Question Screen goes black with fans running at full speed

May 3, 2022
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Hello everyone,
I have just started regularly using my desktop computer, but after some time the screen goes black and the fans run at full speed. When I use RDP and check GPUTweak, the gpu temperature is shown as 0 degrees celcius
My specs are:
Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-10700KF CPU
64GB Corsair DDR4 RAM
MSI MAG Z490 TOMAHAWK motherboard
ROG RTX3050 Gaming OC

Thanks
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
PSU model?

Did this system EVER run properly, and then at some point you started having problems, or did it never run properly?

Did you built this or did somebody else?

What else can you tell us as far as what you haven't yet, which there is ALWAYS something more, and what you've already tried?
 
May 3, 2022
2
0
10
0
It did run fine initially, the problem has only started occuring recently
In-Win P-series 750W
I helped my dad build it
 
Last edited:

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Is it the PB-750w model?

What motherboard BIOS version do you have currently installed?

Did you install all of the relevant drivers, after manually downloading them, directly from the MSI product page for your motherboard?

Did you do a clean install of Windows after building this system or are you using a Windows installation that pre-dates this build and was used for a previous system?





If there are any steps listed here that you have not already done, it would be advisable to do so if for no other reason than to be able to say you've already done it and eliminate that possibility.



First,

Make sure your motherboard has the MOST recent BIOS version installed. If it does not, then update. This solves a high number of issues even in cases where the release that is newer than yours makes no mention of improving graphics card or other hardware compatibility. They do not list every change they have made when they post a new BIOS release. In cases where you DO already have the latest BIOS version, simply resetting the BIOS as follows has a fairly high percentage chance of effecting a positive change in some cases so it is ALWAYS worth TRYING, at the very least.




Second,

Go to the product page for your motherboard on the manufacturer website. Download and install the latest driver versions for the chipset, storage controllers, audio and network adapters. Do not skip installing a newer driver just because you think it is not relevant to the problem you are having. The drivers for one device can often affect ALL other devices and a questionable driver release can cause instability in the OS itself. They don't release new drivers just for fun. If there is a new driver release for a component, there is a good reason for it. The same goes for BIOS updates. When it comes to the chipset drivers, if your motherboard manufacturer lists a chipset driver that is newer than what the chipset developer (Intel or AMD, for our purposes) lists, then use that one. If Intel (Or AMD) shows a chipset driver version that is newer than what is available from the motherboard product page, then use that one. Always use the newest chipset driver that you can get and always use ONLY the chipset drivers available from either the motherboard manufacturer, AMD or Intel.


IF you have other hardware installed or attached to the system that are not a part of the systems covered by the motherboard drivers, then go to the support page for THAT component and check to see if there are newer drivers available for that as well. If there are, install them.


Third,

Make sure your memory is running at the correct advertised speed in the BIOS. This may require that you set the memory to run at the XMP profile settings. Also, make sure you have the memory installed in the correct slots and that they are running in dual channel which you can check by installing CPU-Z and checking the Memory and SPD tabs. For all modern motherboards that are dual channel memory architectures, from the last ten years at least, if you have two sticks installed they should be in the A2 (Called DDR4_1 on some boards) or B2 (Called DDR4_2 on some boards) which are ALWAYS the SECOND and FOURTH slots over from the CPU socket, counting TOWARDS the edge of the motherboard EXCEPT on boards that only have two memory slots total. In that case, if you have two modules it's not rocket science, but if you have only one, then install it in the A1 or DDR4_1 slot.



Fourth (And often tied for most important along with an up-to-date motherboard BIOS),

A clean install of the graphics card drivers. Regardless of whether you "already installed the newest drivers" for your graphics card or not, it is OFTEN a good idea to do a CLEAN install of the graphics card drivers. Just installing over the old drivers OR trying to use what Nvidia and AMD consider a clean install is not good enough and does not usually give the same result as using the Display Driver Uninstaller utility. This has a very high success rate and is always worth a shot.


If you have had both Nvidia and AMD cards installed at any point on that operating system then you will want to run the DDU twice. Once for the old card drivers (ie, Nvidia or AMD) and again for the currently installed graphics card drivers (ie, AMD or Nvidia). So if you had an Nvidia card at some point in the past, run it first for Nvidia and then after that is complete, run it again for AMD if you currently have an AMD card installed.


Graphics card driver CLEAN install guide using the Wagnard tools DDU



And last, but not least, if you have never done a CLEAN install of Windows, or have upgraded from an older version to Windows 10, or have been through several spring or fall major Windows updates, it might be a very good idea to consider doing a clean install of Windows if none of these other solutions has helped. IF you are using a Windows installation from a previous system and you didn't do a clean install of Windows after building the new system, then it's 99.99% likely that you NEED to do a CLEAN install before trying any other solutions.


How to do a CLEAN installation of Windows 10, the RIGHT way
 

Tolis_GR

Honorable
If the card is picking 0 celsius and you re on an automatic fan profile then it will never bother speeding the fans up while actually getting hot resulting in overheating and eventually shutting down. To make sure this is the case, force a fixed fan profile of high rpms and head on a long gaming session. If it's a go then we have isolated the black screen issue.
For the 0 celsius issue: Are you using any riser cables ? If so remove.
Extreme low or extreme high false readings for temps could be either a sign of poor power delivery/poor connectivity which could trigger any sort of unresponsiveness or a failing sensor. Maybe you should inspect all of your cables, or try new ones. I had a card shutting down due to a false temp reading coming from a melting pcie cable.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Right. That's the reason I've suggested making sure the motherboard BIOS is up to date, and that there is a clean install of the graphics drivers. At least then we can make sure that the reporting of 0°C on the GPU isn't due to any of those things. Checking to see if you can manually get the fans to engage is a good idea though.

I'm doubtful about poor power delivery, at least in regards to the PSU, since that InWin P series, if it's the one I believe it to be, is fairly good considering it uses the same platform as the Thermaltake Toughpower Grand RGB. Then again, ANY PSU can be faulty, so it's no sure thing regardless of model. Just makes it a bit less likely though.
 

Tolis_GR

Honorable
Agreed, my comment was supposed to add up on the standard troubleshooting methodology, not deny it. 😇
InWin could be indeed good and easily handle the load, my concern on delivery goes with a bad or shorting cable on the V rail. Once, i had a bad time troubleshooting for a couple of days a pc that would give black screens on a healthy psu/gpu only to find out a failing sleeved power cable (not saying this is the case here for sure)
 

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