Review SanDisk Extreme Pro v2 Portable SSD Review: High-dollar Design and Performance

nofanneeded

Commendable
Sep 29, 2019
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With the USB 20 Gbps link, the drive even outperformed the Thunderbolt 3 competition under various workloads
This is not true , because the internal hardware of TB3 drives tested does not match ... If you want the best out of TB3 , you should get an empty TB3 box and put the best NVME SSD inside it.

Tomshardware needs to review this product

http://www.orico.cc/usmobile/product/detail/id/6861

Use it with fastest PCIe Gen 3.0 NVME SSD around.
 

seanwebster

Contributing Writer
Editor
Aug 30, 2018
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This is not true , because the internal hardware of TB3 drives tested does not match ... If you want the best out of TB3 , you should get an empty TB3 box and put the best NVME SSD inside it.

Tomshardware needs to review this product

http://www.orico.cc/usmobile/product/detail/id/6861

Use it with fastest PCIe Gen 3.0 NVME SSD around.
At that point you wouldn't be testing the actual portable SSDs as they are, you would just be testing the performance of the internal SSDs in that one enclosure. Thus, comparing just the underlying storage alone. You can't compare the performance or thermal characteristics of these portable SSDs without using the default enclosures and bridge chips.

I have tested the internal M.2 SSDs by themselves on an X570 platform, you can read my reviews on them if you are interested.

Also, that enclosure is made with an older Alpine Ridge TB3 controller, not titan ridge or newer like on some of these portable SSDs. So, its older tech.
 

nofanneeded

Commendable
Sep 29, 2019
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At that point you wouldn't be testing the actual portable SSDs as they are, you would just be testing the performance of the internal SSDs in that one enclosure. Thus, comparing just the underlying storage alone. You can't compare the performance or thermal characteristics of these portable SSDs without using the default enclosures and bridge chips.

I have tested the internal M.2 SSDs by themselves on an X570 platform, you can read my reviews on them if you are interested.

Also, that enclosure is made with an older Alpine Ridge TB3 controller, not titan ridge or newer like on some of these portable SSDs. So, its older tech.
TB3 is more popular then USB 3.2 2x2 which is impossible to find in notebook and very rare in Desktops.

Can you please gather the best NVME external boxes in the market and test them with something like Samsung 970 Evo Plus or 970 pro ? make a round up ? and see if they reach 3000MB/s ???


Because all portable SSD are a box with internal off the shelves NVME SSD .. I am 100% sure you will find the same Version of SANDISK Extreme Pro as a stand alone NVME ...

Also you need to tear down the External drives in each review to see which NVME SSD is in there ... it will also help you to determine TBW/IOPS if the external drive does not say just by discovering which NVME SSD they are using inside.
 
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seanwebster

Contributing Writer
Editor
Aug 30, 2018
144
44
1,620
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TB3 is more popular then USB 3.2 2x2 which is impossible to find in notebook and very rare in Desktops.

Can you please gather the best NVME external boxes in the market and test them with something like Samsung 970 Evo Plus or 970 pro ? make a round up ? and see if they reach 3000MB/s ???
I review all kinds of SSDs, including TB3 and USB of all types. I'll look into it. Is there anything specific you are looking for?
Because all portable SSD are a box with internal off the shelves NVME SSD .. I am 100% sure you will find the same Version of SANDISK Extreme Pro as a stand alone NVME ...

Also you need to tear down the External drives in each review to see which NVME SSD is in there ... it will also help you to determine TBW/IOPS if the external drive does not say just by discovering which NVME SSD they are using inside.
Yes, most are just M.2s in an enclosure. It's hard to or impossible to open some of these without destroying them, which I try best to avoid. This drive is powered by a WD SN730E, as mentioned in the review, so I already know the specs inside and out. The WD Black P50 uses the SN750E. The cheaper WD My Passport SSD and SanDisk Extreme have WD's Blue SN550E inside them, too. You can read my reviews on those to learn more if you like.

WD Black SN750: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/wd-black-sn750-ssd,5957.html
WD Blue SN550: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/wd-blue-sn550-m2-nvme-ssd-review-best-dramless-ssd-yet

I have rarely seen a company include that metric for a portable SSD. Typically, they are just warrantied by time alone. Also, most endurance ratings are conservative, but yes, you can get an estimate of expected endurance by understanding which SSD is powering the device. It's just that TBW warranty coverage restrictions do not apply to most portables.

As for IOPS - what is the point of testing the device outside of its designed enclosure if it is forever going to be used in the enclosure? I can test portable SSDs' IOPS perfectly fine as they come. They are not going to be used as internal SSDs, only as portables. So, comparing the performance without the bridge chip they come with is irrelevant. And again, I've already reviewed the internal devices as linked above. ;)
 
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