News Nvidia Reflex Latency Analyzer Tested: Ultra-Low Latency Gaming

TJ Hooker

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I found this article (and the other related one) a bit confusing because they seem to conflate Nvidia Reflex (NR) and Nvidia Reflex Latency Analzyer (NRLA) and use the terms interchangeably.

NR reduces latency. It is comprised of the NR SDK (which includes a Low Latency Boost feature) which game devs can use, and an Ultra Low Latency Mode in the driver. It does not require a special mouse or monitor. You need a 900 series or newer GPU to take advantage of NR SDK (Boost feature works on any GPU though).

NRLA does not reduce latency, it merely measures latency. It requires a special mouse + monitor. Not seeing anything about GPU requirements.
 
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mac_angel

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I'm also confused at why no one has done any testing with Variable Refresh Rate since it's suppose to be built in with HDMI 2.1. That's a pretty big thing, but not getting any media coverage.
 

AnimeMania

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I understand nothing about this so here are some questions I have:
  1. Doesn't the speed/quality of your Internet connection have a lot to do with your latency.
  2. Won't it be better if this software was able to control your latency so that even though you could have a faster latency, you could tell the software to always give you a latency of 40ms so that no matter the conditions, your game play will always seem the same and your timing will always be the same and consistent. Gamers can get used to playing at any latency as long as it is consistent.
 

Endymio

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After reading the first couple of paragraphs of this article, I strongly suggest the author learn the meaning of the phrase "bury the lede".
 

JarredWaltonGPU

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I found this article (and the other related one) a bit confusing because they seem to conflate Nvidia Reflex (NR) and Nvidia Reflex Latency Analzyer (NRLA) and use the terms interchangeably.

NR reduces latency. It is comprised of the NR SDK (which includes a Low Latency Boost feature) which game devs can use, and an Ultra Low Latency Mode in the driver. It does not require a special mouse or monitor. You need a 900 series or newer GPU to take advantage of NR SDK (Boost feature works on any GPU though).

NRLA does not reduce latency, it merely measures latency. It requires a special mouse + monitor. Not seeing anything about GPU requirements.
I tried to make it clear that the Reflex driver changes and Reflex Latency Analyzer are separate entities. However, there is definitely overlap. Nvidia is pushing these new Reflex enabled monitors and mice as being the top performance (in terms of latency) hardware right now. Buying a Reflex mouse and monitor just happens to also get you Reflex Latency Analyzer.

Nvidia mentioned esports people potentially wanting a way to verify performance (latency) was as low as expected -- eg, for events. The Reflex Latency Analyzer equipped mice and monitors will also have improvements that make the better for latency in general. As an example, Nvidia listed its latency testing results for multiple mice. Where the Logitech G Pro Reflex mouse I used for testing has latency of around 1-2ms, some mice can be as bad as 10+ ms. Many 'good' mice are still in the 5-10ms range. The Asus Chakram Core meanwhile apparently has just 0.5ms of latency.

One of the biggest problems is that, short of using LDAT or a high speed camera, there's no way to actually say how Nvidia Reflex performed before now. With Reflex Latency Analyzer hardware, you can do that ... but only for the display you're testing. I don't currently have LDAT, so that's why I didn't do additional testing to try and compare latency performance with different monitors or mice. Well, that and time.
 

JarredWaltonGPU

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After reading the first couple of paragraphs of this article, I strongly suggest the author learn the meaning of the phrase "bury the lede".
In this case, it's a complex topic, and simply posting the charts at the start would be a disservice. It would imply that all of this newfangled hardware is awesome and you should buy it. Without the context, Reflex Latency Analyzer looks better than it probably is. There's a reason Nvidia is using 360Hz displays, for example. But without additional hardware and testing, we can't say how it compares to 'normal' displays and mice. So, yes, the intro is front-loaded with a lot of extra detail. What is it you wanted to know exactly? Does it reduce latency. Yup. Does it do so better than a 240Hz or 144Hz non-Reflex display? Probably, but with diminishing returns.
 

Endymio

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In this case, it's a complex topic...So, yes, the intro is front-loaded with a lot of extra detail. What is it you wanted to know exactly? ...
First of all -- good article. My quibble was with the structuring; there isn't even a passing reference to what NRLA actually is or does until the ninth paragraph. For those already familiar with NR/NRLA, that structure may work, but in my case it was rather confusing.
 

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