Question RX 570 no signal/blue flickers/random color crashes/artifacts

sunsetwatermelon

Commendable
Jul 3, 2019
9
0
1,510
0
Hello. I am new to the forum.

I've been having an issue with my graphics card for a long time. I bought my PC around end of 2018. The GPU worked for several months before it started crashing (the screen would be any random color at a time). Then I would just restart a couple of times and it'd work, but not for long. Then I played a game with normal/slightly high setting (it was The Witcher 3) and it had artifacts on my screen, so I stopped playing that game. Other games worked okay so a while, maybe a few months. Eventually when I start my PC, there would be nothing on my screen, just black and it says no signal. I tried again today by connecting the GPU, it stayed on for like 5 minutes until it crashed into a flickering blue screen (no bsod message). Upon hard restarting Windows would start scanning and repairing my :C drive for unknown reason. So I would say it worked for a bit until it just started dying.

I've also sent this graphics card for an RMA (through the seller I bought it from..), but nothing really changed. I still get crashes, and now I can't even use it at all. At this moment I am using the same computer but since I am using an AMD processor (AMD Ryzen 2200G), I can use the integrated graphics (Vega 8). The RX 570 graphic card is not connected to power or anything (it's just there in the slot..). I am also using the same HDMI cable, and it has no issues when connected to mobo GPU, so it's not the cable.

I have done various of fixes before;
  1. DDU'd my graphics driver
  2. Checked my Radeon settings, upping and lowering some values. (I do not go overboard), and it's been a while so I forgot the details.
  3. Sped up the fans. (In case it's overheating).
  4. Checked my UEFI and changed some settings there (I forgot about that too).
There are two slots for the GPU, but since the motherboard is already fixed to the case it is a bit tedious to gain access to that slot as it is blocked by the PSU as well, also I am not sure if that is really the issue, I may have to disconnect and reconnect a lot of cables just to access that so I haven't done that.

The temps when it worked back then wasn't so bad, it was around 85 celcius (during gaming, not normal load), and sometimes it'd worked the whole time I was playing for hours, but the next time I continue it would give in (crashing, etc.).

I also just want to confirm if it's REALLY my graphics card or is it my PSU that fails to give the power it needs? I got a budget not-so-popular PSU and from what I have read, testing the efficiency of a PSU seems difficult, so I need guidance. If it's really about my GPU, I will be buying a new one to replace this one. But before anything, I want to confirm if it's just my GPU and not my PSU.

I will leave the specs below, so I hope anyone can help me out and give me an advice.

Motherboard: ASRock B450M Steel Legend
Ram: 16 GB (8+8) Kingston HyperX Fury 8GB DDR4 2666 MHz CL16 Gaming RAM
SSD/HDD: ADATA XPG SX8200 PRO 256GB NVMe PCIe3x4 + 1TB WD BLUE HDD
GPU: MSI RX 570 4GB Armor (right now I'm just using the Vega 8 as I am typing).
PSU: Gamidias E1 RGB 550W 80+ Certified
Chassis: Segotep Prime-L RGB
OS: Windows 10 Home 21H1
BIOS Ver.: L2.13A

I really need help, looking forward to responses, thank you guys.
 

LazerTechX

Distinguished
May 3, 2014
158
12
18,715
15
85 C seems a lot for long continuous gaming sessions, below 70 would be ideal, mid 70s would be fine IMO. But your symptoms are really like how my friend had with his GTX 1050 TI, it was due to a cheap power supply and it died after 2 years of heavy use. It only averaged around 72C but that cheap unit killed it. The power supply you have seems to only have around 400 watts? i think on the single 12V rail so its not really a 550W unit. I've used a Gamdias E1 RGB 500W on a client build but only for integrated graphics.
 
Reactions: sunsetwatermelon

sunsetwatermelon

Commendable
Jul 3, 2019
9
0
1,510
0
I'd want to rule out the PSU first; it's a junky model, a cheaply-made group-regulated one that isn't even really a 550W by any post-2000 reckoning from a company known for selling junky overrated parts, mostly to people living on the Iberian peninsula.
Thanks a lot for the reply. I've done some Googling and found a PSU by the same company that are selling on Amazon, and oh dear there are so many critical reviews about how their PSU started dying. I have suspected it is my PSU, but if that's the case how do I really confirm? Is my GPU still salvageable if I buy a new PSU? If I were to send the GPU to a repair shop and fit it into another PC would it still work? The GPU would still be usable as of yesterday for like 5 minutes until it gave in.

85 C seems a lot for long continuous gaming sessions, below 70 would be ideal, mid 70s would be fine IMO. But your symptoms are really like how my friend had with his GTX 1050 TI, it was due to a cheap power supply and it died after 2 years of heavy use. It only averaged around 72C but that cheap unit killed it. The power supply you have seems to only have around 400 watts? i think on the single 12V rail so its not really a 550W unit. I've used a Gamdias E1 RGB 500W on a client build but only for integrated graphics.
Hi, thanks a lot for your reply and insight. I am now suspecting my PSU since I realize one of the back fans in my case aren't spinning as fast as it should either, (surprisingly the front fans spins normally, very fast) so I am a bit confused why. I am not very knowledgeable about PSUs so may you explain to me what are the rails about and what makes it less than 550W?

--

Finally if it's really my PSU what are the brands/specific model (for RX570 or similar GPUs) that you guys would recommend? I would love a quality PSU but I am also on a budget.. as long as it is enough to power my PC and doesn't kill my GPU and HDD that would be great.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
The GPU may not be salvageable. Artifacting is more often than not, failing VRAM. At this point, a PSU upgrade is about protecting the next GPU more than this one. But it's certainly worth trying with a better PSU. Always fix the brakes before worrying about the sunroof!

We house a curated PSU tier list here. I wouldn't go below Tier B for a 570 or something comparable and if you're getting ambitious with your next GPU and going to the high end, you want to stay in Tier A.

 

sunsetwatermelon

Commendable
Jul 3, 2019
9
0
1,510
0
The GPU may not be salvageable. Artifacting is more often than not, failing VRAM. At this point, a PSU upgrade is about protecting the next GPU more than this one. But it's certainly worth trying with a better PSU. Always fix the brakes before worrying about the sunroof!

We house a curated PSU tier list here. I wouldn't go below Tier B for a 570 or something comparable and if you're getting ambitious with your next GPU and going to the high end, you want to stay in Tier A.

Thanks a lot for the tier list! However I am an absolute noob with PSU specs and stuff, so I do not know what the "rails" mean and I am pretty bad with numbers too. Can you explain to me like I am 5? :LOL: Your help is deeply appreciated.
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Thanks a lot for the tier list! However I am an absolute noob with PSU specs and stuff, so I do not know what the "rails" mean and I am pretty bad with numbers too. Can you explain to me like I am 5? :LOL: Your help is deeply appreciated.
You don't really need to know much about rails. To put it very simply, PSU has to supply +12V, +5V, and +3.3V power to different components. Think of it like your front door, your garage door, and your patio door.

Old "group-regulated" PSUs don't regulate very well because they're trying to juggle them all simultaneously. Which tends to fail spectacularly on computers of the last 20 years because there's a lot of stuff that requires +12V power (your CPU and GPU) while things that use the other "rails" require much less power. Think of it like walking a tightrope and then someone makes you hold a bowling ball in one of your hands.

Modern PSUs basically start with the +12V and then "generate" the +5V and +3.3V power as needed.

Quality PSUs will also have better components across the board than this Gamdias PSU.
 
Reactions: sunsetwatermelon

sunsetwatermelon

Commendable
Jul 3, 2019
9
0
1,510
0
You don't really need to know much about rails. To put it very simply, PSU has to supply +12V, +5V, and +3.3V power to different components. Think of it like your front door, your garage door, and your patio door.

Old "group-regulated" PSUs don't regulate very well because they're trying to juggle them all simultaneously. Which tends to fail spectacularly on computers of the last 20 years because there's a lot of stuff that requires +12V power (your CPU and GPU) while things that use the other "rails" require much less power. Think of it like walking a tightrope and then someone makes you hold a bowling ball in one of your hands.

Modern PSUs basically start with the +12V and then "generate" the +5V and +3.3V power as needed.

Quality PSUs will also have better components across the board than this Gamdias PSU.
Thank you! That was really easy to understand, I've tried understanding by Googling but it seems a little bit confusing there but now I understand. From the tier list, there are different types of rails, I would assume that ( multi/single-rail switchable ) is the best since it can prioritize power into a rail when it needs and go back to multiple rails (the doors like you said).

I have some semblance of hope that my GPU can be fixed since I can't really afford to get a new PSU and a GPU at the same time. Since it can show signal occasionally (no artifacts) but only for a bit now, is probably a sign that my PSU is failing and that is why Windows keeps on scanning and trying to repair my :C drive every time I boot (guess my SSD is getting affected...).

I might still send my GPU to test if it works in another PC but at this point I am 90% convinced it's my PSU since GPU is a power-hungry component and my PSU is some obscure brand.

I would like to confirm, would it be okay to buy a 550W quality branded PSU if I were to overclock my GPU in the future or is it just safe to get a 600W PSU?
 

DSzymborski

Titan
Moderator
Thank you! That was really easy to understand, I've tried understanding by Googling but it seems a little bit confusing there but now I understand. From the tier list, there are different types of rails, I would assume that ( multi/single-rail switchable ) is the best since it can prioritize power into a rail when it needs and go back to multiple rails (the doors like you said).

I have some semblance of hope that my GPU can be fixed since I can't really afford to get a new PSU and a GPU at the same time. Since it can show signal occasionally (no artifacts) but only for a bit now, is probably a sign that my PSU is failing and that is why Windows keeps on scanning and trying to repair my :C drive every time I boot (guess my SSD is getting affected...).

I might still send my GPU to test if it works in another PC but at this point I am 90% convinced it's my PSU since GPU is a power-hungry component and my PSU is some obscure brand.

I would like to confirm, would it be okay to buy a 550W quality branded PSU if I were to overclock my GPU in the future or is it just safe to get a 600W PSU?
A quality 550W would be just fine. Just not if you plan on getting a 3080 or something in the not-too-distant future.
 
Reactions: sunsetwatermelon

sunsetwatermelon

Commendable
Jul 3, 2019
9
0
1,510
0
You don't really need to know much about rails. To put it very simply, PSU has to supply +12V, +5V, and +3.3V power to different components. Think of it like your front door, your garage door, and your patio door.

Old "group-regulated" PSUs don't regulate very well because they're trying to juggle them all simultaneously. Which tends to fail spectacularly on computers of the last 20 years because there's a lot of stuff that requires +12V power (your CPU and GPU) while things that use the other "rails" require much less power. Think of it like walking a tightrope and then someone makes you hold a bowling ball in one of your hands.

Modern PSUs basically start with the +12V and then "generate" the +5V and +3.3V power as needed.

Quality PSUs will also have better components across the board than this Gamdias PSU.
Hello! I did some research on what PSUs I could buy for my PC and here's what I came up with:

  1. ADATA XPG Core Reactor 650W 80Plus Gold Full Modular (Tier A/single-rail)
  2. MSI MPG A650GF (Tier A/multi-rail)
  3. Cooler Master MWE 750 80Plus Bronze (Tier B/low priority)
I know that 650W is probably too much, I am willing to go until 600W but it seems like it's really high up the tier list and my seller has it, also I think I can afford it.
Which is perfect for my system? Other than it being overkill in terms of watts? I will keep on using my RX570 if it's still alive but if not I might add another one for years to come.

Lastly do some PSU come in bigger sizes than others? I just wanna make sure things fit..

I'm going to survey if I can get other brands like be quiet!, bitfenix, and fractal design and add more to this forum.
 

sunsetwatermelon

Commendable
Jul 3, 2019
9
0
1,510
0
Hi again, I hope anyone could reply to me this time.

I got the XPG Core Reactor 650W and the GPU is working (I am using it right now, using the RX570). But it only works on second restart, first boot no signal. Anybody knows anything that could be an issue?
I have installed the latest AMD drivers.
 

sunsetwatermelon

Commendable
Jul 3, 2019
9
0
1,510
0
Hi, sorry, I was away at that time. You got a solid PSU, however. Now, you've at least ruled out that junky one.

I haven't run into a definite second boot issue before, I'll ask around. Hopefully someone else has seen this one.
Okay, thanks a lot. I'll be waiting and my inboxes are always open because I am determined to solve this issue once and for all. I'll also wait if anyone else sees this and can give any ideas on how to fix it.
 

ASK THE COMMUNITY