[SOLVED] Ryzen 1200 + RX 570

Aug 6, 2019
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That's it. I don't have so much money and that build is the best I can buy. I want to know if it's a good idea pairing a Ryzen 1200 with the RX 570 (4 or 8 gb). What about bottleneck? Will games be playable at 1080p? And what about Ryzen 1200 + RX 580 (in Argentina there's only 8 dollars difference between rx 570 8gb and rx 580 4gb)
 
You typically need all PCIe power cables installed. If your PSU isn't so great, a 570 might be a safer bet as it should have somewhat lower power draw than a 580. A PSU that advertises having 2x PCIe 6+2pin cables should be compatible though, as each 6+2 pin cable can be used as either a 6-pin or an 8-pin.

As far as "bottlenecking" goes, it shouldn't be much of a concern though. Performance isn't going to become awful just because you have a somewhat faster graphics card. You just may not get that extra performance whenever your performance is being limited by the CPU.

And if you are only getting 8GB of system RAM, it's possible that the RX 570 8GB might potentially be a better option than an RX 580 4GB in certain newer and upcoming games. In the event that a demanding game requires more VRAM than a graphics card has, it would normally shuffle some things out to system RAM, but if you don't have much system RAM to spare, that could have a more significant impact on performance. So, the extra VRAM is more likely to be beneficial in those cases, and VRAM requirements are only likely to climb in future games.
 
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Lutfij

Titan
Moderator
To get a concise answer from us, we'll need to know your full proposed system's specs. Often times people just drop all they have on one or two parts and skip out on other critical components, namely being the PSU.

If I were you I'd look at the 1650 or the 1660Ti, they will both draw much less power than the RX's you've listed above, in spite of being cheaper on the wallet, to purchase.
 
If I were you I'd look at the 1650 or the 1660Ti, they will both draw much less power than the RX's you've listed above, in spite of being cheaper on the wallet, to purchase.
I don't know about Argentina, but at least in the US, a 1650 typically costs a bit more than an RX 570 while not performing as well. It's probably only worth considering if they have a very low-end power supply. And the RX 580 and 1660 Ti are not even in the same product segment. The 1660 Ti is over 30% faster, but costs more than 50% more, which likely prices it outside their budget, assuming pricing is similar there. Maybe the 1660 (non-Ti) would be worth considering, as it offers performance roughly in-between an RX 580 and a 1660 Ti, but it too is priced higher than those RX cards.

I agree that knowing the rest of your planned components would be useful though. As well as the specs of your current computer, if you have one, in case something like a graphics card upgrade alone might be enough to make it good for gaming.

As for the performance of an RX 570 and RX 580, they should be pretty good for 1080p in current games, though some of the most demanding recent releases might need their settings turned down slightly to maintain over 60fps. In general, an RX 580 will typically be around 10-15% faster than an RX 570, though when comparing an 8GB 570 against a 4GB 580, there may be some games where the 570 with more VRAM may offer more stable performance, but I would still expect the 580 to usually be the better performer.

And an RX 570 would in turn be around 10-15% faster than a GTX 1650 on average, though the exact amount can vary a fair amount depending on which architecture a game is better suited for. Versions of the 1650 without an external power connector will tend to be a little bit slower than those that have one. A GTX 1660 should typically be around 15-20% faster than an RX 580, which might be worth considering if it doesn't cost too much more.

Any of these cards would likely work reasonably well with a Ryzen 1200, especially if that processor is overclocked a bit, though there are a handful newer games that perform smoothest on a processor with more cores, and that will likely become more common in the future. If you can find something like a Ryzen 1600 or 2600 for not too much more, they might be worth considering, as the 6 cores and 12 threads those CPUs offer are likely to keep them relevant longer.
 
Aug 6, 2019
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10
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Hello, thank you both for reply me. I don't have any pc. Mi build idea is:
Mother: Gigabyte AB350M Gaming 3
RAM: 8 gb (2x4) 2666hz (don't know if HyperX or Ballistic Sport)
CPU: Ryzen 1200 (wish I can buy 1600 but that depends on country economy so that's why I'm asking about R3 1200)
GPU: RX 570 (8gb) or RX 580 (4gb)
PSU: Thermaltake 600w 80 plus white.

NVIDIA Gpus are much expensive. Rx 570 costs around 130$ and GTX 1050 200$.
I said the rx 570 8gb and rx 580 4gb have the same prize but I don't know if rx 570 8gb will be better because of the poor cpu. Maybe a rx 580 is too much for the Ryzen 1200 and it will be awful playing while components bottleneck a lot.
But I have a question about RX 580 4gb and it's that is the Sapphire rx 580. That card has 8 pin + 6 pin. Some people say that 8 pin is enough. Don't know if the PSU that i want have 8+6.
 
You typically need all PCIe power cables installed. If your PSU isn't so great, a 570 might be a safer bet as it should have somewhat lower power draw than a 580. A PSU that advertises having 2x PCIe 6+2pin cables should be compatible though, as each 6+2 pin cable can be used as either a 6-pin or an 8-pin.

As far as "bottlenecking" goes, it shouldn't be much of a concern though. Performance isn't going to become awful just because you have a somewhat faster graphics card. You just may not get that extra performance whenever your performance is being limited by the CPU.

And if you are only getting 8GB of system RAM, it's possible that the RX 570 8GB might potentially be a better option than an RX 580 4GB in certain newer and upcoming games. In the event that a demanding game requires more VRAM than a graphics card has, it would normally shuffle some things out to system RAM, but if you don't have much system RAM to spare, that could have a more significant impact on performance. So, the extra VRAM is more likely to be beneficial in those cases, and VRAM requirements are only likely to climb in future games.
 
Reactions: Cirices

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