Question The computer restarted unexpectedly or encountered an unexpected error. windows installation cannot proceed

jinchuriki

Commendable
Sep 9, 2018
126
2
1,585
0
Hey, I encountered this issue in my laptop and I'm kinda lost, here is an image of the issue:



I tried to completely reinstall windows, completely deleted and formatted the hard drive, and still after installing windows I'm receiving this issue...
I tried the windows installation on another machine and it worked just fine, so I'm completely confused about it. I don't think it can be related to BIOS settings, and I can't see how it could be related to previous windows installation or something as the HDD is formatted.

Never saw anything similar to this. I tried googling this issue, the solution is always changing the ChildCompletion setup in regedit, but I don't even have this folder.

Help would be much appreciated, thanks :)
 

jinchuriki

Commendable
Sep 9, 2018
126
2
1,585
0
could be the hardware. what the laptop model?
So.............Possibly.
I managed to solve it somehow, what I did was formatting the HDD, then created some random few GB's partition, and then created another partition with the rest of the left memory, installed windows on that partition, and then it works.
Idk...But it works I guess :\
Thanks anyway.
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
the HDD is formatted.
This may well be your problem. You shouldn't be installing Windows to a "formatted" partition. You should be disconnecting ALL secondary drives, if there are any on this laptop, and during the installation you should be choosing the "Custom" option, then deleting ALL existing partitions on that drive you are installing Windows TO, and then when there is only a single remaining listing, that is unformatted and unpartitioned, you should click Next and allow Windows to create any and all necessary partitions and perform any required formatting, which it will do automatically.

If you do THAT, and you still have a problem, then the drive should be tested using a utility like Seatools for DOS or WD lifeguard tools for DOS, and run the Long or extended test. If the drive has ANY errors or bad sectors, it should be immediately discarded and replaced with a new or known good drive.
 

jinchuriki

Commendable
Sep 9, 2018
126
2
1,585
0
This may well be your problem. You shouldn't be installing Windows to a "formatted" partition. You should be disconnecting ALL secondary drives, if there are any on this laptop, and during the installation you should be choosing the "Custom" option, then deleting ALL existing partitions on that drive you are installing Windows TO, and then when there is only a single remaining listing, that is unformatted and unpartitioned, you should click Next and allow Windows to create any and all necessary partitions and perform any required formatting, which it will do automatically.

If you do THAT, and you still have a problem, then the drive should be tested using a utility like Seatools for DOS or WD lifeguard tools for DOS, and run the Long or extended test. If the drive has ANY errors or bad sectors, it should be immediately discarded and replaced with a new or known good drive.
"completely deleted and formatted the hard drive" o.0
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
"Completely deleted and formatted the hard drive" is NOT what I've explained needs to be done. It's COMPLETELY something................else.

 

jinchuriki

Commendable
Sep 9, 2018
126
2
1,585
0
"Completely deleted and formatted the hard drive" is NOT what I've explained needs to be done. It's COMPLETELY something................else.

Oh lord.........k bro.
Here is another useful tutorial:
https://www.digitalunite.com/technology-guides/computer-basics/using-computer/how-turn-computer
 

Darkbreeze

Retired Mod
I'm wasn't trying to be "funny", like you apparently are. There are VERY CLEAR differences between the process that SHOULD be followed, and "completely deleted and formatted the hard drive", which actually doesn't even make a lot of sense the way it's phrased. There are minute specifics when it comes to computer technology and storage devices, that absolutely make all the difference in the world sometimes. Sometimes they don't as well. In this case, they MIGHT.

So, "deleting and reformatting" a hard drive, to be specific, is NOT the same thing as "deleting all of the existing partitions and then installing SPECIFICALLY TO the UNPARTIONED and UNFORMATTED drive space". They are ENTIRELY different things. In one instance, where you've created a new partition and formatted it, you've told Windows "this is where I want to install" and "I want the Windows installation to be THIS specific type of installation based on the format of the partition". And, in many cases, that results in the wrong type of partition, as in an MBR partition vs a GPT partition, with one of them being a legacy type installation and the other being a fully UEFI compatible partition.

If you weren't aware of that, you may have inadvertently created a partition type that is contrary to what Windows sees as being the optimal type of partition based on the current BIOS configuration settings. One type is not compatible with legacy installations while the other is not fully compatible with UEFI or secure boot type configurations.

But I'm sure you knew that, right?

Furthermore, Windows itself MUCH PREFERS to create it's partitions, of which there will usually be three or four, including the primary OS partition, the hidden recovery partition, the EFI and boot partitions, and it WANTS to format those partitions specifically according to it's own designs. Not only is that ok, it is MUCH preferred, because it will always do a better job than you will, based on the hardware in use, the Windows version and the BIOS configuration settings.

So, I wasn't trying to be funny, at all, and my tutorial, isn't some dumb joke like what you linked to. It includes specific, detailed steps on the PREFERRED manner in which Windows should be installed. Most people who THINK they know how to install Windows, because they've been doing it for years, have been doing it wrong for most Windows versions since Windows 7. But you probably already knew that anyhow, right, since you already knew about the "how to turn your computer on" tutorial.

I was seriously trying to offer you some help with figuring out something that you clearly weren't able to figure out, so, good luck with that.
 

jinchuriki

Commendable
Sep 9, 2018
126
2
1,585
0
I'm wasn't trying to be "funny", like you apparently are. There are VERY CLEAR differences between the process that SHOULD be followed, and "completely deleted and formatted the hard drive", which actually doesn't even make a lot of sense the way it's phrased. There are minute specifics when it comes to computer technology and storage devices, that absolutely make all the difference in the world sometimes. Sometimes they don't as well. In this case, they MIGHT.

So, "deleting and reformatting" a hard drive, to be specific, is NOT the same thing as "deleting all of the existing partitions and then installing SPECIFICALLY TO the UNPARTIONED and UNFORMATTED drive space". They are ENTIRELY different things. In one instance, where you've created a new partition and formatted it, you've told Windows "this is where I want to install" and "I want the Windows installation to be THIS specific type of installation based on the format of the partition". And, in many cases, that results in the wrong type of partition, as in an MBR partition vs a GPT partition, with one of them being a legacy type installation and the other being a fully UEFI compatible partition.

If you weren't aware of that, you may have inadvertently created a partition type that is contrary to what Windows sees as being the optimal type of partition based on the current BIOS configuration settings. One type is not compatible with legacy installations while the other is not fully compatible with UEFI or secure boot type configurations.

But I'm sure you knew that, right?

Furthermore, Windows itself MUCH PREFERS to create it's partitions, of which there will usually be three or four, including the primary OS partition, the hidden recovery partition, the EFI and boot partitions, and it WANTS to format those partitions specifically according to it's own designs. Not only is that ok, it is MUCH preferred, because it will always do a better job than you will, based on the hardware in use, the Windows version and the BIOS configuration settings.

So, I wasn't trying to be funny, at all, and my tutorial, isn't some dumb joke like what you linked to. It includes specific, detailed steps on the PREFERRED manner in which Windows should be installed. Most people who THINK they know how to install Windows, because they've been doing it for years, have been doing it wrong for most Windows versions since Windows 7. But you probably already knew that anyhow, right, since you already knew about the "how to turn your computer on" tutorial.

I was seriously trying to offer you some help with figuring out something that you clearly weren't able to figure out, so, good luck with that.
ok
 

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