Nvidia Presents Adaptive Temporal Anti-Aliasing Technology

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jimmysmitty

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https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/directx/2018/03/19/announcing-microsoft-directx-raytracing/

"What Hardware Will DXR Run On?

Developers can use currently in-market hardware to get started on DirectX Raytracing. There is also a fallback layer which will allow developers to start experimenting with DirectX Raytracing that does not require any specific hardware support. For hardware roadmap support for DirectX Raytracing, please contact hardware vendors directly for further details."

Per Microsoft it should be viable on current in-market hardware such as Pascal or Vega GPUs.
 

Verrin

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I don't know, all these new forms of AA still seem to suffer from the blurring effect. MSAA and SSAA seem to be dead technique in modern titles, despite their superior quality. I understand that they're too expensive for most configurations, but I would still like the option, in the off-chance I have some kind of headroom for it (now or perhaps with future hardware).

Ultimately these days, I always opt to turn off any kind of AA altogether and just go for a resolution bump to help smooth out the jaggies. And if I was forced to play at lower resolutions, I would still pick the horror of no-AA over the vaseline of TAA and FXAA. That's how much I dislike the effect. ATAA doesn't seem much better judging from this demonstration.
 

Dosflores

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Where does Microsoft say that it should be viable on Pascal or Vega? Microsoft says you can use currently in-market hardware, which could mean the Titan V alone.
 

shpankey

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So AA techniques add input lag?? I guess I didn't know that. More reason to never ever us it ever again no matter what.
 

jimmysmitty

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Titan V is not a consumer grade gaming card. DXR is mainly a gaming technology. Therefore it is easy to assume that "currently in-market hardware" means current gaming hardware, Pascal and Vega.

As well Volta only has one feature above Pascal in DX12_1 which is tier 3 Conservative Rasterization while Pascal is Tier 2. That should have NOTHING to do with Ray Tracing as Ray Tracing and Rasterization are two methods of processing models.

https://www.pcper.com/news/Graphics-Cards/NVIDIA-RTX-Technology-Accelerates-Ray-Tracing-Microsoft-DirectX-Raytracing-API

"DXR will still run on other GPUS from NVIDIA that aren’t utilizing the Volta architecture. Microsoft says that any board that can support DX12 Compute will be able to run the new API. But NVIDIA did point out that in its mind, even with a high-end SKU like the GTX 1080 Ti, the ray tracing performance will limit the ability to integrate ray tracing features and enhancements in real-time game engines in the immediate timeframe. It’s not to say it is impossible, or that some engine devs might spend the time to build something unique, but it is interesting to hear NVIDIA infer that only future products will benefit from ray tracing in games."

Microsoft states any cards that support DX12 Compute will run DXR. nVidia only states that the Titan V will be the best performing GPU that is currently out (until of course the 11 series is announced) but that anything else will still be capable of running it.

Is that a good enough quote?
 

Dosflores

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Not really.

Microsoft talks about "specific hardware support" and about "hardware roadmap support", which makes it easy to assume that current gaming hardware isn't viable for it. There's a great difference between "able to run the new API" and being viable. Intel integrated GPUs are also able to run the DX12 API, but I wouldn't call them viable for gaming.
 

jimmysmitty

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I was just correcting an error in the article. The article stated that there was no support for DXR in current hardware. That is false. Microsoft claims that DXR will be supported by any GPU that supports DX12 Compute (i.e. Pascal, Vega, GCN 5, Maxwell etc)

As for Ray Tracing, it has been supported for quite a while, older than Vega and Pascal. The issue is that its a very resource intensive method which is why no games actually utilize it fully, some do but as a mix with Ray Tracing being utilized for some and rasterization for others.

And yes an Intel IGP might support it. They actually support most of DX12_1. However very few people will ever game on an Intel or any IGP.

So again DXR is currently supported by Pascal and Vega.
 

bit_user

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No, they didn't say it'd be viable. They're only saying it will work. For it to viable, that would mean it runs at-speed, which they did not claim.
 

bit_user

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What mystifies me is that 8x SS ATAA takes 97.8% longer than 4x, which takes 102% longer than 2x. Of course, there's going to be some noise in those measurements, but they suggest it completely dominates their rendering time. That doesn't exactly strike me as a win.
 
Perhaps the idea is that it's faster than regular SSAA, while producing results that look relatively close. The paper seems a bit vague on how performance compares to SSAA though. It sounds like the numbers may be describing only the time it takes to apply the AA, not including the time to render the rest of the scene. But they don't appear to mention how long rendering the rest of the scene takes, or how long regular SSAA would take, just that the total time for this method was within the 33ms necessary to maintain 30fps. My impression is that performance may be better than supersampling the full scene, but is still likely a lot slower than post-process AA or older techniques like MSAA, making it still impractical to use in most cases where performance might be a concern.
 

Joe Black

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I actually prefer to just leave anti-aliasing off. It satisfies the pixel art junkie in me a tad while I can still appreciate the 3D rendering tech. On a high res screen there's not much to complain about. The fogginess of AA feels a bit like being near sighted to me.
 

TJ Hooker

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Are the time listed in ms for the various levels of ATAA frame times? I was wondering if they were referring to the length of the time window in which all frames are sampled in order to provide AA for the frame currently being rendered. Or something like that.
 

jimmysmitty

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Viable - capable of working successfully; feasible

That says to me that if Microsoft claims it will work on current in-market hardware then it is viable. Whatever the word Microsoft and nVidia have stated that DXR will run on current hardware and as I said in the second quote nVidia currently states that, to no surprise, that the Titan V would be the best performing.

How about this:

https://www.anandtech.com/show/12547/expanding-directx-12-microsoft-announces-directx-raytracing

Volta supports hardware and software RayTracing (and specifically nVidias RTX) while prior generations Support software RayTracing(specifically DXR).

its not that hard. Any DX12 GPU will be viable, yes viable, for DXR. Performance will vary with Volta obviously being the best since it have built in hardware for it.
 
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