News Pimax's Next-Generation Reality 12K QLED VR Headset Defies Belief

Oct 26, 2021
1
1
10
0
Well, if it lives up to the promises, it will absolutely be worth that price in a year. We'll see if it does, indeed, live up to the promises though, and what kind of horror show it ends up being if you try to do wireless connection. Also, was there a refresh rate? I hope they are doing at least 90 Hz.

Anyway, from what I hear the current Pimax hardware (at the top) is pretty great, but the software isn't exactly plug and play. It seems like they have a bit of work to do software side if they want to make foviated rendering successful in a year (or maybe Steam VR has an upcoming announcement about that and everyone has just done a great job keeping the cat in the bag). Anyway, it could be a very exciting year in VR, if all the rumors and promises pan out.
 
Reactions: salgado18

TJ Hooker

Champion
Ambassador
It's actually MUCH HIGHER than 6k. They also show at the end with the "one more thing" the headset includes a 6000PPI FRD display for the center region of the display. That area is extremely high resolution.
No, what they're calling 12K has only half the number of pixels of what would actually be 12K (although no 12K displays exist yet AFAIK). They're listing the number of sub-pixels (RGB, 3 sub pixels per pixel) rather than pixels for some reason though.

Real 12K should have four times the pixels/sub pixels as 6K. Pixmax "12K" only has double the amount.
 
Last edited:
Reactions: peachpuff

computerguy72

Distinguished
Sep 22, 2011
188
0
18,690
1
No, what they're calling 12K has only half the number of pixels of what would actually be 12K (although no 12K displays exist yet AFAIK). They're listing the number of sub-pixels (RGB, 3 sub pixels per pixel) rather than pixels for some reason though.

Real 12K should have four times the pixels/sub pixels as 6K. Pixmax "12K" only has double the amount.
No, at the end they have a section called "one more thing" where they show the center of the screen is close to 6000ppi and 70ppd using a high resolution projector for the center of the screen. So you are incorrect.
 

TJ Hooker

Champion
Ambassador
No, at the end they have a section called "one more thing" where they show the center of the screen is close to 6000ppi and 70ppd using a high resolution projector for the center of the screen. So you are incorrect.
I don't see any of that in this article, could you provide a link to what you're referring to? Either way, pixel density (PPI/PPD) and pixel count are two different things.

According to Pixmax's own slide (3rd image in this article), their "12K" headset has 120.4M sub pixels. A real 12K display would have 4x the sub pixels of a 6K display, so ~244M.
 

spongiemaster

Estimable
Dec 12, 2019
1,859
930
3,560
0
I don't see any of that in this article, could you provide a link to what you're referring to? Either way, pixel density (PPI/PPD) and pixel count are two different things.

According to Pixmax's own slide (3rd image in this article), their "12K" headset has 120.4M sub pixels. A real 12K display would have 4x the sub pixels of a 6K display, so ~244M.
Don't see what he's talking about either, but it sounds like something akin to Nvidia multi-res shading where items not in your direct line of site are rendered at lower resolutions to improve performance. He's misunderstanding what they are talking about. Two 6k screens side by side do not make a 12k screen. They make 1/2 of one.
 
Reactions: TJ Hooker

computerguy72

Distinguished
Sep 22, 2011
188
0
18,690
1
Don't see what he's talking about either, but it sounds like something akin to Nvidia multi-res shading where items not in your direct line of site are rendered at lower resolutions to improve performance. He's misunderstanding what they are talking about. Two 6k screens side by side do not make a 12k screen. They make 1/2 of one.
Incorrect, look at their Pimax Frontier video at the end. 3rd try here. Last 40 seconds of their video. It has decent explanation of the extra internal projectors resolution.
It seems you are commenting without even watching their provided information. It's at 1:05 and 48 seconds.

Here is the link with the time index:
View: https://youtu.be/sNfEDlAUGU0?t=3948
BTW Even your comment about resolution is not right. They say it has 4 6k screens not two.
 

spongiemaster

Estimable
Dec 12, 2019
1,859
930
3,560
0
Incorrect, look at their Pimax Frontier video at the end. 3rd try here. Last 40 seconds of their video. It has decent explanation of the extra internal projectors resolution.
It seems you are commenting without even watching their provided information. It's at 1:05 and 48 seconds.

Here is the link with the time index:
View: https://youtu.be/sNfEDlAUGU0?t=3948
BTW Even your comment about resolution is not right. They say it has 4 6k screens not two.
Just no. You're confusing resolution with pixel density. The lens on the new "12k" head set have higher pixel density (pixels per degree for VR) at the center. This is an independent attribute vs resolution. The resolution for each lense is 6k, 5620x2720 (which isn't even really 6k, but 5.7k, the only 6k video standard is 6144x3160). Those two combined have less than half the pixels of a true 12k display. Every single previous Pimax VR headset has been deceivingly named the same way. If you look at either of their 8k headsets on their website:

Pimax Vision 8K X - | VR Headset | Virtual Reality Equipment

You will find this:

Resolution3840 * 2160 * 2

3840 * 2160 * 2 = 16,588,800 pixels
Actual 8k is 7680x4320 = 33,177,600 pixels which is twice as many pixels compared to the Pimax 8k units.
 

computerguy72

Distinguished
Sep 22, 2011
188
0
18,690
1
Actual 8k is 7680x4320
Wow you are always wrong. Like a 0% hit rate.

Here is the actual SMPTE ST 2036–1 standard for 8K Resolution: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8K_resolution
Scroll down to the list. You will note the exact resolution used in the 8KX IS indeed listed and indeed defined as 8K according to the official standard.
I guess you can make up your own standards in fantasyland as you have shown. You lose.
 

TJ Hooker

Champion
Ambassador
Wow you are always wrong. Like a 0% hit rate.

Here is the actual SMPTE ST 2036–1 standard for 8K Resolution: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8K_resolution
Scroll down to the list. You will note the exact resolution used in the 8KX IS indeed listed and indeed defined as 8K according to the official standard.
I guess you can make up your own standards in fantasyland as you have shown. You lose.
That table with a list of "8K" resolutions has nothing to do with the SMPTE standard, it's just a list of examples of resolutions that are ~8000 pixels across in the horizontal axis. SMPTE ST 2036-1 defines 8K UHDTV (also referred to as UHDTV2) as 7680 x 4320, full stop.
https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/stamp/stamp.jsp?tp=&arnumber=7395479
SMPTE ST 2036-1, Ultra High Definition Television — Image Parameter Values for Program Production
Defines a family of progressive image sample structures [...] 7680 x 4320 (UHDTV2) which has a hierarchical
relationship with 1920 x 1080 and an aspect ratio of 16:9.
https://www.smpte.org/blog/broadcasting-8k
An 8K UHD TV has a display resolution of 7680x4320 [...] This standard is defined in SMPTE ST 2036-1, and it contains four times the pixels of a 4K resolution.
 
Last edited:

ASK THE COMMUNITY