Question Not sure if I should "upgrade" my older PC to Win10

Compguy2021

Prominent
Nov 24, 2021
6
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510
So, I have an older PC, still running Win7. I have no complaints/issues with this PC. ( at least nothing to do with the OS). It is my regular daily use computer. Its does everything I need it to. Its reasonably fast, in the tasks I require it to do. The only real "want" I have would be some more RAM, but both the motherboard and Win7 are maxed out at 16GB.

I am perfectly happy with the performance of my computer right now, as-is. I don't play games at all, and never will ( at least not on the PC). I am a heavy internet user ( 100+ Chrome tabs open at any given time). I also run a stock trading programming some times. It is old code, and as per the company, is a 100% single threaded program. During typical daily use, I can use all 16GB of RAM if I let the amount of Chrome windows/tabs get out of hand. However, as per Windows performance monitor, I rarely place even a moderate load on the CPU. Typically less then 10% cpu load, and most of that is only on 1 core. Occasionally the other cores will see a brief blip of activity, but not much. The ONLY reason I am even thinking about switching to Win10 is because of the increasing pressure from ridiculous "forced" compliance from various software providers. In other words " big tech" making decisions for me.

I can not afford to buy new hardware right now. Its not an option, so please don't suggest I do. That's not what this thread is about. I will update the OS IF I can do so without a performance penalty. I will NOT install Win10 if its going to slow down my pc, nor will I accept stability / bug issues. So, the question is, how will Win10 affect the performance of THIS PC, in comparison to my current fully functional Win7 installation? Will my current hardware run Win10 well ( as good as, or better then, Win7)? Also, HP recently deleted all support info, driver downloads, etc.. for this PC. Will that be an issue for a Win10 install?

The system specs are as follows:
PC is based on a pre-built HP Pavillion P6654y , but with numerous upgrades
AMD Phenom II X6 1055T 2.8Ghz ( 6 core/ 6 thread)
ASUS GTX660 GPU
16GB DDR3 Patriot Viper RAM ( 4GB x 4) - I would like more, especially w/ Win10 - but this is the max for the cheesy N-Alvorix motherboard.
500GB WD Blue SSD ( drive is faster then what motherboard supports - but still this probably made the biggest improvement in speed/performance)
10/100/1000 ( 1Gbps) Broadcom NIC ( stock on-board is only 10/100) and a dual A/C wi-fi card.
 

Colif

Win 11 Master
Moderator
if it runs fine now, I would stay on win 7.

Do you have backups as if HP removed all drivers, getting them all again in an emergency would be a pain. Even if you stay on 7.

the lack of drivers wouldn't be too much of a problem as I can bet there probably aren't many that windows wouldn't have, for a PC released in 2011. It might be if you clean installed but if you updated from 7 to 10, it would use the old drivers installed now.

But I can't guarantee you wouldn't have other problems on 10. Hence my suggestion to just use what works now.
 

Compguy2021

Prominent
Nov 24, 2021
6
0
510
if it runs fine now, I would stay on win 7.

Do you have backups as if HP removed all drivers, getting them all again in an emergency would be a pain. Even if you stay on 7.

the lack of drivers wouldn't be too much of a problem as I can bet there probably aren't many that windows wouldn't have, for a PC released in 2011. It might be if you clean installed but if you updated from 7 to 10, it would use the old drivers installed now.

But I can't guarantee you wouldn't have other problems on 10. Hence my suggestion to just use what works now.
I have the OEM recovery partition, on both the current SSD, and on the old HD ( which I just unplugged and left in the case) I think I even have the factory "recovery" CD's somewhere. I could also just save a copy of the current "win32\drivers\" folder before doing anything, as well as a full system backup/ image. In other words, I should have no problem getting back to exactly where I'm at today, if I had too.

The reason I'm considering updating is because more things are going to be artificially "cut off" as time goes on. For example, I'm concerned that I will lose access to many banking / financial sites once Chrome ( and Edge ) no longer update.

How will Win10 run on this hardware? Better then Win7, worse? the same?
 
I have the OEM recovery partition, on both the current SSD, and on the old HD ( which I just unplugged and left in the case) I think I even have the factory "recovery" CD's somewhere. I could also just save a copy of the current "win32\drivers\" folder before doing anything, as well as a full system backup/ image. In other words, I should have no problem getting back to exactly where I'm at today, if I had too.

The reason I'm considering updating is because more things are going to be artificially "cut off" as time goes on. For example, I'm concerned that I will lose access to many banking / financial sites once Chrome ( and Edge ) no longer update.

How will Win10 run on this hardware? Better then Win7, worse? the same?
I suspect the only way your going to know is to try it.

Just make sure you have a way to go back.
 

punkncat

Champion
Ambassador
It is said that W10 uses less system resources than W7. I had the habit of tuning and turning off things I didn't need or use in both of those, so I have no real idea or recollection of how much memory was being used with 7. On 10 I get idle desktop use in the area of 2-3GB.
It would afford you the ability to use other modern programs without hassle, at least for a couple of years till EOL.

IMO, take out your current OS drive. Pop another in (unplug others if equipped) and install W10 on the machine for a test drive. I would choose the unregistered path up till you know if you like it or will stay on it.