Question Removed GPU and installed new SSD and now computer won't turn on

Jun 18, 2020
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I built myself a new computer and moved over my hard drives and gpu. I wanted to give my parents my old rig, so I purchased an SSD and hooked that up. However, when I press the power button, the fans turn on for a split second before turning off. I do not make it to the BIOS screen.

Things I've done to diagnose/troubleshoot:
So far I've reseated all connections and ram, verified that the psu isn't faulty by using a different psu, and reset CMOS via jumper (I also removed the CMOS battery, turned on PC, and problem persisted). I also cleaned out my CPU fan and reapplied thermal paste.

I didn't purchase a gpu as my parents would get by with the Intel integrated graphics. The computer was working yesterday before I moved over the parts, so not sure why removing the GPU and installing a new SSD would cause this much issue. Is there another motherboard reset I am unaware of? There seems to be a short somewhere, but I've exhausted all the options i've come across on the web.

PCPartpicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/nhhhwh
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
So the ONLY thing you did differently was to remove the graphics card and install the new SSD?

Where did you purchase the SSD from? Will the system POST and allow you to enter the BIOS if you REMOVE the SSD completely by disconnecting both the power and SATA cables from the drive?

Have you tried a hard reset? The problem might be that the BIOS thinks there is supposed to be a PCIe based graphics card installed and is not looking for an integrated graphics adapter because it is disabled in the BIOS setup program settings. While it's unlikely because USUALLY the BIOS will automatically reconfigure itself if that is the only adapter present, we have seen this happen before. It's worth a try.

If that doesn't work, and if disconnecting the SSD doesn't work, then something else is (obviously) going on and we'll need to know for certain whether you did anything else while working on this such as removed the CPU, changed memory, etc.

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes, press the power button on the case for 30 seconds. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
 
Jun 18, 2020
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I followed the BIO hard reset instructions, but PC still not posting. I also removed the SSD via power and SATA cables, but still not posting.

The only things I did were remove the GPU and hard drives (I moved my boot drive to my new PC) and installed a new 1 TB Crucial MX500 SSD bought new from Newegg.

I did not remove the CPU, change ram, or add/remove/any other parts.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I'd remove the CPU cooler again, remove the CPU, check the motherboard for bent pins closely, then try to power on with no CPU installed. Of course, it's not going to start. Then reinstall the CPU, carefully, so as not to bend any pins. It's possible that there ARE bent pins, which is why I recommend looking closely, and you just never knew it because it could be a pin that handles the integrated graphics and you've been using a discreet graphics card all along and never knew.

Next, remove the memory, and try to start the system. Again, it won't start, but the purpose of this is to force the BIOS to reconfigure as you put each item back. So power off between removing the CPU and trying to start, same with the memory, just to be clear.

Put the memory back and now try to start again. Be sure that you are installing the memory in the A2 slot, which is the second slot over from the CPU.

If it still fails to try to POST, then I'd recommend removing the motherboard from the case and bench test. If nothing else comes to light, then as unusual as it may seem it's probably a bad motherboard. Just to be sure though, make sure that while bench testing you are triggering the motherboard on using the pwr pins and shorting them together with a screwdriver, carefully so as to not touch OTHER pins, so that you can eliminate the front panel and case connections as a source of trouble because they will be disconnected.

The guide below will give you step by step instructions on how to bench test.

 
Jun 18, 2020
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Did you change PSU?
Did you use modular cables from a different psu with new one?

Note - using modular cables from a different psu can damage your pc hardware.
No, same PSU and modular cables stayed the same. I bought a new PSU that arrived today and I tried using that ( i changed all cables as well), but problems persisted. I was hoping it was a defective PSU, but it's not.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Did you change PSU?
Did you use modular cables from a different psu with new one?

Note - using modular cables from a different psu can damage your pc hardware.
Yes, this is an important note and point. If you tried a different PSU but used the same cables, then the chances are good that something is toast now, even if it wasn't before, unless both PSUs were the same brand AND had the same pinout, which isn't always the case even when dealing with two power supplies from the same company.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Make sure that in all of this, the fan connector for the CPU cooler has not come unplugged and is still correctly plugged into the CPU_FAN header. Many systems will immediately shut down if an RPM signal from the fan is not detected. Might even try plugging a different fan into the CPU_FAN header just to see if it still shuts down. It's possible the cooler fan is failing on the RPM signal circuit. Long shot, but we're getting to the point where long shots might start becoming the more likely reasons.
 
Jun 18, 2020
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Make sure that in all of this, the fan connector for the CPU cooler has not come unplugged and is still correctly plugged into the CPU_FAN header. Many systems will immediately shut down if an RPM signal from the fan is not detected. Might even try plugging a different fan into the CPU_FAN header just to see if it still shuts down. It's possible the cooler fan is failing on the RPM signal circuit. Long shot, but we're getting to the point where long shots might start becoming the more likely reasons.
I tried your recommendation of removing the CPU cooler and CPU. I saw no bent pins. Same thing with the ram and CPU-FAN header. Tried your recommendations, but no luck.

I think next option is removing the motherboard and trying the bench test.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
I agree. Just to be certain, you did completely power off the system and either flip the switch on the back of the power supply off or unplug it from the wall, before you removed the graphics card or made any other changes, right? It won't necessarily cause problems if you don't do that, but is a good idea to do it anyhow. Otherwise there is still power connected to the motherboard and other components, even if they are not active.
 
Jun 18, 2020
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I agree. Just to be certain, you did completely power off the system and either flip the switch on the back of the power supply off or unplug it from the wall, before you removed the graphics card or made any other changes, right? It won't necessarily cause problems if you don't do that, but is a good idea to do it anyhow. Otherwise there is still power connected to the motherboard and other components, even if they are not active.
So I believe it's my CPU or CPU socket. I took my cpu out and tried powering on the PC and the fans stayed on (first time that's happened after trying everything else you recommended). When I place the CPU back into the socket and turn on the PC, it doesn't turn on. Fans turn for a split second and then nothing. Any idea if this indicates a CPU or motherboard problem? I looked closely at the socket and saw no bent pins ( View: https://imgur.com/a/nUj0bGE
)
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
With the CPU installed but no CPU fan installed, there is no RPM signal from the cooler and many motherboards will simply shut off after determining there is no RPM signal and therefore no cooler. Try connecting a four pin PWM fan to the CPU_FAN header and see if it still shuts off right away. If it doesn't, do it yourself, because you do not want to leave it running for more than maybe five or ten seconds with no heatsink installed.
 
Jun 18, 2020
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With the CPU installed but no CPU fan installed, there is no RPM signal from the cooler and many motherboards will simply shut off after determining there is no RPM signal and therefore no cooler. Try connecting a four pin PWM fan to the CPU_FAN header and see if it still shuts off right away. If it doesn't, do it yourself, because you do not want to leave it running for more than maybe five or ten seconds with no heatsink installed.
No CPU w/ 4-pin PWM fan connected to CPU_FAN = computer turns on and stays on
No CPU w/nothing connected to CPU-FAN = computer turns on and stays on
CPU installed w/4-pin PWM fan connected to CPU_FAN = computer does not turn on
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Ok. So I don't honestly know on this one. I don't think anybody could tell you without having either a spare CPU or motherboard to swap in. It might be worth taking it to a local repair shop and tell them you just need the CPU tested in a known good board or a known good CPU tested in this board, to determine which is faulty so you can know for sure without having to actually buy something first, unless you have or know somebody with spare parts.

Otherwise, given the age of the board, I'd be inclined to believe it's the board. Boards just fail, for no apparent reason, sometimes. They wear out. It's common.

CPUs don't usually just fail for no reason, especially not when they are not unlocked and overclocked models that might be prone to electromigration. Then, they can definitely have an increased risk of premature failure. Otherwise, I have CPUs from the early 90's that still work fine when installed in a good board. Unfortunately, motherboards tend to experience a high rate of failure on lower end, and sometimes even top shelf boards, anywhere from five to seven years in a lot of cases because the capacitors just fail.

Short of buying a replacement motherboard, and that's a hard sell given the age of the platform and the cost of replacement 4th Gen chipset motherboards, or any older motherboard really.

Might be best to simply go with a whole new board, CPU and memory for the folks, which could be done fairly cheaply. Probably not much more than a NOS (New old stock) B85, H97 or Z97 board would cost. Any used board that is compatible is probably somewhere between halfway to just about done too and may not be worth spending the money on when you can get a whole new platform that's better than what you have now for now much more than the cost of an old board alone.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 3 3200G 3.6 GHz Quad-Core Processor ($87.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI A320M-A PRO MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($63.29 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($41.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $193.27
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-18 23:09 EDT-0400
 
Jun 18, 2020
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Ok. So I don't honestly know on this one. I don't think anybody could tell you without having either a spare CPU or motherboard to swap in. It might be worth taking it to a local repair shop and tell them you just need the CPU tested in a known good board or a known good CPU tested in this board, to determine which is faulty so you can know for sure without having to actually buy something first, unless you have or know somebody with spare parts.

Otherwise, given the age of the board, I'd be inclined to believe it's the board. Boards just fail, for no apparent reason, sometimes. They wear out. It's common.

CPUs don't usually just fail for no reason, especially not when they are not unlocked and overclocked models that might be prone to electromigration. Then, they can definitely have an increased risk of premature failure. Otherwise, I have CPUs from the early 90's that still work fine when installed in a good board. Unfortunately, motherboards tend to experience a high rate of failure on lower end, and sometimes even top shelf boards, anywhere from five to seven years in a lot of cases because the capacitors just fail.

Short of buying a replacement motherboard, and that's a hard sell given the age of the platform and the cost of replacement 4th Gen chipset motherboards, or any older motherboard really.

Might be best to simply go with a whole new board, CPU and memory for the folks, which could be done fairly cheaply. Probably not much more than a NOS (New old stock) B85, H97 or Z97 board would cost. Any used board that is compatible is probably somewhere between halfway to just about done too and may not be worth spending the money on when you can get a whole new platform that's better than what you have now for now much more than the cost of an old board alone.

PCPartPicker Part List

CPU: AMD Ryzen 3 3200G 3.6 GHz Quad-Core Processor ($87.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: MSI A320M-A PRO MAX Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($63.29 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 8 GB (2 x 4 GB) DDR4-3200 CL16 Memory ($41.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $193.27
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-06-18 23:09 EDT-0400
Thanks for all the help. I was thinking about purchasing new parts last night and given your suggestions, I think I may go that way. It's not a bad investment. Curious...if I install those parts and the problem persists, it would have to be the case front panel connectors, correct? That was my last thought, but wasn't sure if it was feasible.
 

Darkbreeze

Titan
Moderator
Jun 18, 2020
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I'd eliminate the case front panel connections BEFORE doing something else, and you can, easily. Just disconnect them ALL and jump the pwr pins by touching them together with a flat tipped screwdriver or other metal object, being careful to not also touch any of the other pins. This is generally how bench testing is done.

https://www.gamersnexus.net/guides/2011-jumping-a-motherboard-without-power-switch-button
I performed that test and once again, the fans start for a split second before turning off. So I can safely assume that the case front panel connections are working and I do not need a new case. I will purchase your recommended CPU, motherboard, and ram and let you know if it works. Thanks again for your patience and help!
 

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