Question New PC won't give any display signal, even though it's running fine

Jul 14, 2019
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So I recently built a new PC (specs below) and when i've tried to boot it up it won't give any display signals to the monitor. When I start it up everything seems to run fine (fans are running and lights are on). I've tried using different kinds of cables (DP and DVI), different monitors, made sure the monitor was set to the current display type, and even tried using the motherboard display, but to no avail. I've made sure every single cable is connected within the PC and even made sure my CPU cooler was on correctly, but nothing seems to be working. At this point I think there must just be some faulty part.

Specs:
Motherboard: B250M-HDV
CPU: Intel i7-7700K
GPU: GEFORCE RTX 2060
PSU: CX550M 550W
RAM: G.SKILL Aegis 16GB (2x8GB)
Storage: Samsung 860 EVO Micro SSD
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
You connected to the power cable from the PSU to the graphics card?

Have you tried removing and reinstalling the graphics card?

Have you tried resetting the CMOS with everything installed, as follows:

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

Have you pulled the memory and try reinstalling it to make sure it's fully seated?
 
Jul 14, 2019
5
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10
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You connected to the power cable from the PSU to the graphics card?

Have you tried removing and reinstalling the graphics card?

Have you tried resetting the CMOS with everything installed, as follows:

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

Have you pulled the memory and try reinstalling it to make sure it's fully seated?
Yes I've done the first two things but I haven't tried resetting the CMOS. Will do and give an update.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
So now, take the CPU back out and check to see if (likely, yes, yes there is) there are any bent pins on the motherboard CPU socket. This is probably a case of bent pins due to not installing the CPU correctly.
 
Jul 14, 2019
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So now, take the CPU back out and check to see if (likely, yes, yes there is) there are any bent pins on the motherboard CPU socket. This is probably a case of bent pins due to not installing the CPU correctly.
I've looked a million times and even zoomed in on photographs I've taken of the CPU socket and I absolutely cannot find any bent pins. You can have a look at it if you want, maybe I'm just missing it.
View: https://imgur.com/a/zpNfA2w
 
Jul 14, 2019
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I agree. I don't see anything that looks unusual.

You've tried the onboard CPU graphics with the graphics card COMPLETELY removed from the machine?

Did you buy all these parts new, or were some of them used?
Yes, I've tried to get signal from the motherboard without the gpu in the PC. And yes, again, half of the parts are brand new from amazon and the others from newegg. Honestly at this point I may just bring it to a shop to see if there's some sort of faulty part.
 

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