Question Sapphire NITRO+ Radeon RX 6700 XT

Oct 23, 2020
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Hi,

I'm buying a Sapphire NITRO+ Radeon RX 6700 XT Graphics Card and am wondering about how best to use it, coming from a noob starting point on graphics cards, etc... Sure I've read about it but it's a new world to me.

I am getting it with the plan of, maybe in a year or two, getting a new top of the range graphics card and PC solely for gaming and use the RX 6700 XT for the design, photography processing work, (as I've read the 12GB will last into the furture better?). At the moment, I will be using it for iRacing + 3 TV's and 3D design programs, Raw photos, video editing. Adobe Lightroom, Photoshop, etc...

What is BIOS? and how best to use it... both for iRacing and designing work?

Overclocking?

Will later driver updates give it more performance, features, etc...

Thanks.
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
6700XT is basically a top of the line graphics card today. Well into the high end gaming range. A year from now you will likely see some slower models made available, but the current 6900XT is likely to remain the top card (from AMD) until into 2023. GPU launches tend to be about 18 months apart.

BIOS is Basic Input Output System it is the software that comes pre-loaded onto motherboards, GPUs, and other hardware. BIOS software tells the system what hardware it supports, how to connect to it, and how to get the system started in preparation to load an Operating System.

Not really something you use too much beyond initial setup. Once you have the components installed, load up the BIOS, set XMP memory profile to get their advertised speed and configure the fans how you like them, select a boot device, you don't really have to deal with it again.

Overclocking is whole other thing where you would use the settings available in the BIOS for tweaking the system. AMD Ryzen is not really worth overclocking, just get a big heatsink and let it do its thing. The defaults work for most people. And if you are doing work, you don't actually want the potential instability that overclocking can cause. It can take a long time to narrow down the maximum settings that offer stability in all the potential tasks you perform. Rather than spend the time on that, you could just get a faster CPU like the 5800X or 5900X. The extra cores will help out your Adobe products.

GPU overclocking is fairly straightforward to do with software, but again, not really necessary.
 
Oct 23, 2020
78
1
35
0
6700XT is basically a top of the line graphics card today. Well into the high end gaming range. A year from now you will likely see some slower models made available, but the current 6900XT is likely to remain the top card (from AMD) until into 2023. GPU launches tend to be about 18 months apart.

BIOS is Basic Input Output System it is the software that comes pre-loaded onto motherboards, GPUs, and other hardware. BIOS software tells the system what hardware it supports, how to connect to it, and how to get the system started in preparation to load an Operating System.

Not really something you use too much beyond initial setup. Once you have the components installed, load up the BIOS, set XMP memory profile to get their advertised speed and configure the fans how you like them, select a boot device, you don't really have to deal with it again.

Overclocking is whole other thing where you would use the settings available in the BIOS for tweaking the system. AMD Ryzen is not really worth overclocking, just get a big heatsink and let it do its thing. The defaults work for most people. And if you are doing work, you don't actually want the potential instability that overclocking can cause. It can take a long time to narrow down the maximum settings that offer stability in all the potential tasks you perform. Rather than spend the time on that, you could just get a faster CPU like the 5800X or 5900X. The extra cores will help out your Adobe products.

GPU overclocking is fairly straightforward to do with software, but again, not really necessary.
Thank you very much for your explanation.

You say that GPU launches tend to be about 18 months apart. What about CPU launches? How far apart do they be?
 

Eximo

Titan
Ambassador
Thank you very much for your explanation.

You say that GPU launches tend to be about 18 months apart. What about CPU launches? How far apart do they be?
Roughly the same, though you might see early Intel next gen hardware end of this year. Likely laptops first, it is what they tend to do.

DDR5 is next for both AMD and Intel, so basically a complete re-build to upgrade.

5600X is about the fastest mid-range CPU available now. Compares favorably to Intel's 11th gen i5, but once you start increasing the core count AMD makes more sense. more power efficient processors at the moment.
 

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