Question Seriously need clarification about Older Operating systems

Nov 18, 2019
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In no way am I trying to start a fight by asking this and if it's in the wrong section I apologize. I really want to be informed about why it is so bad to use an older OS like Windows 8.1 or Windows 7? I know Microsoft doesn't support them, but I usually disable Windows Updates anyway as it installs crap that I don't need. I recently downloaded Windows 10 Pro from Microsoft's website and when windows update ran (without consent) it installed an Arabic update for an English OS. So when I restarted windows everything was in Arabic. After removing that update I discovered that my Audio, Bluetooth and Graphics drivers were also tampered with ruining my gaming performance. In one day I reinstalled windows 10 over 5 times on my desktop and never got the OS work actually function. I have 2 computers and they're basically the equivalent of road kill with windows 10 installed on them. I would expect the laptop to run slow, but there's no reason for the desktop to run terribly. If I don't get a solution to this problem I will probably end up switching to a mac which I something I absolutely dread. I know Linux is out there, but....wow...that was a freaking headache! I would prefer to stay on windows if it's possible. Can someone clear things up for me?


In case anyone is interested in my Computer Specs:

Dell Precision T7600
CPU: Intel Xeon E5 2620 @ 2.00GHz (2 Processors) 12 Cores 24 Threads Combined
RAM: 64 GB DDR3 @ 664MHz
Motherboard: Dell Inc. 082WXT
Graphics NVIDIA Quadro K4000 (3 GB)
LG 24MC37D-B Monitor (1920x1080)
Storage: 1TB Internal Hard Drives, 4TB Western Digital WD My Book 25EE USB Device (External)
Optical Drive: HL-DT-ST DVD+-RW GT80N
Audio: Realtek High Definition Audio


ASUS X751MA-DH01TQ
https://www.newegg.com/black-asus-x751ma-dh01tq-everyday-value/p/N82E16834232123
 

hotaru.hino

Prominent
Sep 1, 2020
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The primary concern is that the OS either isn't designed to handle the poking and prodding of today's internet or there's security holes in it that simply won't be fixed. But if using an older OS works for you, it works for you. However, connecting them to the internet can be a bad idea.
 
Nov 18, 2019
14
0
10
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The primary concern is that the OS either isn't designed to handle the poking and prodding of today's internet or there's security holes in it that simply won't be fixed. But if using an older OS works for you, it works for you. However, connecting them to the internet can be a bad idea.
Thank you for the fast reply and clearing that up for me. I primarily work remotely so that will be an issue. Damn I guess it's time to make some hard choices soon.
 

BogdanH

Proper
Sep 21, 2020
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I fully understand you, because I was in the same situation about 6 months ago. I ran Win7 SP1 (no further updates installed!) since it's release without any troubles. During those years I've tried Win10 twice (wishing I would like it) and both time I went back to Win7 after a week. Internet security? IMO, those who say Win10 is more internet "secure" than Win7, don't really know much about operating system and how data from internet is processed -but that's for another topic.
As for performance, stability and usability, I would still stick with Win7. Problem is, Win7 (in it's original state) doesn't recognize some of new hardware anymore. It started when motherboard manufacturer decided to use "new" USB chipset, which Win7 doesn't recognize. That is, USB mouse & keyboard don't work when you try to install Win7. There's workaround if you know how to modify Win7 ISO file (slipstream new USB drivers) -I did that, so all was fine. But I knew, in future I can't rely on that anymore as hardware and software evolves all the time.
To keep story short...
I downloaded modified Win10 ISO file (usually called "slim", "lite" or "compact") and magic happened: Win10 now looks and works like Win7, without any add-on crap (OneDrive, Cortana, XBox, Telemetry, etc.) and only uses less than 6GB on disk. What I also like is, updating is fully disabled by default -however I can still manually install cumulative updates if I wish to.
So, I found my solution.. hope you will too.
 
I have 2 computers and they're basically the equivalent of road kill with windows 10 installed on them.
I would expect the laptop to run slow, but there's no reason for the desktop to run terribly.
Windows 10 runs like crap on your pc, because you have no SSD in there. Every modern pc should have an SSD.

Recently did an experiment. Created backup clone of windows on HDD and tried to run it (normally windows is loaded from SSD).
Oh boy, my semi-decent pc (i5-3570k with 16GB ram) instantly became barely usable. Bootup took more than 5min. HDD activity at 100% all the time. Everything is super slow and runs like crap.

TLDR - get an SSD.
 
Reactions: BogdanH

hotaru.hino

Prominent
Sep 1, 2020
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I fully understand you, because I was in the same situation about 6 months ago. I ran Win7 SP1 (no further updates installed!) since it's release without any troubles. During those years I've tried Win10 twice (wishing I would like it) and both time I went back to Win7 after a week. Internet security? IMO, those who say Win10 is more internet "secure" than Win7, don't really know much about operating system and how data from internet is processed -but that's for another topic.
Windows 10 isn't more "secure" in that once the data leaves your computer it's some how more secure. It's secure in that any security vulnerabilities in Windows 7 won't be fixed (at least until someone pays Microsoft a lovely sum to get a team to fix it). So for example, ransomware may be able to exploit something in Windows 7, but that exploit got fixed in Windows 10.

That doesn't necessarily make it a bad thing though. Computer security is all about risk management. If you're willing to take a slightly higher risk because your requirements demand something else, well, more power to you.
 

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