Question ssd

R_1

Judicious
Herald
my first SSD a crucial adrenaline 50GB, is still running some 7 years later.
I installed a new 120GB kinston in my friends PC. he used if for years and then replaced it, gifting me the old one till it dies. I'm still waiting. I use it as an SSD read cache for my hard drives.
I do not have a dead SSD, I have several Dead HDD's laying around.
 

R_1

Judicious
Herald
its been my experience.
a hard drive has many moving parts, a rotating spindle, the motor, the actuators for the heads, the heads and that does not even address weakening magnetic fields in the pixie dust holding the data.
an SSD is a chip full of tiny switches. switches last a long long time.
that is not to say that they last forever, they are susceptible to their own gremlins and can fail without warning (backup, backup, backup), but again the failure numbers are lower than the failure numbers for HDD's.
 
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Darth Sicaedus

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Jun 30, 2009
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It really depends on your work load. SSDs have a limited amount of write cycles. Most manufacturer figures for Terabytes Written is a low ball figure to cover their rears. Most SSDs can see writes well beyond those published figures. You also need to look at the memory technology used to determine if the SSDs you are looking at will meet your needs for longevity vs speed. If you are looking for an SSD to store games, most of the work load will be reads anyway, so that thing will basically last forever.

Measuring SSD/Flash Endurance
NAND flash SSDs have a limited number of write cycles before the cell fails, expressed as its endurance rating. The cause is physical: every time the drive writes/erases, the flash memory cell’s oxide layer deteriorates. The type of cell impacts the number of write cycles before failure. Notice that when you compare SLC vs. MLC vs. TLC, you'll see key differences:
  • SLC: Single-level cell NAND flash supports 50,000 to 100,000 write cycles.
  • MLC: The 2-bit data multi-level cell (MLC) flash generally takes up to 3,000 write cycles. eMLC (enterprise MLC) sustains up to10,000 write cycles, and can reach 35,000 cycles on 3D NAND.
  • TLC: Triple-level cells (3-bit) NAND flash is low at 300-1000 write cycles, and can achieve 1500-3000 write cycles with 3D NAND.
When you’re thinking about write cycles, also keep write amplification in mind. Writes are not simply single writes in the user or application layers. They are multiple writes for redundancy and crash consistency, where the controller copies data to provide redundancy. Additional sources of write amplification include de-duplication, filesystem writes, metadata and log structures, and garbage collection.


Source
 
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Endre

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Manufacturers only seem to produce MLC, TLC, and QLC NAND memories.
Even my Samsung 970 Pro has MLC V-NAND.

I wonder how expensive would be an SLC NAND based SSD.
 
testing to destruction of assorted SSDs showed most last twice what their rated TBW guidelines showed them capable of....(which, even for heavy uses, should last them 15 years)

My own 500 GB 960 EVO has only 24 TB of writes total in 2.5 years of 3-4 hours per day usage, just to put 300-500 TBW ratings in perspective...; at that rate, 15-20 years should be plenty to outlast the CPU and mainboard, etc...
 

USAFRet

Titan
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My own 500 GB 960 EVO has only 24 TB of writes total in 2.5 years of 3-4 hours per day usage, just to put 300-500 TBW ratings in perspective...; at that rate, 15-20 years should be plenty to outlast the CPU and mainboard, etc...
Even further, the 7 drives in my system (listed below) total 58TBW. A couple of those drives (the 2x 840 EVO) are just over 5 years old, of basically 24/7 use.
So all the drives together don't rise to the warranty number of the oldest and smallest.
 

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