Question Ryzen 5 3600X always works on high clock speed

Nov 2, 2020
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Why my CPU works on high clock speed? Now I only use google meet, but CPU core speed still is 4341.20MHz. I think this is problem. Can you help me?CPU core speed
 
Temps are fine, But why does a processor need such high core speed when it is not loaded?
Are you a former Intel user?

It's the way Ryzen works: AMD calls it a 'rush to idle'. You may think it's 'constantly' at high clocks but it's not really. In lightly threaded workloads (like in a web browser) most cores are actually in a deep sleep, with a single core popping to a high clock speed (frequently max boost clock) to get some work done as fast as possible. When done the scheduler moves next process that pops up to another core which lets the processor put that one back to sleep. If you've set up your system right the Windows scheduler is using the best cores in your processor to do that and keeping the others mostly in a deep sleep state.

You can watch this in action with HWInfo64 and look at each core's clock or multiplier. But remember it's doing this process up to 100 times a second which is much faster than the monitoring program can track it. You're watching fast action through a slow camera lens, so to speak, so it's not accurate. But you will be able to see that most of the cores are in a deep sleep, most of the time...look at the Core C6 Residency readouts.
 
Last edited:
Nov 2, 2020
23
0
10
0
Are you a former Intel user?

It's the way Ryzen works: AMD calls it a 'rush to idle'. You may think it's 'constantly' at high clocks but it's not really. In lightly threaded workloads (like in a web browser) most cores are actually in a deep sleep, with a single core popping to a high clock speed (frequently max boost clock) to get some work done as fast as possible. When done the scheduler moves next process that pops up to another core which lets the processor put that one back to sleep. If you've set up your system right the Windows scheduler is using the best cores in your processor to do that and keeping the others mostly in a deep sleep state.

You can watch this in action with HWInfo64 and look at each core's clock or multiplier. But remember it's doing this process up to 100 times a second which is much faster than the monitoring program can track it. So you're watching fast action through a slow camera lens, so to speak.
My previous processor was from Intel. Thanks for the explanation
 

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