Specific question about heat and USB 3.0 flash drives

alexjbriggs

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Hi all!

Thanks in advance for any advice/opinions on this. Sorry if there is a more appropriate section to post this? Maybe the storage section? Sorry, wasn't sure :(

What I Own: I just recently purchased an HP Stream 11 x360 (this model here)

What I am Looking at Purchasing: I am looking at purchasing a low profile usb 3.0 flash drive (the stream does have a usb 3.0 port). Here is the specific product I am looking at purchasing: SanDisk UltraFit 64GB 3.0

What I am looking to accomplish:I am looking to keep this drive plugged in to serve two purposes. 1) Obviously added storage (stream only has 32gb onboard) 2) Dedicate 4gb for Windows Readyboost - and the remaining to storage - (given the stream is only a 2gb system - I am aware that Readyboost does not serve as RAM, but even with an eMMC drive, I believe I will obtain a boost in performance from RB, because I believe this USB 3.0 device is is faster than the eMMC it's using). I am using latest build of Windows 10 TP (10162). From what I've read, Windows 10 greatly improved it's Readyboost feature (source here). I think this would be a great addition to my new HP Stream x360!

My Question/Concerns: I am cocerned about how hot the flash drives gets. I have read some comments on the product page for that specific drive that it does get very hot. However, I also know that all flash drives can get very hot. I know it depends on the make/model of the drive itself, and there are many factors that can determine how hot it runs. My question is, should I be worried about it getting too hot? Being it's such a low profile/small usb, it's likely to produce more heat than a normal sized USB would, but I don't want a long gadget sticking out of the laptop.

I do realize that I can also use the SD reader with an SD card for Readyboost. However, while the stream x360 does support SDXC, I can't find anything (even in the HP service and maintenance guide) that says it does or doesn't support UHS-I. So, assuming it doesn't, I would think I would greatly underachieve performance using the SD route over the USB 3.0 route.


Any thoughts, comments, concerns, etc great appreciated!!
 

Mattios

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Yes, USB 3.0 or better for readyboost - not SD cards.

Don't worry about heat. It shouldn't get too hot to operate. If it does, the manufacturer failed you so you can get it replaced. Just be sure to be reasonable and keep it fairly well ventilated.
 

Mattios

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Yes, USB 3.0 or better for readyboost - not SD cards.

Don't worry about heat. It shouldn't get too hot to operate. If it does, the manufacturer failed you so you can get it replaced. Just be sure to be reasonable and keep it fairly well ventilated.
 

alexjbriggs

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Thank you Mattios! I did a lot more research and found a review on notebookcheck for the same model Stream x360 I have. The review ran CrystalDiskMark 3.0 benchmark and the eMMC clocked in at 173.4 MB/s, which is obviously faster than the 130 MB/s the Ultra Fit drive is rated at. I saw a review also of the same 64GB Ultra Fit drive CrystalDiskMark 3.0 report was on that review, and clocked the Ultra Fit at about 134 MB/s.

Question: With all that^ being said, I likely won't benefit from Readyboost, correct? If not, that's ok, I'll just use it strictly as additional storage.

One final question: I have read reviews of the Ultra Fit and people stating it gets hotter than any other they have used. One review on newegg specifically complained it got too hot. Sandisk responded to that comment saying they are aware that it gets hotter than most, but still falls within regulations for operating temps. My question though, is if it DOES overheat, is my USB port at risk of damage? I'm less worried about the flash drive itself, because that's easily replaced. But could it damage the actual port itself? I'm afraid that if it is at risk of that, I would wind up in a battle between HP and Sandisk, because neither will want to claim responsibility for it, stating it was the other OEM's fault, and i'll be stuck with a notebook that now won't have a functioning 3.0 port..
 

Mattios

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Hi, honestly I wouldn't say readyboost is worth it. I don't know how it works in Windows 10, if it has improved. I'd suggest giving it a go and see what happens.

Regarding the drive, a) can't you just get a different USB 3.0 drive? There will be other small form factor ones. b) the drive would have to get insanely hot to melt the connector. Your port will be safe.
 

alexjbriggs

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Thank you for the response again, Mattios!

Just to mention - I couldn't find another low-profile with speeds as good as this for the budget I am on at the moment. Will look at upgrading to a more expensive one when able to. :)
 

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