Nvidia Turing & Volta MegaThread

Page 4 - Seeking answers? Join the Tom's Hardware community: where nearly two million members share solutions and discuss the latest tech.

U6b36ef

Distinguished
Dec 9, 2010
571
1
19,015
7


My post was meant in relevance to the fact that one day we might actually be able to buy a Turing card. Sorry, because I didn't mean to cause offence.
 

TechyInAZ

Titan
Moderator
No problem. In that case your post is perfectly acceptable (just might want to add Turing into your post next time).

In the past, we've had huge derailments on megathreads that got somewhat messy which is why we'd like to keep things in the right direction.
 
well people also think that there is no way they going to name the 980 successor as 1080 since how in gaming 1080 is very well associated with 1080p....but they did it anyway. regardless of it's name more important will be how they are going to perform in games.
 

U6b36ef

Distinguished
Dec 9, 2010
571
1
19,015
7
I hpe that the Turing card prices will drop soon. I think that charging 50% more, for Ray Tracing being included on the card is really bad.

Ray Tracing is not even fast enough on the RTX 2000 series cards to be useful. There are so few games supporting RT. It's like some kind of Nvidia con.

From my perspective, e.g. the RTX 20180 Ti , should not be any more expensive than the 1080 Ti was on release. Maybe there should be a small premium for the RT cores, as they cost money to make in incorporate. 50% price rise, for such a small RT performance is out of order.

Or have I got this wrong. Am I just ranting?
 
Last edited:
Well, the first theory (popular one) was they were trying to get rid of extra inventory, but according to nVidia themselves, they've already moved everything, so if prices don't drop soon, I don't know what to say.

On the other hand, GPU refreshes may get longer cycles now, so I would imagine we'll be stuck with the RTX 2K gen for a bit longer than 2 years?

Cheers!
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
I suspect Nvidia will have to match AMD's process node shrink in the near future, so they won't wait all that long. Though they could do what they have in the past and start with smaller GPUs first.

As for the price. 65% increase in die size between the 1080Ti and the 2080Ti, so even with the slightly better process node they are still getting way less chips per wafer. Adoption of a recently released memory as well. There is some justification for the price. I've brought up inflation in many other postings. We've been lucky for years that competition kept things relatively stable but it is not surprising how much the market will bear. ~30% inflation increase since 2005. 8800 GTX launched at $600, so about $800 with inflation. 8800 Ultra launched at $850 or around $1100 today (though that was a little later in 2007). And that isn't counting general increases in memory size and board power output and die size.

Also have to account for the diminishing need for desktop graphics at all. Vast majority of PC gamers are running laptops. Competition there is still fierce and it is kind of cheaper to look at hing end gaming laptops then it is to piece together a top end system.
 
A die shrink doesn't mean they need to improve/change the underlying GPU (architecturally speaking). AMD and nVidia have done it in the past with "limited" versions of some GPUs or for specific markets, so I wouldn't classify a die shrink as the equivalent of a "new GPU". Although it is technically correct, not necessarily accurate in the context we're discussing a "new GPU".

As for the prices... I'm not sure what to think anymore, TBH...  ̄\(ツ)/ ̄

EDIT: Forgot to comment on the laptop vs desktop thing... I have to disagree. Just because of how thermals work a laptop, vis a vis, will never match a desktop in performance nor performance/$. You can have adequate performance at a non mind-blowing price, but never better than a similarly priced desktop. As for how RTX improves this, it doesn't. The MXM equivalent GPUs are way more expensive than their desktop counterparts for some reason. So...

Cheers!
 
Last edited:

Eximo

Titan
Herald
I was more going for a decline in desktops, so pressure to keep discrete GPU prices low isn't there. Not so much the performance difference between desktop and mobile. Whereas on the laptop front there are hundreds of models all vying for sales. Less so on the high end cards, but GPUs like the GTX1060 seem super cheap considered they are wrapped with i5 and i7 processors, decent amounts of ram, and SSDs, a battery, and a screen, etc.

For your average PC gamer, just don't see all that much about the pricing of the high end cards. I'll still buy them when I feel it is reasonable to upgrade, and Nvidia and AMD know that. So those high end cards are worth making for the profit they bring, and the free marketing they get from media outlets who will talk about their new products for them.
 
I'd say that's more of a weird consequence of being stuck with DirectX 9 for so damn long. Games are not that technologically advanced if you compare DX9 based games to DX12. Most if not all still support it, so they're built to run from DX9 gen cards upwards. That opens the market for, what you'd consider lower end hardware, to be competitive with higher end at some resolutions you'd think years ago would not be possible.

Does RTX actually change this? Well, it actually does a bit. Pushing Ray Tracing, as I've said many times, is damn nice.

Cheers!
 

U6b36ef

Distinguished
Dec 9, 2010
571
1
19,015
7
I hope Nvidia shift to another series fairly soon. The 2080Ti has an inherent problem with the GDDR6 memory modules from Micron. Just because of that, they will need to move on. I presume it affects other cards in the range too.

The good news for gamers is that mining is pretty much over for now. However even given that, you would think that there were a lot more RTX cards on the market. Yet they are still quite rare on Amazon UK, and still holding the incredibly high price.

For me Ray Tracing isn't wrth buying a new card for. I know from user's reports, that it is gorgeous. However we read that gamers are not able to max out the ray-tracing settings and keep a good frame rate.

I was lucky I bought a 1080 Ti just before they vanished almost completey from stores. It still holds up in all games at 1440p. (Althoug I don't really buy new titles on release. I guess Metro: Exodus would stretch the 1080 ti to far to maintain 60fps min. Will wait and see on that.)
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Well I guess neither Micron or Samsung have gotten the 16Gbps GDDR6 to mass production yet. I imagine that is the speed the next cards will use, if not more. Once again Nvidia is in a position to take it slow, so they probably will. About a 2 year cadence they have going between architectures, barely at 7 months for Turing now.
 

Eximo

Titan
Herald
Din't realize till now but this generation there is only one model of RTX2080Ti which supports single slot water-cooling.
Really, do you mean by default? There are usually some blower style cards that have no ports in the second slot, and when you buy a waterblock kit you can opt for a single slot bracket.

But I see the Zotac that comes pre-configured with a water block that is single slot. But also the ASUS Turbo that could easily be converted to single slot.
 
Really, do you mean by default? There are usually some blower style cards that have no ports in the second slot, and when you buy a waterblock kit you can opt for a single slot bracket.

But I see the Zotac that comes pre-configured with a water block that is single slot. But also the ASUS Turbo that could easily be converted to single slot.
ZOTAC RTX2080Ti ARCTIC STORM(water block model) is dual slot as it has DP going up second slot. This makes ASUS TURBO only RTX2080Ti model capable of being converted to single slot card.

GTX1080Ti had 4 models. Not having single slot card options becomes painful when it limits custom builds.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY