[SOLVED] System not detecting Nvidia GPUs but AMD or iGPU works fine.

Jan 8, 2022
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I have a system with Core i7 6700K & Z270E Strix motherboard
When I try to boot the PC with RX 590 it boots fine. I see the Asus logo and computer turns on fine..
But when I connect it to GTX 1080Ti or 1070Ti it shows no Asus logo but if I take the HDMI out and plug into motherboard (iGPU) it is working. I checked booted on iGPU while my 1080ti was connected. Device manager was only showing "Intel UHD 630". Nothing else under Display adapters.
Also its a fresh installed windows so none of the gpus have drivers incase u gonna ask me to DDU.
Ive also tried changing initial boot to PEG from iGPU and vice versa from Auto. And tried second x8 slot. No joy. Both of these cards work fine on other systems without any problem.
What could be the issue ?
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Does your Z270E have the latest BIOS version installed?

Have you tried doing a hard reset with either of the RTX cards installed?

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
Does your Z270E have the latest BIOS version installed?

Have you tried doing a hard reset with either of the RTX cards installed?

BIOS Hard Reset procedure

Power off the unit, switch the PSU off and unplug the PSU cord from either the wall or the power supply.

Remove the motherboard CMOS battery for about three to five minutes. In some cases it may be necessary to remove the graphics card to access the CMOS battery.

During that five minutes while the CMOS battery is out of the motherboard, press the power button on the case, continuously, for 15-30 seconds, in order to deplete any residual charge that might be present in the CMOS circuit. After the five minutes is up, reinstall the CMOS battery making sure to insert it with the correct side up just as it came out.

If you had to remove the graphics card you can now reinstall it, but remember to reconnect your power cables if there were any attached to it as well as your display cable.

Now, plug the power supply cable back in, switch the PSU back on and power up the system. It should display the POST screen and the options to enter CMOS/BIOS setup. Enter the bios setup program and reconfigure the boot settings for either the Windows boot manager or for legacy systems, the drive your OS is installed on if necessary.

Save settings and exit. If the system will POST and boot then you can move forward from there including going back into the bios and configuring any other custom settings you may need to configure such as Memory XMP, A-XMP or D.O.C.P profile settings, custom fan profile settings or other specific settings you may have previously had configured that were wiped out by resetting the CMOS.

In some cases it may be necessary when you go into the BIOS after a reset, to load the Optimal default or Default values and then save settings, to actually get the hardware tables to reset in the boot manager.

It is probably also worth mentioning that for anything that might require an attempt to DO a hard reset in the first place, IF the problem is related to a lack of video signal, it is a GOOD IDEA to try a different type of display as many systems will not work properly for some reason with displayport configurations. It is worth trying HDMI if you are having no display or lack of visual ability to enter the BIOS, or no signal messages.
 
Jan 8, 2022
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No its still on a 2018 Bios . If I try to upgrade bios via Flash Utility from Bios using Internet, it says already running latest version. I will try manually updating.
Nd yes I have tried hard resetting bios.
Using different display connector is also something I will try but I think when I boot into windows using motherboard's hdmi (inteluhd) while Nvidia gpu is in PCIe slot it should still say like "Generic Display adaptor" or Unknown display adaptor if not the actual name. But it doesn't even detects the graphics card even bios says no dedicated gpu. But when I plug in Radeon card it works completely fine.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
What is the EXACT model of your power supply? How long has it been in service?

What is the EXACT power supply (And other hardware) of the other systems that these cards "worked fine on"?

I think your main problem MIGHT turn out to be the BIOS support. The RX590 is a fourth Gen GCN architecture, which means that support for that architecture has been around for a while and is usually even supported in some much older hardware.

The 1000 series cards are Pascal, which was a new architecture at the time of release, and while many people will tell you things like "as long as it's PCI 2.0 or 3.0 or 4.0, etc., it should work fine because it has a PCIe slot that supports it", but we simply know that this was not true in a great many cases. Now, it would seem to be an opposite situation here, because Pascal cards were released beginning in 2016 while the Z270 motherboards were released in 2017, so you would think that with even a beginning BIOS version there would be support, and that's true, there should be, but you just never know. I've seen a great many situations where for whatever reason something would not work until a BIOS update had been done, even though it should not have been a factor at all.

If manually updating the BIOS doesn't work then the only other thing I can tell you that might seem to be at all relevant beyond what you've already tried is that they are faulty graphics cards, although you say you have used them in other systems.

Are you trying to use these Nvidia cards by themselves, or are you only trying to use them WITH the AMD card installed?
 

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