Question suggestions for dual desk mount

kaspersen15

Prominent
Mar 9, 2018
27
0
530
0
first of, i hope this is the correct place to ask about this.

so im looking for a dual screen mount for at least 27 inch with a quick way to dismount the screen
if it could support much bigger screens as well would be awesome as i want one that i can expand on if i want bigger or even curved screen in the future.
i need it to be able to turn the screen 90 degrees.
i have been looking for some time and i find lots and lots of diffrent mounts but kind figure our why some are 69 dollars others are 249.
i hope someone would recommend something, brands, models, experience everything is good.

thanks in advance.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Think of the mount's cost as an "insurance policy" for your large monitors.

And ask yourself if a $69 dollar mount will provide the same coverage/protection as a $249 dollar mount.

Some mounts are very flimsy but designed to appear sturdy.....

Then take a close look at the mount's specs with respect to supported weight, clamping or surface mounting, adherence to VESA standards and sizing options.

Any given mount may support some stated weight range but could start sagging thereafter.

I recommend looking at as many mounts as you physically can. Go with overkill. Especially for a dual monitor setup using two 27" monitors. Mounts should be heavy, come with clamps, screws, wire guides, etc..

And do not forget the mounting surface. Does no good, for example, to put screws into some inexpensive particle board desk just to have the screws rip out under the load.

If you do expect to expand later then go for a dual monitor stand that is already capable of handling large monitors. I.e., spend $249 now versus $69 now and then an additional $249 if you do expand to larger, curved screen monitors.

Just my thoughts.....
 
Reactions: kaspersen15

kaspersen15

Prominent
Mar 9, 2018
27
0
530
0
Think of the mount's cost as an "insurance policy" for your large monitors.

And ask yourself if a $69 dollar mount will provide the same coverage/protection as a $249 dollar mount.

Some mounts are very flimsy but designed to appear sturdy.....

Then take a close look at the mount's specs with respect to supported weight, clamping or surface mounting, adherence to VESA standards and sizing options.

Any given mount may support some stated weight range but could start sagging thereafter.

I recommend looking at as many mounts as you physically can. Go with overkill. Especially for a dual monitor setup using two 27" monitors. Mounts should be heavy, come with clamps, screws, wire guides, etc..

And do not forget the mounting surface. Does no good, for example, to put screws into some inexpensive particle board desk just to have the screws rip out under the load.

If you do expect to expand later then go for a dual monitor stand that is already capable of handling large monitors. I.e., spend $249 now versus $69 now and then an additional $249 if you do expand to larger, curved screen monitors.

Just my thoughts.....
all what you are saying does make good sence, and have been thinking like that.
but then some review pull out a cheap one and say "this is the Sh*t" but i have no idea :)
so i hoped couple of people had some experience they could share.
one thing what is wire guides? dont think i have stumbled upon that yet.
 

Ralston18

Titan
Moderator
Look for reviews by verified buyers or neutral professional websites such as this one. Look for the number of buyer's commenting/reviewing and the ratings that they assign.

Another good source for product information is the vendor's website: read the product manuals, FAQs, and forums (if any) Look for what questions are being asked and what answers (if any) are provided. I am leery of any site that is not balanced, offers vague answers, refers you to information that is not found etc.

As for "wire guides" I misspoke there. Should have said "cable guides". Apologies....

Some monitor mount products come with plastic clips, loops, etc. that snap on to the main post and arms to hold the monitor's power and video cables in place so that the cables do not sag, look neater, and are less likely to be caught and pulled by accident. Cable guides are easier to work with than tape or wire tie downs. And are generally reusable if not made of hard plastic or plastic that becomes brittle with time.
 
Reactions: kaspersen15

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