Question Pc suddenly crashes when opening a game

Aug 8, 2019
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So, I got a brand new PC just 3-4 days ago and I've been having some problems these last 2 days. When I got the computer I was able to play CSGO just fine but yesterday I joined a game and suddenly the PC showed a green screen and then crashed. I reopened it and tried reconnecting to the same game and same thing happened (sometimes it was showing a grey screen).The wierd thing is that I was able to play 4 minutes of warmup just fine but when the main game started it crashed immediately. Then I tried stressing each piece. I stress tested the RAM, just fine, the CPU and GPU, the same. Then I tried playing another game thinking it was the game's fault. I opened Just Cause 3 and it crashed again. Then I looked deeper and I ended up maxing out the GPU power limit and fan speed. Opened Just Cause 3, surprise, no crash and i played for like 30 minutes just fine before going to sleep. Now, today I tried playing Dying Light and the intro was just fine (the short clip at the beggining) and suddenly the moment I am able to play poof, grey screen and 2 seconds later crash. What i noticed is that everything goes off (monitor, mouse, keyboard etc) except the mobo and fans. The mobo is sometimes blinking red lights, one after another in order after the crash.
This has happened like 6 times and im really worried about the health of my PC.

Specs:
B450 Aorus Pro
MSI Rx 570 8gb
2x8gb Ram
Ryzen 5 2600X
Antec Earthwatts Gold Pro 750W
Games are installed on an HDD and windows on an SSD.

I've also noticed that the GPU goes up to 85C and I tried maxing the fan speed but nothing new happens.
I just tried playing again, launched Just Cause 3 just fine then I launched Dying Light after closing the former and played just fine for 2 minutes, then after a cutscene I wanted to see if there are subtitle available so I went to the settings and it crashed AGAIN.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I stress tested the RAM, just fine.
How, EXACTLY?

How, EXACTLY?

Same thing, HOW exactly did you "stress test" it. There are a lot of "tests" out there, and a lot of people who cluelessly use them not knowing any better, that are largely either useless or not the right test for what you are trying to determine.


First thing you should do is verify whether or not you have the MOST recent motherboard BIOS version installed. If you do not, then update.

Also, make 100% sure you have the memory (RAM) installed in the second and fourth slots over, going left to right, starting at the CPU socket. So, the fourth slot will be the one closest to the edge of the motherboard. If they are not installed there, move them. That is the correct 2 DIMM population for ALL dual channel motherboards that use DDR4 memory and MOST boards that use DDR3 memory. Those are typically labeled A2 and B2 slots, but in some cases might be CALLED DDR4_1 and DDR4_2 or some other naming scheme depending on the manufacturer but they are always in the same locations of the second and fourth slots over from the CPU and are typically the same color although some boards may use the same color for all four DIMM slots.

Next thing you should do is make sure you have the latest AMD B450 chipset drivers installed. Use the ones from the AMD website, not the motherboard manufacturers product page for that driver. Also, make sure that the LAN or WiFI, audio and any relevant storage controller drivers (That are not RAID specific) from the motherboard's product page are also installed. Even if you THINK they are already up to date, I would go ahead and RE-install those specific motherboard drivers to be sure and in case there was perhaps a problem with a previous driver installed or the possibility that Windows has overridden the correct driver versions.

I would also very much recommend doing a CLEAN install of the AMD graphics drivers.

 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I stress tested the RAM, just fine.
How, EXACTLY?

How, EXACTLY?

Same thing, HOW exactly did you "stress test" it. There are a lot of "tests" out there, and a lot of people who cluelessly use them not knowing any better, that are largely either useless or not the right test for what you are trying to determine.


First thing you should do is verify whether or not you have the MOST recent motherboard BIOS version installed. If you do not, then update.

Also, make 100% sure you have the memory (RAM) installed in the second and fourth slots over, going left to right, starting at the CPU socket. So, the fourth slot will be the one closest to the edge of the motherboard. If they are not installed there, move them. That is the correct 2 DIMM population for ALL dual channel motherboards that use DDR4 memory and MOST boards that use DDR3 memory. Those are typically labeled A2 and B2 slots, but in some cases might be CALLED DDR4_1 and DDR4_2 or some other naming scheme depending on the manufacturer but they are always in the same locations of the second and fourth slots over from the CPU and are typically the same color although some boards may use the same color for all four DIMM slots.

Next thing you should do is make sure you have the latest AMD B450 chipset drivers installed. Use the ones from the AMD website, not the motherboard manufacturers product page for that driver. Also, make sure that the LAN or WiFI, audio and any relevant storage controller drivers (That are not RAID specific) from the motherboard's product page are also installed. Even if you THINK they are already up to date, I would go ahead and RE-install those specific motherboard drivers to be sure and in case there was perhaps a problem with a previous driver installed or the possibility that Windows has overridden the correct driver versions.

I would also very much recommend doing a CLEAN install of the AMD graphics drivers.

 
Aug 8, 2019
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How, EXACTLY?
I used MSI Kombustor for the GPU
Cinebench for CPU
and some other program that i dont remember for the RAM.
The RAM is actually in 1 and 3 slots so I'll change that and see, thank you for that.
Drivers were installed by me from the official sites and such but I will reinstall them just in case. I'll reply after having done so. Thank you in advance.
 

Ketchup79

Respectable
Anything over 80 on that video card is too high, and is probably what is causing your green screens. If you look in the case, are the fans on this video card actually spinning? Where did you get the card? As the RX 580 has been out for a while.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Cinebench, tells you nothing. It is nothing more than a benchmark. It is NOT a stress test. It is not a diagnostic tool, except that EXTREMELY poor Cinebench performance MIGHT tell you that something is "off". Wrong tool for the job. It literally has nothing to do with testing stability OR thermal compliance.

Better, by far, would be to run ASUS Realbench, or Prime 95 Small FFT (AVX, AVX2 disabled in settings) or Memtest86 (For physical memory problems or stability assurance).

There are outlines on how to run these tests located in both these threads in the specific testing sections, but I'd read the rest of this and the following posts before worrying about running them.



After moving the memory, it would be a good idea to do a hard reset of the BIOS in order to reconfigure the hardware tables which would have been set based on the the PREVIOUS memory configuration, which was obviously not optimal. BUT, before doing THAT, I would also make sure that you do in fact have the latest motherboard BIOS version installed or else you will end up having to go through setting up your BIOS settings again, twice, instead of once. Once you are sure you have the latest BIOS version installed (After MOVING the memory to the correct slots to ensure no problems during the BIOS update process) THEN go ahead and do a hard reset of the BIOS as follows.


BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.



Also, make sure you have ALL the available Windows updates installed, and it is imperative that you have not only the latest graphics drivers installed, but that you start from a clean slate with a CLEAN install as outlined in the guide. I would wait to do that until you have done the rest of the changes to the memory and BIOS, then update the graphics drivers with a clean install. Then, after that, if you STILL have problems, we can look at other potential causes.

At that point you would want to probably start looking at whether there is a problem with the CPU having bent pins, or a CPU cooler that is tightened unevenly which can cause it to ACT as though it had bent pins, or some other type of in game setting that might be affecting stability.
 
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Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Anything over 80 on that video card is too high, and is probably what is causing your green screens. If you look in the case, are the fans on this video card actually spinning? Where did you get the card? As the RX 580 has been out for a while.
He doesn't have an RX 580 to begin with. However, 85 degrees is definitely too high for that card, and this MIGHT be a matter of insufficient cooling THROUGH the case, or a misconfigured cooling fan profile on the card itself.

Make sure to set a reasonable custom or preset cooling fan profile in whatever you are using for GPU fan controls such as Afterburner. Also, try removing the side panel to determine if lack of sufficient cool ambient air is the cause of the GPU overheating or if some other factor such as a faulty or damaged card might be in play. If it is a lack of airflow through the case, running it with the side panel off SHOULD tell you that. If so, then you can address the addition of sufficient case fans to correct the problem or reconfigure the fan curve for the case fans that are installed if those are set too low.

Knowing what case, how many case fans, what direction EVERY case fan that is installed is actually blowing, would be helpful.
 
Aug 8, 2019
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Knowing what case, how many case fans, what direction EVERY case fan that is installed is actually blowing, would be helpful.
I have the Cougar MX330-G Case, all are stock fans except an additional Corsair Air Series AF140. Now for the direction i think that additional fan is blowing out. Apart from that, i noticed something off... there is a label near the RAM slots that says "DDR4_4, DDR4_3...." and so on but the text is located just before the RAM, after the CPU. So does that mean that I need to put it in slot 1 and 3 right from the CPU or the way u told me? (I placed them the way u told me).
85 degrees is definitely too high
I meant 85 degrees under load, right now its at 49-50 and it usually reaches 56 max while idle. Would additional fans help with this?
After installing the drivers and all I'll try playing some games and we'll see.
 

Ketchup79

Respectable
Yes, 85 is too high under any condition for that card. As I mentioned previously, check the card and make sure the fans are actually spinning. If you just bought the card, I would return it, as that is way too hot for a new RX 570 working properly.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Yes, 85 is too high under any condition for that card.
Exactly. 75°C is the maximum under full load for the RX 570 from the reviews and specifications I've read. 85°C is well into problem territory ALTHOUGH I'd think this would throttle before simply crashing or shutting down. Are you overclocking that card? If so, revert to the stock settings and then do a clean install of the drivers. In fact, do a clean install as I mentioned before, anyhow, because it COULD simply be a driver issue. Also, take the side panel off for now like I said. You're not going to hurt anything running it with the side panel off for a while. And it might tell you a lot of what is going on. Make sure the fans are actually running on the graphics card as mentioned as well.

As far as the case fans, you're going to have to get a LOT more specific than that. I need to know what EACH and EVERY fan, for EVERY location (INCLUDING where that location IS, exactly, as in, front bottom, front middle, top middle, top rear, rear-rear, etc.) is doing as far as intake (In) or exhaust (out).

It is very important. A LOT of owners install their fans incorrectly to where they are fighting each other and not presenting a good airpath that consists of front or bottom intake passing through the case and out the top rear and rear exhaust locations. A clear stream and airpath of intake to exhaust. One wrongly configured fan can ruin the entire configuration of airflow.
 

Ketchup79

Respectable
Just to be clear, when you say "I got a brand new PC just 3-4 days ago...", does that mean you got the parts and built a new PC 3-4 days ago, or you bought a new PC with the specifications you listed?
 
Aug 8, 2019
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check the card and make sure the fans are actually spinning
yes they are spinning when under load, when idle they are not.
85°C is well into problem territory
i was playing Dying Light right now and the temp was somewhere around 75C, the only difference is that i removed the side panel like you said and also i was running the game on windowed mode this time. Although the 1st time i run the game the PC crashed, running it again seemed to work perfectly fine.
does that mean you got the parts and built a new PC 3-4 days ago
i got a professional to build it 5 days ago and recieved it 4 days ago (he didnt have the parts shipped)

I will run some more tests and if everything is fine ill then mark as best answer
 

Ketchup79

Respectable
That is telling me you have bad airflow. Temps should actually go up a little when the side panel is off, not down. The main problem I see it that the case only comes with one 120mm fan in the back. I don't know what the speed it (a monitoring app might tell you if it has a 3-pin plug) but I am going to say that isn't adequate for a current system.

Where is the AF140 mounted in the case? The front?
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
GPU temp should not, ever, go UP when the LEFT side panel, which is the one that gives you access to the motherboard and hardware, is off. It should ALWAYS go down. Temperatures can never be less than ambient and you can never supply the GPU with more ambient air than when there is no panel, and therefore it is IN the ambient air. Panel on and fans blazing is STILL only trying to GET ambient air INTO the case. No case panel, no need to GET ambient air into the case because it is already USING ambient air which is all around it then.

If your temps dropped from 85 to 75 with the case panel off though, then yes, you absolutely have issues with airflow through the case and you would be wise to configure your case with two front intake fans bringing ambient air into the case, one rear exhaust fan and one top rear exhaust fan, so that you have a low front to top rear corner air path that will allow some cool air to get to the GPU fans while also not being "stolen" from the CPU cooler like it sometimes is if there are middle or front location fans installed in the top of the case. Even three front intake fans with a rear and top rear exhaust is a good configuration.

Your case came with only one preinstalled fan, the rear exhaust, by default. In addition to that, a top rear fan, and two front fans, would be good additions. Since you have already one extra fan, that one SHOULD be installed in the front as an intake, in the bottom front. I'm confused how you could have an AF140 installed when your specifications for your case say you can only install 120mm fans in all locations?
 
Aug 8, 2019
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Where is the AF140 mounted in the case? The front?
It is mounted at the rear blowing out.
Your case came with only one preinstalled fan
I currently only have 1 fan, i dont know if the case came with one as i didnt build it. I will maybe ask the guy who built it.

Also, today i booted the PC just fine, run Dying Light and played for like 3 minutes before it crashed AGAIN. I didnt get a chance to look at the temps when it crahed but previously when i checked upon entering the game it was at 64C. After crashing i touched a metal part that the GPU has, as i have the panel off, and it wasnt as hot as it was yesterday while i was gaming. I have 3 conclusions: 1st is that the manufacturer didnt put enough thermal paste on the GPU. 2nd my airflow is really bad (im willing to buy 3 additional fans) and 3rd the problem is not the GPU but i dont know what it could be. The HDD where the games are installed is fine when downloading and besides, it is not even used most of the times while ingame. I've used up to 10gb RAM, no problem. Maybe a CPU issue? The temps look fine but i dont know...

BTW using HWMonitor I get 3 fans: CPU fan, FANIN2 fan and 4 PWM fans that are all at 0%.
 
Aug 8, 2019
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I'm getting tired of this issue. I have tried EVERYTHING. I just noticed that my CPU was running at 4Ghz, so i went on to underclock it, full of hope that it would work. I disabled Core Performance Boost in the bios and now the CPU was running at 3.5Ghz. Launched the game, and there it goes again. I have underclocked the GPU slightly, the CPU and no XMP is enabled for the RAM. I seriously dont know what is wrong here...
 

Ketchup79

Respectable
There is no use gaming on this right now. The issue is temperature. You need to give it back to the builder and tell him to fix it. When people pay me to build a computer for them, there are expectations, and yours were not met.
 
Aug 8, 2019
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I also tried stressing the ram using Heavy Load, reached 15gbs in use and no crash... Later using Novabench I got a crash after running each test one by one...
The issue is temperature
Yeah the thing is that when it crashes the temp is no more that 75C. The most recent crash was at 63C! I am willing to get 3 new fans (2 front blowing in and 1 at the top blowing out) but i doubt thats the issue.
 

Ketchup79

Respectable
Explain how you know what the max temp was when it crashed, as any temp you see afterward would be significantly lower than the temp that caused the crash.

Also, what temps are you looking at? Just video card?
 
Aug 8, 2019
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Mostly video card because I thought that the CPU was fine. Anyways this is useless, the only real explanation i can give is that some hardware is faulty. Nevertheless, I'll let a proffesional look at it, who knows maybe i've been doing something wrong. Thank you for your time and interest.
 

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