britechguy

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Jul 2, 2019
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If your machine came with Windows 10 installed on that 1 TB drive, and you have two drive bays for the other two, you can definitely keep the drive that came with your system as your primary system drive and use the other two as secondary drives. If that 1TB drive was already preinstalled with Windows 10 from the OEM, all of the correct drivers, etc., are already present on it for your hardware.

Many people do this, then delete all the Windows folders off of whichever one of the secondary drives had been a primary drive in the box from which it was pulled. Those folders are dead weight on a non-system drive that will never again be the system drive.
 
Reactions: WildCard999
Aug 23, 2019
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alright so I can simply add on that 1 TB in the primary slot, and then keep my other two, and just delete the Windows folders from current one, would there be any issues? like are the drives going to conflict with one another in any way?
 

britechguy

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Jul 2, 2019
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No and no.

Windows does not care one whit about how many drives you add in addition to the system drive. By convention, the actual system drive is virtually always given the drive letter of C: and any that are plugged in afterward will be assigned the next drive letter that was not yet assigned (and if they're permanent drives, they'll retain those drive letters). They're all treated as "just another storage drive" regardless of what is actually on them, because that's exactly what they are. They will never be referred to for booting (under typical configurations - I'm not going to discuss exotic arrangements people can create - they're not relevant here).
 

britechguy

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1. Take out what is currently the system drive.

2. Replace it with the 1TB drive, using the same connections to the motherboard, so that it will be recognized as the system drive instead.

3. Either:
a) Place the drive just removed former system drive away somewhere for future use.
b) Install the drive just removed in to an auxiliary bay, use new cables to connect it to the motherboard in the next available drive cable position, and use it as an auxiliary drive.
 
Aug 23, 2019
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alright, do I need to do anything special before doing this? or can I just shut-down my PC and switch it all out real quick? again I'm really sorry for the million questions I am not very smart when it comes to this stuff
 

britechguy

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Jul 2, 2019
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You can just shut down your PC AND disconnect the external power source and swap the drives out.

Ideally you'd have a static band in use while doing this, but even I know that "ideally" seldom happens and I've swapped many a hard drive without one.
 

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