[SOLVED] Power draw question in regards to single 8-pin on RTX 3070 Founders Edition ?

  • Thread starter Deleted member 362816
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Deleted member 362816

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I am looking for actual factual information here not a discussion about "what ifs". That being said let me elaborate on my question.

RTX 3070 Founder ED. With the proprietary adaptor in the box effectively you are running this card off of 1x 8 pin pci-e connection (theoretically 150 watt) then you are pulling (75 watt theoretically of the pci-e slot) Total 225 watt.

Pretty common place not considering power spikes that these cards can pull from 225-245 watts under full load, higher end is reached when power limit in software is increased 10%, That being said aren't we pulling more wattage then the connections and provide ?

Well I know that is not the case, Even with piggy pack pci-e cable common on many power supplies Jonny Guru tested that a single 8 pin (cable) can give up to 300 watts, not that this is the best case scenario by any means. (you run into more of an amp issue at this point then anything else) (single rail and quality cables should avoid this theoretically)

So the question of the day is this, Assuming that these cards only come with 1x12-pin to 8-pin cable, are the cards able to pull 300 watts off one cable or is it best if you are pushing the card to upgrade to a 12-pin to 2x 8 pin Y splitter?

I appreciate in information on this matter as I am beyond curious.

With heavily modified kingpin cards that I have used with LN2, we always use these Y adaptors to plug more connectors to achieve more power(hard mods). But I don't know if that will translate to the Nvidia FE cards.
 

Eximo

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I believe they are rating the standard at 600W, but 16 gauge with 6 wires, should be like 800W before it would start getting too warm. Two 8-pins would also be six 12V wires.

Actual rating would come down to how well they do the connectors. Crimping or soldering.

It certainly looks nicer.
 

Eximo

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As you mentioned, typical PSU cables can handle a lot more current than the 'rating' they are given. Particularly lower gauge wiring found on PSUs with daisy chained connectors on a single cable.

Distributing the load will result in slightly less internal heating of the wire and a slightly higher voltage (More wires = less resistance = less heating. less voltage drop) That could translate to a boost bin here or there. Power spikes are just that, temporary, so the average wattage/current through the wire doesn't really change all that much.

You are going to be limited by the card's inputs and sensors regardless, unless modified. 220W card overclocked is going to pull more, but nothing crazy compared to the wiring.
 
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Deleted member 362816

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As you mentioned, typical PSU cables can handle a lot more current than the 'rating' they are given. Particularly lower gauge wiring found on PSUs with daisy chained connectors on a single cable.

Distributing the load will result in slightly less internal heating of the wire and a slightly higher voltage (More wires = less resistance = less heating. less voltage drop) That could translate to a boost bin here or there. Power spikes are just that, temporary, so the average wattage/current through the wire doesn't really change all that much.

You are going to be limited by the card's inputs and sensors regardless, unless modified. 220W card overclocked is going to pull more, but nothing crazy compared to the wiring.
Thank you for your reply. Thoughts on what the 12pin to 8pin FE converter can handle for wattage though? any reason to upgrade to this? Or purely pointless?

 

Eximo

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I believe they are rating the standard at 600W, but 16 gauge with 6 wires, should be like 800W before it would start getting too warm. Two 8-pins would also be six 12V wires.

Actual rating would come down to how well they do the connectors. Crimping or soldering.

It certainly looks nicer.
 

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