News Quantum Computing on a Chip: Brace for the Revolution

Jul 12, 2021
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I sincerely doubt the claim that they have qubits (plural) on a wafer. The linked article talks mostly about an OS running on traditional (non-quantum) processors that could interface with (theoretical?) chip-scale qubit wafers.

If someone developed a qubit that takes less than a freezer of space to "run" (let alone do anything other than generate random numbers) that would be big breaking news all over the internet.
 
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Eximo

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Yes, the article does a good job of avoiding it, but they are basically saying they have made a standard chip with circuitry designed for connecting to quantum processors. It doesn't do any quantum computing or host any qubits.

"proximally co-located and integrated with qubit chips in a cryo-cooled environment to drastically reduce the complexity of input/output connections and maximize the benefits of fast, precise, low-noise digital control and readout, and energy-efficient classical co-processing.”

So the actual quantum computer still requires a cabinet sized cooling system.
 
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It both can and can't run crysis. your cat may also be both alive and dead if you get one of these.
No it both can't and also can't run it and no quantum CPU will ever be able to run any games without any traditional cores, it's a completely different sort of calculations.
Quantum computing will be huge for simulating different things, the human brain among them, but it won't do much of the things that normal people need.
In the far future it will probably end up just like physX as a coCPU in a GPU to simulate complex systems like hair or leaves on trees or weather or enemy AI.
 
Jul 13, 2021
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I make no claims for being a clever scientific person, but I have read so many times in my life time, scientific statements that say we will never be able to do something. Now 30-50 years later we are all doing those things. Think back to the possibility of a computer in any form being used within the home, when was that first even considered a possibility, not something that cannot be done?

It was only during the 2nd World War that it was deemed possible by scientists for a computer to be housed in a very big property, a computer which as we know now was far less powerful than compare to a mobile phone today. Those same technical wizards were far from thinking we could all have one on our table tops in the 1980's, or one on our wrists in the 1990’s! (I still own an old Seiko computer watch from 1984)

So, while quantum processors cannot do PC/Turing functions as we speak, we cannot rule it out, we cannot say it cannot happen.
If I was able to live long enough to collect the winnings, I would eagerly wager a few thousand pounds today at say 1,000,000 to 1 that quantum processors will be able to 'play Crysis' (or simulate a powerful PC computer and graphics card environment) within the next 40 years. We are only at the very beginning still in terms of understanding and using quantum processing, let’s look forward to the near future when it becomes normal for everyone to have access to, and use, Quantum processing in everyday life (Some of us playing old PC games on handheld quantum devices!).
 

Eximo

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The primary goal is quantum cryptology, I suspect the first consumer grade hardware is just going to be for secure communications, not calculating anything in particular. And the quantum internet, in part, is probably going to happen before that. No need to encrypt streaming services and other content, but VPNs, email, and other more worthwhile things. HTTPQ or something like that at some point.
 

LolaGT

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Oct 31, 2020
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There isn't a quantum revolution coming for any of us in a significant way(that the typical human will notice) any time soon.
And there certainly isn't going to be a terminal hooked in to a quantum mainframe in the next couple three decades for cubicle monkeys, let alone a home consumer of any kind.
Decades.
We will figure out how to achieve continuous fusion first, most likely, almost limitless cheap energy is going to be a lot more significant. Then we won't worry as much about powering more powerful traditional computers as cooling them will be orders of magnitude less expensive
And still, unfortunately, those of us here today probably won't be around when it is a thing.
 
Jul 14, 2021
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What is today's early price range of toy (<256) qubit processing chips?
I mean, a lot could be tried out and done or learnt on chips with Turing tapes limited to 4, 8 or 16 bits already.
Likewise later serious qubit vectors processing units could benefit from early toy qubit adopters.
 

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