[SOLVED] RAM upgrade for Asus Crosshair Hero VIII & Ryzen 5900X (from 3200mhz to 3600mhz) ?

orodruin

Honorable
Jan 23, 2019
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10,535
Hello everyone.
I have a Ryzen 5900x processor on an Asus Crosshair Hero VIII motherboard.
I was using G.Skill Trident Z 32GB (2X16GB) 3200Mhz DDR4 (F4-3200C16D-32GTZR) RAM kit in this system.

I replaced my rams with GSkill Trident Z Neo RGB 32GB (2x16GB) 3600MHz DDR4 (F4-3600C16D-32GTZNC) model
to get a little more performance in programs and games such as Autocad, Solid, Photoshop, Lightroom.

What I want to ask is:
Have I made the right choice by switching to this memory?
Because there are also 4000mhz kits. But some users say they are having problems at 4000 mhz.

They say the best is 3600mhz as the ratio ratio is 1:1.
Also, as far as I know, ryzen processors give the best performance with 4 sticks of single-sided or 2 sticks of double-sided ram.
If I add another 2x16gb 3600 mhz ram in the future, will this performance deteriorate?

I would be glad if you help.
 
Solution
You're fine as is. You need to understand that there's a point where you end up spending more money on parts/upgrades but you don't get a net return. Adding more ram to the other slots will add stress to the memory controller but you're not maxing it out, in short, for what you do, more ram won't hurt but please keep in mind to pick the exact same ram kit as the one you own at the moment of writing.

If you didn't notice, for your work, you need stability not the highest performance that can be overclocked out of the platform, overclocking introduces a degree of instability, which needs fine tuning(over time and benchmarking), something that a workstation shouldn't be doing during it's useful/productive lifecycle.

Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
You're fine as is. You need to understand that there's a point where you end up spending more money on parts/upgrades but you don't get a net return. Adding more ram to the other slots will add stress to the memory controller but you're not maxing it out, in short, for what you do, more ram won't hurt but please keep in mind to pick the exact same ram kit as the one you own at the moment of writing.

If you didn't notice, for your work, you need stability not the highest performance that can be overclocked out of the platform, overclocking introduces a degree of instability, which needs fine tuning(over time and benchmarking), something that a workstation shouldn't be doing during it's useful/productive lifecycle.
 
Solution

orodruin

Honorable
Jan 23, 2019
46
4
10,535
You're fine as is. You need to understand that there's a point where you end up spending more money on parts/upgrades but you don't get a net return. Adding more ram to the other slots will add stress to the memory controller but you're not maxing it out, in short, for what you do, more ram won't hurt but please keep in mind to pick the exact same ram kit as the one you own at the moment of writing.

If you didn't notice, for your work, you need stability not the highest performance that can be overclocked out of the platform, overclocking introduces a degree of instability, which needs fine tuning(over time and benchmarking), something that a workstation shouldn't be doing during it's useful/productive lifecycle.

I don't overclock the memory. I just open XMP. I don't give extra voltage. Stability is what matters to me.

There is something I want to ask here, if I update my memory to 64gb in the future, that is, if I make 4x16gb, there will be no decrease in performance, right?
Because some of the files I'm working with are big in size. I may need to do an upgrade in the future. If I buy another kit from the same memory, I guess it will be okay.

My reason for switching to 3600mhz was to gain a little more speed and to make the processor's memory ratio ratio as AMD suggested.
 
May 15, 2022
2
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i know you said this is a question relating to the 5900x, i currently run a 4400mhz pny xlr8 32gb kit on a 5950x downclocked to 3933 cl14 pny tech support has been really helpful i just asked if i could get the batch min/max of their 4400 4000 3800 3600 kits and pulled them alongside each other in the hex table to see what the max of each setpoint per grouping. ive ran memtest and zero errors. I even tried their unofficial bypass for the 2000fclk and it kinda works but it wont run 1:1:1 you just have to let it run auto but it will run a max at least on my aorus master b550 @ 4166. but for me at least the 3933 cl14 is extremely stable. the 4400 timings and the 3933 timings despite being huge gap in ns. are actually about the same the only difference being that at 4166 it will throw a whea error if i run blender.

i tried using ryzen dram calculator as a basis but it wont let me run anything over 3800. but it still gave me a good base to start with, that and the information from thaiphoon. if you understand how to adjust the the timings in hex its much easier to to find the errors without having to boot up. there is a function (dunno if its cuz i have the pro or enterprise version) that allows you simulate tests that you have temporarily set within the editor. then using the audit function it will show you the major errors and with just trial and error you ll figure out the base numbers of timing. im not sure tho about the 5900x but id assume since it runs nearly parallel to a lot of the benchmarks as 5950x it should be scalable in a way to the way the ram works with the 5950x. the main points is just remember some boards have an automatic offset (it took me weeks of scowering the interwebs to figure out what the difference between auto, normal and offset for soc on the b550 aorus master. but once i figured that out .. its actually in the manual but its worded in such a way that i didnt even understand what the <Mod Edit> it was talking about lol.

the sweet spot tho is 3733 if you can get a smooth kit or if you want the best out of box teamgroup xtreem 3600mhz cl14 kit is sweet. but a little too deep for my pockets with the 16gb kit running around 250usd. and the match 32gb at like 500+. i didnt mean to hijack your thread but i just wanted to give some incite. for me at least stability will always come first over extremely fast. but between 3600-3733 is the sweetspot for most 5900-5950x.

32gb is more than enough if youre not doing much rendering or enterprise work related projects. but when you do start using enterprise software reliability starts to play a factor and lower mhz with faster timings will benefit more. and you ll eventually need more ram or just grab a workstation gpu with 32gb i think thats what the current wx6800 has or if youre pockets are really deep the a8000 with 64gb,...hah.. anyways you should be more than fine because right now i dont thnk there are very many games that even push the 16gb limit
 
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mamasan2000

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They say the best is 3600mhz as the ratio ratio is 1:1.
Also, as far as I know, ryzen processors give the best performance with 4 sticks of single-sided or 2 sticks of double-sided ram.
If I add another 2x16gb 3600 mhz ram in the future, will this performance deteriorate?

Not necessarily true, singlesided vs doublesided. https://cybersided.com/double-sided-vs-single-sided-ram/
You are thinking of single rank vs dual rank. 4 single ranks stick or 2 dual rank sticks works best. If you add more dual rank sticks, you might have to drop RAM clocks because the memory controller can't handle the speed. Where exactly that is, I can't say. What I've read and heard from overclockers is, don't expect 4000 Mhz from 4 dual rank sticks. Maybe 3600 Mhz, at best. It should depend on your IMC quality too. And that is a lottery. The more expensive CPUs don't automatically have a better IMC than the cheaper CPUs.
Mclk, Fclk and Uclk should definitely be kept 1:1:1.
 
Not necessarily true, singlesided vs doublesided. https://cybersided.com/double-sided-vs-single-sided-ram/
You are thinking of single rank vs dual rank. 4 single ranks stick or 2 dual rank sticks works best. If you add more dual rank sticks, you might have to drop RAM clocks because the memory controller can't handle the speed. Where exactly that is, I can't say. What I've read and heard from overclockers is, don't expect 4000 Mhz from 4 dual rank sticks. Maybe 3600 Mhz, at best. It should depend on your IMC quality too. And that is a lottery. The more expensive CPUs don't automatically have a better IMC than the cheaper CPUs.
Mclk, Fclk and Uclk should definitely be kept 1:1:1.
Exactly, getting good timings and tweak it yourself based on knowledge on ICs on ddr4, is sometimes better than buying better expensive ram.

the only thing that going to reduce latency is the CCD to CCD, while CCX core to core operation remains untroubled with slower ram.

but yes, getting between 3600~3933 at good timings is a challange, 3866 mostly would succeed with good timings.