Question Psu exploded, repair or replace?

May 31, 2020
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Hello, I'm wondering if people with some experience in this subject would give their opinion, I was playing call of duty warzone (which can be stressing on the pc), when my psu sort of exploded, my ups and the circuit breaker also went down. It's a 6 year old psu, supposedly good quality xfx pro750w XPS-750W-BEF gold 80+, my question is: worth repairing or better to replace? Some friends say it's too old to repair and it might break down again.
 
Even the best of parts can fail.
I doubt that your unit can be repaired at any reasonable cost.
And, what will you do in the mean time?
Buy a modern replacement, regardless.
If, by chance your unit is still under warranty, send it in for RMA and sell the replaced unit unopened.
 
Reactions: Gil84

NightHawkRMX

Illustrious
A solid 550w would work fine. Unfortunately, PSUs are in shortage right now. Usually out of stock or have inflated prices.

Best buy has a Corsair CX650M for $95. Nothing special but it will work reliably for your system.
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/corsair-cx-m-series-650w-atx12v-2-4-eps12v-2-92-80-plus-bronze-modular-power-supply-matte-black/5845214.p?acampID=633495&cmp=RMX&loc=VbeQikWV1xyOUpAxTSQPxVT4Uki1qzyxRXDUX40&ref=198&refdomain=pcpartpicker.com&skuId=5845214
Or a Antec Neo Eco Gold Zen 500w for same price.
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/zphmP6/antec-neoeco-gold-zen-500-w-80-gold-certified-atx-power-supply-ne500g-zen
 
Reactions: mctrader07
May 31, 2020
9
0
10
0
A solid 550w would work fine. Unfortunately, PSUs are in shortage right now. Usually out of stock or have inflated prices.

Best buy has a Corsair CX650M for $95. Nothing special but it will work reliably for your system.
https://www.bestbuy.com/site/corsair-cx-m-series-650w-atx12v-2-4-eps12v-2-92-80-plus-bronze-modular-power-supply-matte-black/5845214.p?acampID=633495&cmp=RMX&loc=VbeQikWV1xyOUpAxTSQPxVT4Uki1qzyxRXDUX40&ref=198&refdomain=pcpartpicker.com&skuId=5845214
Or a Antec Neo Eco Gold Zen 500w for same price.
https://pcpartpicker.com/product/zphmP6/antec-neoeco-gold-zen-500-w-80-gold-certified-atx-power-supply-ne500g-zen
Thanks! I will check prices in my country :)
 

InvalidError

Titan
Moderator
Replace it. Power supplies are not user repairable.
I have repaired dozens over the years, including those in three of my PCs, two monitors, two external HDD enclosures and two TVs. How repairable it is depends on what exploded. If the PCB got charred or components got destroyed beyond recognition making it impossible to replace like-for-like with correct values and orientation where applicable, then yes, that would definitely be a forgetaboutit case.

Unless you are skilled and knowledgeable enough to do the repair yourself though, the repair will likely end up being more expensive than buying a new PSU assuming it is fixable in the first place.

Since every "exploded" PSU I ever got was a primary-side failure where one or more FET/BJT pin got vaporized along with a bunch of nearby support components caught in the plasma ball, the PSU likely belongs in the e-waste bin.
 
How repairable it is depends on what exploded. If the PCB got charred or components got destroyed beyond recognition making it impossible to replace like-for-like with correct values and orientation where applicable, then yes, that would definitely be a forgetaboutit case.

Unless you are skilled and knowledgeable enough to do the repair yourself though, the repair will likely end up being more expensive than buying a new PSU assuming it is fixable in the first place.
This.

So many times I'll see someone "replace the fuse" only to have the fuse blow as soon as they power it on after replacing it. Or replace a burnt inductor, only to find the new inductor also burns up.

It's not unusual for it to take me a couple days to get down to a root cause of a failure (we have to do it for QC reasons to make sure there isn't a design flaw) because it's almost never as simple as "this MOSFET blew up... replace the MOSFET."
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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It's not unusual for it to take me a couple days to get down to a root cause of a failure (we have to do it for QC reasons to make sure there isn't a design flaw) because it's almost never as simple as "this MOSFET blew up... replace the MOSFET."
Just like broken code:

"This is broken, how long will it take to fix?"
{me} 5 minutes, once I find the problem.
"How long will it take to find the problem?"
{me} ¯\(ツ)
 

Karadjgne

Titan
Ambassador
First : figure out what to look for.
Second : figure out where to look for it.
Third : figure out why you looked for it.
Forth+ : see First, rinse and repeat as often as necessary.

And now you know why shops charge per hour, or any part thereof.

Psu is toast. Dead. Done for. Gone. That's not the question. Questions are 'Is it still under manufacturer warranty' and 'Is it worth the hassle or better to simply buy a new one'
 

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