PC shutsdown after 30 seconds

Oct 5, 2018
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I recently moved to another country and brought my pc (components) with me and today i bought a case for it so i built it and it turns off after 30-40 seconds. I checked all the cables and all the components and took it apart twice and built it again and it is the same story..
 
Oct 5, 2018
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Motherboard is Msi B75MA-P45
Graphic GTX750 Ti
Intel i3 processor
And Armaggeddon Pro 275x power supply

I tried different outlet and powerstrip,and it is same voltage here and where i used to live. Tried disconnecting everything and leaving only motherboard but no difference. I used this same components 10 days ago just in a different case.

I think the model number is AV27Cc1706000057
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That is not the model number, at least not of any existing power supply that Google knows of. And Google pretty much knows them all. There should be a label ON the power supply with it's specifications. The model number and brand should be on there as well. If you can take a picture of the label and post it it would help to identify the model.

Probably not that important though if it was working previously with the same components.

I would take it all back apart and bench test it. It's possible you accidentally got a standoff in the wrong place or left a screw between the case and the board. Something.

Also, make sure you have connected the CPU cooler to the CPU_FAN header, or else it will probably do exactly what it's doing now or possibly not even start at all with no CPU cooler reference signal.

 
Oct 5, 2018
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I bench tested my PSU and it worked, it isnt turning off. So i took out everything and put back in just my motherboard and PSU and connected just those 2 and i have a same problem again. It works for 30 seconds then turns off and back on. Like short circuit. My cpu cooler has been connected the whole time
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
That's not a bench test. This is a bench test. Get yourself a piece of cardboard to put the motherboard on and do as follows:

http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1753671/bench-troubleshooting.html

Plus, it would STILL be nice to know what the model of your power supply is. I'm about 90% sure this is a PSU issue, but I don't want to say you have a PSU shaped object that would be better off as a paper weight without knowing that for sure based on the model number. The number you provided earlier is not the model number. Every PSU I've ever Googled the model number of in the last four years has returned SOME kind of result. That number, nothing. And, it does not follow normal model numbering guidelines so it's pretty doubtful.

Cannot express how important it is to know what unit we are dealing with. If necessary, remove the PSU from the case to find the label and identify the model number OR post a pic of the label on the PSU here.

http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-2580030/detailed-instructions-posting-images-tom-hardware.html
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I don't suppose you know anybody with another power supply you can try, being as you just moved? If not, you may be stuck with just needing to get a new unit, except you'll want to get a good one this time. Those Armageddon units are not very good. In fact, they're probably really bad.

http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-2448246/armaggeddon-voltron-gold-silver-psu.html

Plus, 275w, if it was actually even supplying that amount, wouldn't even meet the system requirements for the 750ti which calls for a 350w unit, minimum, factoring in the rest of the system.

http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm

If you've actually done the work, as outlined, to test the rest of the components then the PSU is the main culprit. Honestly, I'm surprised that unit ever ran at all with that power supply. From what I can find, that is mainly what we'd categorize as a dumpster fire quality unit. The kind of power supply that generally results in this:

https://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/11/26/exploding_computer_vs_reg_reader/


While it's possible the PSU is NOT the problem, that is sure as heck where I'd start.

I don't know what country you reside in, and I know that sometimes it's hard to come by good units in some regions, but when possible, when it comes time to get that PSU, I'd stick to the following if you can.

Higher 80plus certification doesn't mean anything, UNLESS it's on an already known to be high quality PSU platform. For example, a Seasonic Prime platinum unit is going to be a better product than a Seasonic Prime Gold unit, because we already know the Prime platform is very good, and platinum efficiency along with it shows there are some improvements internally to account for the higher efficiency.

In a case like that, it might be worth it. It's likely the unit will create less heat, it will probably have better performance in regard to ripple, noise and voltage regulation. It might shave a few pennies, or dollars, off the electric bill over the course of a year.

Other than that, it is not going to perform any better than the same platform with Gold efficiency. On the other hand, just because a unit has Titanium 80plus ratings doesn't mean the unit is any good at all. For example, there are Raidmax units with Titanium efficiency and I wouldn't trust one of those to power a light bulb. There are a lot of units like this out there.

80plus only has relevance if the platform is already known to be a good one.

Seasonic. Just about anything made by Seasonic is good quality for the most part. There are really no bad Seasonic units and only a very few that are even somewhat mediocre. They do make a few less-good quality OEM style units, but mostly those are not going to be units you come across at most vendors, and they are still not bad. Also, the S12II and M12II 520 and 620w units are older, group regulated models. At one time they were among the best units you could buy. Now, they are outdated and not as good as almost any other Seasonic models. They are however still better than a LOT of newer designs by other manufacturers.

The Seasonic 520w and 620w S12II/M12II units CAN be used on newer Intel platforms, if you turn off C6/C7 in the bios, but I'd really recommend a newer platform whenever possible. Prices are usually pretty good on those though, so sometimes it's worth accepting the lack of DC-DC on the internal platform. Higher capacity versions of the High current gamer are not based on that platform, so they are fine. Those being the 750w and higher versions. Antec Edge units are ok too, but reviews indicate that they have noisy fan profiles.

Corsair. The CX and CXm units are ok as a budget option, but I do not recommend pairing them with gaming cards. The newer 2017 models of CX and CXm are better than the older ones, so if it specifically says 2017 model, or it has a capacity other than an even 100, like 550w, 650w, 750w, etc., then it's likely at least better than those older ones. Aside from that, any of the TX, RMx, RMi, HX, HXi, AX or AXi units are good. Those are listed from best to worst, with the best being the AX and AXi units.

Antec. The True power classic units are made by Seasonic, and are very good, but are not modular. The High current gamer 520w and 620w, or any other PSU you see on the market that is 520w or 620w, are also made by Seasonic, based on the S12II and M12II platform for modern versions, and are pretty good units but again they are an older platform that is group regulated so if you go with a Haswell or newer Intel configuration you will want to avoid those because they do not support the C6/C7 Intel low power states.

The Antec High current gamer 750w and 850w units are very good and are not the older design, which came in 520w and 620w capacities and were good for back then but again, are an aging Seasonic platform that is not the best choice most of the time these days. Occasionally, these older units MIGHT be the best unit available and you could do worse than one of them, but a newer DC-DC platform is desirable when possible if it doesn't mean sacrificing quality elsewhere in the platform. There are however older and newer HCG models, so exact model number will likely be a factor if choosing one of these however both the older models and the newer models are good.

Super Flower. They are like Seasonic and they make power supplies for a variety of other companies, like EVGA. Super Flower units are usually pretty good. I'd stick to the Leadex, Leadex II and Golden Green models.

EVGA. They have good and bad. Bad are the W1, N1, B1, B3 (All models except the 650w model) and G1 NEX models. Good models are the B2, B3 650w, G2, G2L, G3, GQ, P2 and T2 models.

FSP. They used to be very mediocre, and are a PSU manufacturer like Seasonic and Super Flower, although not as well trusted based on historical performance. Currently the FSP Hydro G and Hydro X units are pretty good.

I would avoid Thermaltake and Cooler Master. They do have a few good units, but most of the models they sell are either poor or mediocre, and the ones they have that ARE good are usually way overpriced.

And most of the models I have linked to the reviews of at the following link are at least good, with most of them being fantastic.

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-3612443/power-supply-discussion-thread.html
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
So, I got your PM, but there's not much I can tell you that I haven't already. The bottom line is, it's likely to be the PSU and getting another cheap PSU is likely to land you right back in this same spot.

It could certainly be the motherboard, as it's possible you did something wrong and shorted something out, but I can't say that for sure. The fact is that anytime you move PC components from one place to another over a long distance, or even across town, everything should be be packed in with protection against damage from bumps and jarring. It doesn't take much of a bump to bust something loose inside a power supply or on a motherboard. Your current PSU is not good. Moving a not good PSU is very likely to create problems that maybe weren't as bad before.

I don't think there's much else you can do without getting or borrowing a good power supply to make sure that isn't the problem. It might not be, but as I said, that's where I'd be looking at to start with.

Might also want to look at both sides of the motherboard for any burnt areas or capacitors that look like they are leaking or bulging.
 

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