[SOLVED] NZXT X62 Radiator loud sound?

dy3p

Distinguished
Mar 20, 2011
11
0
18,510
0
Hi all,

Sorry but I'm a bit annoyed here and I hope someone can help me. :( The X62 was working fine until we moved locations and I cleaned the air filters. I did not change anything at all with the settings and now I am confronted with this dilemma. It doesn't sound like it's rattling or bubbling. It mainly sounds like the fan itself is too loud. Wasn't like this before. Oh and I can't see the fan icon from the cam software which makes me adjust the speed of the fan. Please help! 😪

Case: NZXT S340 Elite
Mobo: ASUS Hero IX
Cooling: AIO NZXT x62 (vertically placed)
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
With aios, especially the asetek designs, the paste breaking seal is a last resort. The stock paste is pretty gummy, almost like duct seal and the pump itself weighs next to nothing. For a good sized tower air-cooler, they don't take well to moves, but liquid cooling is fine.

Most normally it's an air bubble as darkbreeze said and tilting the case so the tubing/radiator is higher than the pump is a good way to clear that. Can even do it while the pc is running, you'll hear an audible difference if it was a bubble and it clears.

Cam software itself is quite good. Fan curves ability, pump speeds variation etc is far superior to standard bios, and is done through windows, so no constant reboots to mess with bios fans. However, it can be temperamental when it comes to windows updates, power downs, anything that even comes close to messing with its drivers, so often a redo of the software is warranted. As darkbreeze said.

If the noise is actually from the fans, not the pump, a good cleaning usually fixes that. Over time, dust will build up in a 'donut' exactly opposite the fan blades/motor housing, on the radiator. During moves, this 'donut' can be dislodged and end up stuck to a fan blade. That chunk of dust does 2 things. It's heavy (comparatively) so will change the pitch of the blade. This'll set up an imbalance/wobble (think ceiling fan) and you'll get a racket from the fan bearings/blades as they'll bounce in their seat. It also changes the aerodynamics of the blade, so at high speeds its like a banner flapping in the breeze, so will set up a loud humming .

So a good cleaning might also be in order. While there, check on any stray wiring, it's not uncommon for moves to have a wire shift and come into contact with the fan.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
If the fan sounds too loud, then it's probably because movement of the system has caused an air bubble to become trapped in the pump or lines, and coolant is not circulating normally. I would recommend that you download either HWinfo (NOT HWmonitor) or Core Temp, and take a peek at what your CPU core/package temps are doing. It's likely that the fan IS running fast and loud because there is now a cooling issue.

I would try tilting the case all the way backwards, forwards and side to side, to try and get the bubble/air pocket to release and move back into the radiator where it belongs. Contrary to common belief, these systems are not generally completely full of liquid. There is usually some amount of air inside and that air can form a pocket in some cases.

I would also double check that none of the connections have become disconnected and that you can see both fan and pump RPMs in either the BIOS or your monitoring software, which in this case would be CAM. It's also possible that you may have to reset the fan profile in CAM, as disconnecting power from the unit usually causes it to revert to the default configuration for NZXT AIO coolers, Hue+ units and Grid+ controllers, depending on the generation and model.

You may want to try to uninstall and reinstall your CAM software as well, if you are unable to access it's settings in Windows. It's fairly important that you verify that you don't have a problem with the pump not working or an air pocket causing coolant to not flow, first though.
 
I would pull the Pump/block off the cpu, clean and reapply thermal past. The move may have moved the block braking the older thermal past giving you bad thermals. While doing this i would also check all the fan plugs to make sure nothing came loose.



If the CPU thermals are not good the the fans will ramp up to try and keep the CPU cool.
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Herald
With aios, especially the asetek designs, the paste breaking seal is a last resort. The stock paste is pretty gummy, almost like duct seal and the pump itself weighs next to nothing. For a good sized tower air-cooler, they don't take well to moves, but liquid cooling is fine.

Most normally it's an air bubble as darkbreeze said and tilting the case so the tubing/radiator is higher than the pump is a good way to clear that. Can even do it while the pc is running, you'll hear an audible difference if it was a bubble and it clears.

Cam software itself is quite good. Fan curves ability, pump speeds variation etc is far superior to standard bios, and is done through windows, so no constant reboots to mess with bios fans. However, it can be temperamental when it comes to windows updates, power downs, anything that even comes close to messing with its drivers, so often a redo of the software is warranted. As darkbreeze said.

If the noise is actually from the fans, not the pump, a good cleaning usually fixes that. Over time, dust will build up in a 'donut' exactly opposite the fan blades/motor housing, on the radiator. During moves, this 'donut' can be dislodged and end up stuck to a fan blade. That chunk of dust does 2 things. It's heavy (comparatively) so will change the pitch of the blade. This'll set up an imbalance/wobble (think ceiling fan) and you'll get a racket from the fan bearings/blades as they'll bounce in their seat. It also changes the aerodynamics of the blade, so at high speeds its like a banner flapping in the breeze, so will set up a loud humming .

So a good cleaning might also be in order. While there, check on any stray wiring, it's not uncommon for moves to have a wire shift and come into contact with the fan.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I would pull the Pump/block off the cpu, clean and reapply thermal past.
Thermal paste isn't going to suddenly be a problem after a move. If the paste application was good before, it will be fine after. Non-possible issue in this type of scenario. Perhaps if it had just been installed for the first time, maybe, but not to go from working fine to not working fine or "different" from just being moved and some minor cleaning.

UNLESS of course the water block was not securely fastened in the first place, but THAT would have caused thermal issues long before you moved the unit, so if you didn't have them before, you shouldn't have them now, not due to the paste anyhow.
 
Reactions: Karadjgne

ASK THE COMMUNITY

TRENDING THREADS