Patriot Ignite 480GB SSD Review

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gnarr

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"A few tenths of a second in each service time benchmark might not seem like a lot, but over the course of a day, they add up. Admittedly, choosing one SSD over another won't double your productivity. Would you turn down an extra 10 or 20 minutes of getting stuff done, though?"
Your reaction time is around 150-300ms, so having an SSD that is 200ms slower than the fastest SSD is not going to slow you down the least. It won't even give you 10 seconds of extra "getting stuff done" over a whole workday unless your work resolves around only opening and closing applications.

It might maybe save you 2-3 seconds when opening large Photoshop, After Effects, Premiere or Resolve projects, but as a video editor, I know you will most likely be working on the same project the entire day, and if you're opening many projects per day, they are usually rather small and thus will load in a blink of an eye.
 

2Be_or_Not2Be

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@gnarr - I think the main point is being glossed over - if a SSD can finish a task x% slightly faster than another SSD/HDD, then it's allowing you x% more time to do *anything* on your computer. It doesn't matter if you went off to get coffee or if you were sitting there waiting on it to finish the task, your computer is now waiting on your input that x% faster. This has nothing to do with your reaction time or even opening files.

During the course of a year, anything that allows you more time to do work on your computer makes you more efficient.
 
How well does this controller respond to loss of power or hard reset?

Too many SSDs on the market become bricked and unrecognized by the motherboard even after just a single loss of power.

I recommend reviewers do about 50 hard power-offs and see if the SSD survives.
 

mf Red

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How well does this controller respond to loss of power or hard reset?

Too many SSDs on the market become bricked and unrecognized by the motherboard even after just a single loss of power.

I recommend reviewers do about 50 hard power-offs and see if the SSD survives.
My R9 290x was causing hard power-offs when loading into games and my 840 Pro is still functioning just fine. I probably only did 20 hard resets though not 50 so maybe you're right.
 


The Samsungs usually don't have that problem, lucky for you.
 

palladin9479

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The Samsung drives are of exceptionally high stability, almost enterprise level. I've never heard of one getting bricked by unexpected loss of power.

The thing to realize is that SSD's are basically a computer within a computer. Inside a SSD is a CPU, memory and an OS. When the drive powers on, it loads it's OS off the firmware which then goes about managing the flash cells and acting like a miniature SAN storage processor. From your computers point of view you only see a storage device, but that's being abstracted by the SSD's OS. You actually have between four to eight storage devices that are organized in a pseudo RAID configuration with the SSD's OS presenting it as a single device.

So unexpected loss of power will have the same effect on the SSD's OS as it does on your OS, corrupted data. Now modern OS's are written in such a way as to cope with potential data corruption caused by a random loss of power, but not all SSD's firmwares (OS's) are capable of doing that and thus the bricking occurs.

 

pilsner

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I really do not like it, but it seems that at this point in time, choosing a Samsung 850 Pro SSD is still the thing to do.
 

giantbucket

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this would only be relevant if an SSD was just too darned slow and was holding you up, and YOU were waiting for IT to do something. 99.973% of the time, the SSD / computer is done while you're still thinking or you're distracted on the phone with a client or coworker. the gating item isn't the SSD, so the fact that it's 3% faster is irrelevant outside of a benchmark.
 

2Be_or_Not2Be

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No, what I'm saying is that if the SSD finishes x task faster, that in itself makes it more efficient. It doesn't matter if the end-user doesn't make use of the time after the SSD finishes the task; the SSD itself is more efficient.

If we try to say, "well, making something faster won't help the end-user because they're doing other things or reacting too slowly", then you almost might as well not try to make *anything* more efficient. That was the point of my responding to @gnarr - the end-user's reaction time doesn't really matter.

Thinking solely of the end-user directly using the SSD in his computer also doesn't include the consideration of SSDs being used by servers. Against, if a SSD performs faster (finishes x task even seconds faster), then that allows the next I/O request to be serviced even faster. All of that aggregated over time equals more performance & true efficiency gains, especially on a server that is heavily used.
 

giantbucket

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anyone who uses a low-end budget Patriot SSD on a server should be shot on the spot, no questions asked, not even a "yo!".

and the article (which is partially what we're discussing here) is about the single-user being able to do another 10-20 minutes (!!!) of work in a day simply because an SSD was a few seconds faster. just.... no. maybe if the user completely skips lunch (s)he can get an extra 15mins of work done, but not a slightly faster SSD churning their emails or saving that spreadsheet.
 

none12345

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Heh arguing over user effficiency in terms of milliseconds is a waste of time.

You want more user efficiency, chase the large gains. Ban their smart phones lol.
 

aldaia

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Heh arguing over user effficiency in terms of milliseconds is a waste of time.

You want more user efficiency, chase the large gains. Ban their smart phones lol.
I can't agree more. When I first switched from HD to SSD at home (Kingston SSDNow V100 128GB) I really noticed a big difference in computer responsiveness. Recently I got a Samsung SSD 850 EVO 250GB at work. The 850 is probably the best consumer SSD out there, while the V100 is a very bad performer. What benchmarks tell is that the 850 is 2 to 8 times faster (depending on the benchmark). We are not talking a few % here, but 100% to 700% faster. Yet I don't notice any apreciable deference in computer responsivenes between the two systems. So, unless tasks are very disk intensive, the important factors in a SSD are price and reliability. In most day to day tasks, speed differences between SSDs is just a question of bragging rights.
 

tical2399

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Heh arguing over user effficiency in terms of milliseconds is a waste of time.

You want more user efficiency, chase the large gains. Ban their smart phones lol.
I can't agree more. When I first switched from HD to SSD at home (Kingston SSDNow V100 128GB) I really noticed a big difference in computer responsiveness. Recently I got a Samsung SSD 850 EVO 250GB at work. The 850 is probably the best consumer SSD out there, while the V100 is a very bad performer. What benchmarks tell is that the 850 is 2 to 8 times faster (depending on the benchmark). We are not talking a few % here, but 100% to 700% faster. Yet I don't notice any apreciable deference in computer responsivenes between the two systems. So, unless tasks are very disk intensive, the important factors in a SSD are price and reliability. In most day to day tasks, speed differences between SSDs is just a question of bragging rights.
Agreed. I have a 120 gig V300 and it runs fine. I just bought a 1tb 850 evo for steam but I copied my os over to it using the included software just to see if there would be any difference and it showed no difference in usual task. It didn't even copy night and day faster, only slightly
 

uglyduckling81

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I got an OCZ Agility 120gb as my first SSD. It was over $500 in Australia. Have you ever tried to use someone's PC without and SSD after using your own with an SSD. I stopped doing tech support on my friends PC's as it was infuriating. I still had to fix my mums PC which drove me crazy. Thank goodness they are cheap enough for everyone to have one now, including my Mum.
 
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