Question One modem, two routers, and two separate networks?

Jan 31, 2019
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I'm wondering if there is a way to connect two routers to one modem and have them being on two separate networks. I want to do this because I have my gaming computer and my families computers on the first network but I want to port forward on a server computer I recently purchased but I want to make sure that if the server is compromised that there will be no way to access the other network. I've heard of DMZ's but I already have a separate router I could use. If I can't setup two separate networks would a DMZ be just as secure or even more secure? My ISP is Spectrum and the two routers are both Netgear.
 

anotherdrew

Estimable
Short answer. Yes, you can create 2 networks by connecting 2 routers to your modem (assuming you have 2 IP addresses or your modem does NAT).

Is it more secure than the DMZ feature? Probably ... it really depends on the quality of the DMZ implementation.
 
Reactions: evtyongames
Jan 31, 2019
13
0
10
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Short answer. Yes, you can create 2 networks by connecting 2 routers to your modem (assuming you have 2 IP addresses or your modem does NAT).

Is it more secure than the DMZ feature? Probably ... it really depends on the quality of the DMZ implementation.
How can I check if i have 2 IP's and I'm assuming I can just google my modem and see if it has NAT.
 
Alright, thank you guys for the help!
Just keep in mind that with this setup (you actually will have three routers, your "modem" is router if it has four ports) port-forwarding will be very complicated. And your networks will be completely separate - no (easy) way to access a printer on one network from device on the other. There won't be any difference if these two networks were connected to two different ISPs across the globe.
 
Jan 31, 2019
13
0
10
0
Just keep in mind that with this setup (you actually will have three routers, your "modem" is router if it has four ports) port-forwarding will be very complicated. And your networks will be completely separate - no (easy) way to access a printer on one network from device on the other. There won't be any difference if these two networks were connected to two different ISPs across the globe.
Yea, I’ve decided to just get another internet plan and have two modems and two routers.
 

digitalgriffin

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Jan 29, 2008
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There are a couple ways to do this.

Some model routers offer a guest network mode which isolates the devices on two subnets. Unfortunately the vast majority of these are wifi guest nets. So everything on your non server sude would be connected by either by wifi or a bridge. If you get the right model devices and configure then correctly and place the bridges close to one another you can get well over 1gbps. Its a bit of a redneck fix but...

Dmz and port forwarding is option 2.

Option 3 is isolate your personal pcs behind multiple layers. Use an active switch and assign one router one subnet and a second router a second subnet. You could use bitdefender box 2 to protect your personal pcs. It looks for people attacking or port scanning your network.

https://www.pluralsight.com/blog/it-ops/simplify-routing-how-to-organize-your-network-into-smaller-subnets

Pfsense with snort is another good option. Snort is an intrusion detection package. Problem is it has a hell of a learning curve. Ots also very jard to configure if games require upnp. Youll have to jump through multiple hoops and it wont work if two people in your house decide to play something like counter striie at tye same time.

Please be aware without proper traffic shaping at the appropriate point that your family's bandwidth may slow down your server. If your server needs gaurenteed priority youll need professional hardware. Consumer grade qos wont cut it.
 
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