Question Seperating SSD/HDD - Everyday Use

Nov 30, 2020
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Hey all!

I'm basically new to the SSD world, super late I know but it's also my first time using multiple storage devices, I would used to do everything on a single HDD.

My question today is how I can make sure my files end up on my HDD and not SSD as its only 128 gigs intended only for my OS and chrome (since apparently it won't give you a choice).

For example if I download a picture or a file or if I put stuff on the desktop. How can I ensure it will be put on the HDD and not the SSD?

Thank you :)
 

BogdanH

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Sep 21, 2020
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Windows Desktop uses the storage where Windows is installed. Same is true for Documents, Downloads, Music, etc. Means, if Windows is installed on SSD, things will be by default saved on SSD -unless you don't specify otherwise (if/when asked where to save).
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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You can save your personal files to anywhere you want. Make a couple of folders on the HDD for MyDocs/MyPics/etc.
Call them whatever you want.
Applications have gotten really good at working with multiple drives.

The next time you use that same application, it will probably use that location as the suggested place to save.

You CAN relocate the actual Libraries, but that can turn out really badly if you do it wrong.
Just save where you wish.


Browsers: You can change the default Save location in the browser settings.


Desktop: Create a folder on the HDD for MyDesktopStuff.
Make a shortcut pointer to that folder, and put it on the actual desktop.
 
Nov 30, 2020
62
3
35
0
Windows Desktop uses the storage where Windows is installed. Same is true for Documents, Downloads, Music, etc. Means, if Windows is installed on SSD, things will be by default saved on SSD -unless you don't specify otherwise (if/when asked where to save).
Hmmmm I see.

So should I have multiple folders in my harddrive for say "desktop", "programs" etc. Will games installed on my harddrive also need a documents folder in the harddrive. This is all so confusing aha.

Feels like it's a lot simpler to just have the one drive.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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Hmmmm I see.

So should I have multiple folders in my harddrive for say "desktop", "programs" etc. Will games installed on my harddrive also need a documents folder in the harddrive. This is all so confusing aha.

Feels like it's a lot simpler to just have the one drive.
If you're not prepared to manage multiple drives, having one large one is absolutely preferable.
I have multiples.

But...a 120GB SSD is pretty much TooSmall these days. It will fill up faster than you think.

Steam games can be installed on any drive.
Steam games location
In the steam client:
Steam
Settings
Downloads
Steam Library Folders
Add library folder


To move an already installed game
Games library
Right click the game
Properties
Local Files
Move Install Folder

--------------------------------
The other game platforms have a similar function.
 
Nov 30, 2020
62
3
35
0
You can save your personal files to anywhere you want. Make a couple of folders on the HDD for MyDocs/MyPics/etc.
Call them whatever you want.
Applications have gotten really good at working with multiple drives.

The next time you use that same application, it will probably use that location as the suggested place to save.

You CAN relocate the actual Libraries, but that can turn out really badly if you do it wrong.
Just save where you wish.


Browsers: You can change the default Save location in the browser settings.


Desktop: Create a folder on the HDD for MyDesktopStuff.
Make a shortcut pointer to that folder, and put it on the actual desktop.
Ah that makes sense, I could even have like "downloads" for example in my harddrive then just pin it to my start menu.

I'm just not sure how some programs will work that use documents and stuff like some games and Adobe.
 
Nov 30, 2020
62
3
35
0
If you're not prepared to manage multiple drives, having one large one is absolutely preferable.
I have multiples.

But...a 120GB SSD is pretty much TooSmall these days. It will fill up faster than you think.

Steam games can be installed on any drive.
Steam games location
In the steam client:
Steam
Settings
Downloads
Steam Library Folders
Add library folder


To move an already installed game
Games library
Right click the game
Properties
Local Files
Move Install Folder

--------------------------------
The other game platforms have a similar function.
Yea the idea was to use the ssd for the OS and 1tb harddrive for everything else.
 

USAFRet

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Mar 16, 2013
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Ah that makes sense, I could even have like "downloads" for example in my harddrive then just pin it to my start menu.

I'm just not sure how some programs will work that use documents and stuff like some games and Adobe.
Applications should be installed on the C drive, with the OS. Makes little sense to try to install them elsewhere.
Generally, they don't take a lot of space.

The files created by them do.

But, some things DO save some data on the C drive anyway. No matter what you do.
At the very least, temp files.
 
Nov 30, 2020
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It can be done, but you'll end up spending too much time in managing that space.

And remember, a "120GB" SSD should not be filled more than about 80-85GB. You need to leave some free space for the TRIM function to work.
Yep for sure, thus only having OS and chrome on it.

Thanks for all the info :)
 

BogdanH

Upstanding
Sep 21, 2020
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Almost all programs that deal with a bit bigger amount of data (image & video editors, 3D software, office, etc.) have an option where you can define where you wish your files to be saved by default -just look in preferences (or similar) for each program.
Most games are by default installed on D drive (if there exist one).
 
Nov 30, 2020
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So I was doing some research on YouTube and found a neato method where you just make a program files folder in your harddrive etc and install program's that way, you can also just link the default my documents folder to the my documents folder on the harddrive so if anything defaulted to anything it will automatically go in the harddrive.

Linus has a great video when you search "managing ssd and hdd".

I think this just about solves my issue.
 

USAFRet

Titan
Moderator
Mar 16, 2013
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So I was doing some research on YouTube and found a neato method where you just make a program files folder in your harddrive etc and install program's that way, you can also just link the default my documents folder to the my documents folder on the harddrive so if anything defaulted to anything it will automatically go in the harddrive.

Linus has a great video when you search "managing ssd and hdd".

I think this just about solves my issue.
You can install applications anywhere. The do NOT need to be in a folder called "ProgramFiles".
You just tell it where during the installation of the program.

If the thing you found involves editing the registry to do this, don't.

Also...
I wrote this redirection thing ages ago. But it is mostly not needed today.
 
Oct 13, 2020
94
8
35
0
Hey all!

I'm basically new to the SSD world, super late I know but it's also my first time using multiple storage devices, I would used to do everything on a single HDD.

My question today is how I can make sure my files end up on my HDD and not SSD as its only 128 gigs intended only for my OS and chrome (since apparently it won't give you a choice).

For example if I download a picture or a file or if I put stuff on the desktop. How can I ensure it will be put on the HDD and not the SSD?

Thank you :)
This is a simple to use guide.

You will have to do this for each folder (e.g. documents, pictures, desktop etc), and if you have more than one user, for each user as well.

I have used this setup previously and for this exact same reason (I later upgraded to a larger SSD boot drive and reverted it back to the defaults on the C: drive).

NOTE: Updates to W10 are known to (sometimes) screw this up and revert it back to the defaults, so you will need to check after each large Windows update (4 per year), I have seen this and the drive was maxxed out and things started to stop working, errors all over the place.

The ideal solution of course is to have a larger boot SSD drive, if not this works, but with the caveats mentioned above.

Good luck.

https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/74952-move-location-documents-folder-windows-10-a.html
 
Nov 30, 2020
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Thanks for all the help all, I managed to figure it all out. It's a lot easier then I thought, basically just need to redirect everything other then the OS and Chrome to the harddrive. I did this altering the locations of individual folders like "my documents" etc as well as changing it on storage sense to have that extra layer of "make sure it doesn't end up on the ssd".

I just had a couple questions though. How do I see if my SSD has "trimming" enabled, I just discovered this last night, apparently it automatically deletes crap from your SSD?

Also, what happens with files that usually end up on Appdata or Temp with programs and what not.

Thanks :)
 

BogdanH

Upstanding
Sep 21, 2020
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If you're using more recent Windows 10, then TRIM is enabled (and working) by default. You can get some info here.
TRIM doesn't delete anything on SSD (no "cleanup" or similar).
TRIM is a command for SSD (sent by Windows) for "optimizing" storage space inside SSD (simplified explanation). This command is usually sent every two weeks or once per month. Depending on PC usage, user can change that interval in scheduler -in most cases, once per month is enough.
What does "optimizing" storage space means? Without TRIM, SSD would become slower over the time (on saving data)... let's say after a year of usage -but depends on how much data was written/deleted during that time.
 
Nov 30, 2020
62
3
35
0
If you're using more recent Windows 10, then TRIM is enabled (and working) by default. You can get some info here.
TRIM doesn't delete anything on SSD (no "cleanup" or similar).
TRIM is a command for SSD (sent by Windows) for "optimizing" storage space inside SSD (simplified explanation). This command is usually sent every two weeks or once per month. Depending on PC usage, user can change that interval in scheduler -in most cases, once per month is enough.
What does "optimizing" storage space means? Without TRIM, SSD would become slower over the time (on saving data)... let's say after a year of usage -but depends on how much data was written/deleted during that time.
Yeah I am using the latest windows 10.

Oh ok awesome, so I don't even have to do anything, good to know, thank you :).
 

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