Nvidia Announces Quadro K6000 Workstation GPU

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Giovanni-L

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For clients this size (Pixar and Nissan), the price must be coherent so they too find it "relatively expensive". These guys must have rigs armed with triple SLIs of these beasts of a card...

Preeeeety far away from any mere mortal and us "herculean small heroes" of gaming.

*Herculean small heroes? Yes. We are the toughest around in the playground, but the big guys are in the principal's office.
 

nord_musician

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^ They don't use SLI. Yes, they do have a couple of cards installed but they dont have to do SLI, specially if they use OPENCL, CUDA. Heck does even Quadro supports SLI? :p
 

giovanni86

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I believe the cards have a form of sli, if u go check out the tesla cards and quadro's you can notice they do have a SLI connector on them. But since i don't own or have had any workstation card in a desktop i wouldn't know for sure. I can only imagine if this was a GPU for gaming, 12GB's! I still remember when 256MB's or even 64MB's was a big deal.
 

kinggremlin

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Quadro's are SLI capable, but the workstation they are used in has to be certified for it for NVidia to guarantee proper operation.

A TDP of 225W is mighty impressive when you consider that the Titan is rated at 250W.
 

Blazer1985

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Three way "sli" of 580-680-titans are quite common in average 3D studios. These are as always the best professional certified cards out there but cost way too much for what they offer (even with double precision performance cropped on the GTXs)
However Gpgpu often perform better when not connected through sli cable :)
 


Well pro cards like quadro often clocked much lower than their geforce counterpart for stability so it's not really suprising if quadro cards like K6000 consume much less.

So the yeild finally good enough for nvidia to start selling product based on fullly enabled GK110.
 

dragonsqrrl

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You're essentially paying for the drivers, and the additional optimization and validation for a wide range of professional applications. Unless the "3D studios" you're referring to run games, I can't imagine why they would be running any sort of SLI setup in their workstations. None of the content creation or video editing software I'm familiar with can take advantage of SLI for viewport or output rendering acceleration.

And I don't think SLI plays much of a role in multi-GPU compute performance. I always thought SLI was meant specifically for rendering, pretty much exclusively in games. But Tesla cards also include SLI bridge support, so I'm not sure. As far as I know you don't need to be running two GPU's in SLI to achieve parallel scaling from the second GPU.
 

dragonsqrrl

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The thing is the stock clock on the K6000 is estimated to be higher than any other GK110 based card, including the GTX780. In addition it uses a fully enabled 15 SMX GK110. It would be interesting to compare real world load power consumption between the Titan and K6000. If I had to guess the official TDP isn't telling the whole story on power consumption. One theory might be that the higher TDP on the Geforce cards allows for higher and more consistent boost-clocks and greater overclocking headroom, where as Quadro cards don't have a boost clock. It isn't unusual for a Titan to run consistently at or above 900MHz at load, despite the top boost clock of 876MHz in the specs.

In any case this card is going to be an absolute beast. 5.2 TFLOPS SP is very impressive, but 1.7 TFLOPS DP is just insane. It's been a long time since Nvidia launched a Quadro card with raw clocks and specs similar to its Geforce counterparts. They must be really confident in these top binned GK110's.
 
Gentlemen?,

NVIDIA will sell far more of these - my wild guess is $4,650- than we mere mortals might expect, as the visual aids for the advancing realm of the Personal Supercomputer.

The recent increase in availability of of 4X and 8X CPU, 8 and 10 core CPU's (10-core Xeons are $3,500+) supporting up to 4TB of ECC RAM - that's a $35,000 story in itself- plus the important advances offered by PCIe coprocessing modules such as Tesla K20 and Intel Xeon Phi will bring> atmospheric, oceanic, astrohysical, chemical, metallurgical, and particle modeling, CGI feature film animation/ editing, gas, dynamic structural, thermal, mechanical, financial, resources exploration, and aerodynamic simulation to a new level of accessibility- well relatively.

The Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge, currently the most powerful calculating machine in the World, is using massively parallel components of which the bulk of the fundamental components > AMD CPU's and the Tesla K20X coprocessors are a $97,000,000 configuration of multiples (18,600+ of each) of components found at newegg and amazon. That's the key to all this- string together many, semi-consumer level parts into a massive system > it's AI Modular Man! And the Quadro K6000 as an extreme performer will be one of the big picture windows to those events.

BambiBoom >

Quadro's > FX 4800, FX 580, FX 570, FX 550 (retired) > Aspirational > K4000

PS > And yes, the K6000 is guaranteed to be SLI- capable as are the Quadro 6000 and K5000 along with the Quadro FX 4800 (1.5 GB) and FX 5800 (4GB) of two generations ago.



 

cozmium

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Honestly Nissan North America.... If you're having to convert nurbs to polygons to be able to use something, you've been wasting a hell of a lot of time and could save countless man-hours if whatever machine needs it in triangles was adapted to work with nurbs and change it on-the-fly for whatever reason.

There is NO sense in changing from nurbs purely to do rendering though, if that's what you've been doing (perhaps between formats) - especially when DeltaGen uses nurbs anyway.
 

duttyfoot

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sli will only work on games from what i know, DCC apps do not support sli.
 

dragonsqrrl

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Ya, that's not SLI.

In a Maximus configuration the Tesla handles parallel processing, freeing up the Quadro to devote all of its resources towards rendering. It works differently, and serves a completely different purpose.
 

tomfreak

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This is what a GTX780 should have been if AMD 7970 is a lot faster. I honestly dont get why AMD trying to put a heavy compute card into a gaming card. Radeon 7970 should have been base on 7870 chip with extra 50% in everything.
 

mapesdhs

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The memory bus is not wide enough. Just like Titan and the 780, it won't be able
to feed all those cores fast enough for the real CUDA potential to be fully exploited.
I just don't get why NVIDIA keeps using such narrow bus widths/speeds. Check
the CUDA page for the 760 review, the very high bandwidth per core is why the 580
is still so good for CUDA, despite having massively fewer cores. This thing really
needs a 768bit bus.

I don't know why so many keep asking about SLI. Of course the card supports
SLI, upper-end Quadros always have, but only certified mbds/chipsets allow this
to function, and even then OEM driver configurations can further limit what will
work, eg. I have a Dell T7500 and a couple of Quadro FX 5500s which should
run SLI, but they can't because Dell never supported it even though NVIDIA says
it should be ok (NVIDIA told me they had no idea FX 5500 SLI didn't work in a
T7500). In reality though, not many pro apps are written to properly exploit SLI.

Ian.

 

mapesdhs

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JPNpower writes:
> I'd assume that the wider bus is massively expensive...

Not at all, it's been done before; the 280 had a 512bit bus, and NVIDIA already has the
expertise to do 1024bit bus tech.


> ... Are you saying that a 580 (570??) is competitive with a modern 760 in CUDA?

YES! Read the 760 review, it matches or beats a 780 much of the time. And two 580s
leave a Titan in the dust. See:

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/geforce-gtx-760-review-gk104,3542-19.html

NB: Fluidmark produces a composite score; only part of the test is CUDA, the rest is
normal 3D stuff which of course is much quicker with newer cards.


See this AE benchmark thread for example CUDA results from a wide variety of
GPU configs:

http://forums.creativecow.net/thread/2/1019120

My tri-580 run is currently the fastest submitted result.

Ian.

 

JPNpower

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So completely off topic, 570 x2 is better than 760 for adobe stuff?

Strangely local microcenter still has those things in stock. I'd want to go 580s but don't think it is worth the hassle of used products.
 
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