[SOLVED] Seagate External 4 TB HDD Not Detected By Two Different Computers

Kirbyarm

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Nov 9, 2013
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It was working one moment, then suddenly a specific folder in it wouldn't load (first time I've ever had a problem with an external within 3 externals in the last 5 years), so I backed out, tried other folders, they opened just fine, tried the problem folder again, wouldn't load, same issue again. So then I closed out the explorer window, tried disconnected and reconnecting the device and it just won't get detected at all, even if I plug it into my other desktop PC. The Windows 10 sound effect plays that it knows a device was just plugged in, and the LED on the HDD lights up. It was working perfectly fine for the year or so that I've owned it until now.

Things of note:

-The two other HDDs are much older and smaller variants of Seagate HDDs (1 TB and 2 TB respectively) and are still working perfectly fine.
-I've tried swapping out the USB connector cords between them to rule out the cord as an issue. The cord from the problem device works fine on the other externals etc

Are there any troubleshooting methods I can use to recover the data or better yet, get it working again?

Thanks for reading everyone.
 
Last edited:

Grobe

Distinguished
The way to get your data back is to revert to last backup. You did backup all important files (not having all eggs in one basket), right ?

If no - you harddrive is most likely dead, and to retrieve any data you must have a professional data recovery company to do it for you.
You can still attempt various data recovery software, but if the failure is caused by a defective r/w head it may do further damage to the disk if you continue to try to recover files.

All in all, it boils down to the importance of your files, how much you're willing to pay to retrieve the data or how big risk you're willing to take by attempting to recover some data by yourself.
 

Grobe

Distinguished
The way to get your data back is to revert to last backup. You did backup all important files (not having all eggs in one basket), right ?

If no - you harddrive is most likely dead, and to retrieve any data you must have a professional data recovery company to do it for you.
You can still attempt various data recovery software, but if the failure is caused by a defective r/w head it may do further damage to the disk if you continue to try to recover files.

All in all, it boils down to the importance of your files, how much you're willing to pay to retrieve the data or how big risk you're willing to take by attempting to recover some data by yourself.
 

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