Question Picking Linux version make no sense!

Sep 3, 2019
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OK. I looking at Linux but there must be 1000 version of it!

How anyone supposed to know what is what or what you want? I looking at sites and they have lot of words sayings nothing. My Inglish sucks and I still learning so I have excuse. What theirs?

Inglish their langwage and their words saying nothing! Words go on and on and I thinkings I knowings less than when I startinged! Almost get headake!

Maybe I go with Mint but how anyone know if that really good one?
 

Remeca

Upstanding
Aug 30, 2019
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It can seem overwhelming, but the reason there are so many is because they can be so small and specialized. You probably don't want specialized though, you're looking for a desktop centric distro. In that case, standard Mint Cinnamon is a good choice, or XFCE edition if you're working with dated hardware. I liked Mint most, and I tried dozens. It was my main OS for about 5 years before I got back into PC gaming, before Linux was as supported in that area as it is now.
 
Feb 4, 2019
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To put it basic there are a lot of versions of Linux, but despite many versions they all are built to be able to be used free. Some linux versions have a paid version as well where you can pay to get extra features. What do you want to use linux for and what does it need to be able to do ? Are you looking for a windows type interface or a different type of interphase. Do you want to have it be similar to windows, similar to mac, or just a lightweight version to restore an old computer ?
 
Sep 3, 2019
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I thinkings they have too many version. Sometime in life it nessisary to thin herd for survivul of species.

I thinking I wantings one close to good Windows not 10. It goings on strong computer and run virchually sometimes and experiment see what it like.
 
Mar 19, 2019
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You can start with Debian testing Xfce. If you have new hardware, upgrade it to Debian Sid with the Synaptic program. Install firmware packages for your hardware. Use the dmesg command to see the log file for missing firmware files. Change the user to root with command: su
Install sudo: apt-get install sudo

Then you can type as normal user: sudo dmesg
 
Between Linux Mint, Debian and Ubuntu (with a few variants of each), plus the increasingly popular Manjaro and MX Linux, try them all, and see what YOU like...

(It's hard to find much wrong with Mint, in my opinion...; you could almost forget it even has a terminal)
 
The choice between Debian/Ubuntu/Mint is same as the choice between Pepsi / CocaCola / tap water - a personal choice.

Another think I'd suggest - find a Linux forum in your local language if you have difficulty expressing yourself in English (and believe me, you do pretty well).
 
Sep 3, 2019
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Thank you. I is getting better. Years ago I know zero of it but English langwage is kinda strange. In other langwage things more consistint. This always spelled the same and not so many exceptions.

I thinkinged about it and I edited this. It true. English is not my first language but same thing true in every language:

Sometimes people throwings around 1000 big words trying to make them sound smart. Sometimes those words is "blah blah blah" and not saying anything at all!
 
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